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Has anyone used Easy Boots?

This is a discussion on Has anyone used Easy Boots? within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category

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        12-08-2012, 10:31 AM
      #11
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by loosie    
    What's his management, environment & diet? You mention grain - I would definitely be doing without that or any other high starch ingredients.
    I see diet as the most important, second to that would be movement, and then trimming. More than likely if he is flat footed its diet.
    loosie likes this.
         
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        12-08-2012, 10:42 AM
      #12
    Weanling
    I don't ride him limpy. The boots would just be for when he is rideable ( but instead of shoes ) during the winter etc. THe farrier says he does not look like he foundered. He guessed Navicular. The vet says not navicular ( and the previous owner was told that he had been x ray'd before she got him, and the xrays showed nothing... no navicular) and HE guessed founder. ( and I have nothing to check as far as his history... he was given to me, and the previous owner had no contact info for the woman she got him from... and calling vets and asking about horses named Sam... lol.. vet says there are a million!) So, have cut wayyy back on grain ( just add a handful with his glucosamine..) He gets good hay, there is very little grass in the pasture ( although when it is nice out I do occasionally let him out to eat for a little while...) He flares a lot. Limping comes and goes. No rhyme or reason ( not after a ride, or anything that I can identify...) I am thinking of getting a chiro out to look at him when I can schedule that. I am wondering if he is not arthritic. He has very short strides. I am willing to do what ever I can to make my boy happy- what are you thinking as far as diet??
         
        12-08-2012, 10:49 AM
      #13
    Weanling
    And as far as enviornment, he is pasture boarded, they are out 24/7 with a lean to. So he is moving, not standing still in a stall. When he lays down he gets up easily. Does not seem to avoid lying down or getting up. The vet and farrier agree on eggbars since he has a hard time keeping a heel on him. The shoes with heels worked well, but we think the eggbars might work better and I am going to give them a try in the spring. It is the one thing my vet and farrier agree on! =)
         
        12-08-2012, 07:25 PM
      #14
    Trained
    Of course, wouldn't advise you just disregard the advice of your vet & farrier, but if the horse is flat footed with lots of flaring & the farrier says no sign of founder & the vet suspects founder but hasn't xrayed or given any other treatment plan.... some other professional opinions wouldn't go astray before you jump into something like eggbars & jacking up heels & the likes.

    If he has as thin a sole as I'm guessing, along with the leverage of untreated flares, that sounds like lots of 'rhyme or reason' for lameness. If you would like any opinions here, you need to provide more info - on management, diet, etc, as well as hoof pics - see link below in my signature for that.
         
        12-09-2012, 07:20 PM
      #15
    Banned
    Wink

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cebee    
    And as far as enviornment, he is pasture boarded, they are out 24/7 with a lean to. So he is moving, not standing still in a stall. When he lays down he gets up easily. Does not seem to avoid lying down or getting up. The vet and farrier agree on eggbars since he has a hard time keeping a heel on him. The shoes with heels worked well, but we think the eggbars might work better and I am going to give them a try in the spring. It is the one thing my vet and farrier agree on! =)
    I would listen to loosie iv been watching threads on hoof issues from what I see she's good. Would be a good idea to post pictures that way you can get more help. I would also get second opions on your horse too. My current farrier thinks underrun heels have been chopped off so yeah not to good. Iam dealing with lame horses right now and they all have really bad underrun heels. Iam in serious need of help myself with my own horses so iv spent hours researching and reading about underrun heels. They do cause lameness in time so do your self a favor post pictures.
         
        12-09-2012, 07:26 PM
      #16
    Weanling
    The farrier spends all summer getting his heels built up... looking good... the shoes come off and he wears em right down again... I will have to get out to the barn when it is light and get some pics... Interestingly he had a totally great day today. Did not ride ( he was soaked... it is 35 and rain here...) but not a bit of limp, trotting all over, looking totally comfortable... tomorrow I could go back and he could be limpy... or he could stay great like this for months... sigh...
         
        12-09-2012, 07:48 PM
      #17
    Trained
    Sounds like he definitely needs boots or such, and I suggest you look into extra Mg in the diet - just learning more about this myself; http://elektralife.com/userfiles/fil...mForHorses.pdf
         
        12-10-2012, 06:13 PM
      #18
    Foal
    I think the grain and pasture are your problems, if your winters are times of snow like ours and you cut out the grain that should help a lot. As far as movement them being able to move is great and if you work them even better. The more movement the more the hoof will improve. The trim can help the process along but those are the main concern. The only thing I would say is even though the horse is quite flared don't remove the hoofwall too much.

    Its basically the fact that yes you want to remove the flare to take the leverage off of it so it can come in more connected. That being said you remove too much and now the horse is tenderfooted even worse and doesn't want to move around so the problem continues to stay at a stall. Shortening up trim cycles helps this a lot so there is not such large changes when trimming. And the main thing is that you need to remember is it has taken a long time for the feet to get in this condition so you won't see the horse walking perfectly fine for a little while. Some horses will need to almost completely grow in a new connected hoof wall before you see a big change but when it happens it seems like it happens overnight. On the other hand some will adjust faster even though the feet still look bad.
         
        12-10-2012, 06:45 PM
      #19
    Weanling
    The vet is suggesting keeping the toe short, and trying wider shoes to give him room to flare without growing over the shoes. But I would prefer a better hoof wall so we don't have to worry so much. Am hoping by spring there is some change! Luckily am not much of a winter rider anyhow... time for him to heal and grow..
         
        12-10-2012, 07:47 PM
      #20
    Banned
    I don't understand why your vet would want to give the hoof room to flare. If the hoof is flaring then its not balanced right. Flaring isnt something you want to have its a sign the hoofs arent being trimmed right.
    loosie and Makoda like this.
         

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