Help With My Farrier's Work?
 
 

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Help With My Farrier's Work?

This is a discussion on Help With My Farrier's Work? within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Farrier's work
  • My farrier

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    02-26-2013, 02:55 PM
  #1
Yearling
Help With My Farrier's Work?

I was just told that I should steer clear of the farrier I have been using for a while now. Gal said that he trims too short and leaves no heel. I'm crappy with it comes to judging a farriers trim job around the heels. I never know exactly how much he should be left. I was wondering if it would be a good idea to find a new farrier or maybe take some pictures if I have my usual farrier out again and see what you guys think cause I really would like to learn more about the hooves mostly heels. I get that you want the hoof walls to be same angle as pastern and shoulder right? But I'm not completely clear on the terms run under heels or heels in general. Please help me, I feel foolish asking questions like these.
     
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    02-26-2013, 03:36 PM
  #2
Green Broke
If you can provide some pictures I can let you know if the toe/heel is too short or not. (:

You can probably take pictures now as long as the feet are cleaned off and it isn't time for a trim just yet.
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    02-26-2013, 07:02 PM
  #3
Banned
What some people claim are too short of heels are really under run heels. Would be helpful to see some pictures of your horses feet.
     
    02-26-2013, 07:45 PM
  #4
Green Broke
Sorry but pics are necessary for an answer

1. No pics of wet hooves. Pick them clean, then brush top and bottom with a stiff bristled brush.

2. Clear daylight view of the undersides.

3. Stand the horse on something level like the barn floor, cement, gravel driveway will work as long as the gravel isn't new and sticking up all over the place

4. Stand the horse square on the fronts when taking those pics and square on the backs when taking those pics.

5. Set the camera at ground level, aimed for a side view of each hoof and then set the camera at ground level aimed for a back view of each set of hooves.

Hopefully you can do that in the daylight or in excellent barn light.

It's too bad I can't practice what I'm preaching as I am probably the worst one on this forum for trying the hardest to get the best pics and they turn out the worst

Anyway, there are some great trimmers and farriers on this forum that will be happy to look at your pics and help you along - I am not one of them
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    02-26-2013, 11:39 PM
  #5
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by walkinthewalk    
3. Stand the horse on something level like the barn floor,
& if you can't do that, take a piece of ply or such with you for them to stand on.

Quote:
It's too bad I can't practice what I'm preaching as I am probably the worst one on this forum for trying the hardest to get the best pics and they turn out the worst
Not just you luv, it's harder than it seems it should be! The beauty of digital - you can take heaps & there are bound to be a few good 'uns in there!
smrobs likes this.
     
    02-26-2013, 11:40 PM
  #6
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by walkinthewalk    
3. Stand the horse on something level like the barn floor,
& if you can't do that(we often don't have barns, concrete, etc), take a piece of ply or such with you for them to stand on.

Quote:
It's too bad I can't practice what I'm preaching as I am probably the worst one on this forum for trying the hardest to get the best pics and they turn out the worst
Not just you luv, it's harder than it seems it should be! The beauty of digital - you can take heaps & there are bound to be a few good 'uns in there!
walkinthewalk likes this.
     
    02-27-2013, 11:14 AM
  #7
Yearling
I'll try to get some pictures today but they do need to get trimmed pretty soon. Dash (the 8 month AQHA filly I just got 2 weeks ago) really has some wonky feet but her's were very over grown and making her stand funny. I'll see what I can do, I might have to do the ply board thing cause its very snowy out here and I'm not sure if I'll be able to find a good flat spot.
     
    02-27-2013, 02:02 PM
  #8
Yearling
Ok these are Novas feet on the flatest decent area I got I hope their somewhat helpful took pictures of Rain and Dash's feet too but this computer is so slow I'm just going to post Novas for the moment and post the other two horses when I get home. Its probably been 4-5 weeks since her last trim. What do you think?












She was standing square when I took the pictures and walked out of it when I took this one.

     
    02-27-2013, 02:46 PM
  #9
Yearling
Here's The new Filly's feet, he hasn't trimmed them at all, they were way long so I just took a file and took some of the flare off but tried to stick to their natural shape as much as possible, tried to leave the bottom of her feet alone. I know baby feet can be kinda goofy for a while but hers kinda looked freaky to me at first. Almost ducky. Her front legs kinda are all over the place right now. Really hoping they straighten up a bit.























     
    02-27-2013, 02:57 PM
  #10
Yearling
And this finally Rain my arabian x Paint.














     

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