High Low Syndrome - Page 2
 
 

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High Low Syndrome

This is a discussion on High Low Syndrome within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • High low syndrome in horses
  • High and low shoulders syndrome

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    02-01-2013, 12:10 AM
  #11
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by ~*~anebel~*~    
Hi-lo and club foot are not the same. Dare I say every horse has some degree of hi-lo in that they have a "high" side
Agreed - none of us, horse, human or otherwise are perfectly symmetrical. But the term 'club foot' is subjective & can indeed just mean 'high-low'. I think that term probably came about to describe mild cases, to point out reasons why 'balancing' the feet in relation to each other isn't necessarily a good thing to do & because the 'club' lable was only given to severe ones.

Quote:
where the arc of the hoof is higher, and a "low" side where the arc is lower. They will have one bigger shoulder, and one more well developed hindquarter (usually the "high" side).
Very important points to consider I recon, because often people only take notice of the high side when talking hoofcare & very often I think the low needs more support, due to being flatter. Also body issues - this obviously effects saddle fit & athletic ability & 'evenness' too... as you also mention, being one of those dressage freaks!

I agree with your farrier too regarding wedge pads, whether or not you're trying to jack up the 'low' side or treat bilateral collapsed heels. BUT for both feet I've found that sometimes(haven't tried it on enough horses to say whether generally, but seems likely...) a 'frog support' pad, providing extra protection & also support/pressure under the frog but NOT walls is helpful in both high heels & helps 'rehab' collapsed/underrun heels. It provides extra pressure/stimulation of the 'high' frog/caudal section, which is otherwise prone to becoming weaker & contracting due to lack of use. It can also provide support under the 'low' foot, to enable the heel walls to be relieved of excess pressure so they can start to relax down & back, becoming more upright & able to support the hooves.
     
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    02-01-2013, 12:44 AM
  #12
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie    
Agreed - none of us, horse, human or otherwise are perfectly symmetrical. But the term 'club foot' is subjective & can indeed just mean 'high-low'. I think that term probably came about to describe mild cases, to point out reasons why 'balancing' the feet in relation to each other isn't necessarily a good thing to do & because the 'club' lable was only given to severe ones.



Very important points to consider I recon, because often people only take notice of the high side when talking hoofcare & very often I think the low needs more support, due to being flatter. Also body issues - this obviously effects saddle fit & athletic ability & 'evenness' too... as you also mention, being one of those dressage freaks!

I agree with your farrier too regarding wedge pads, whether or not you're trying to jack up the 'low' side or treat bilateral collapsed heels. BUT for both feet I've found that sometimes(haven't tried it on enough horses to say whether generally, but seems likely...) a 'frog support' pad, providing extra protection & also support/pressure under the frog but NOT walls is helpful in both high heels & helps 'rehab' collapsed/underrun heels. It provides extra pressure/stimulation of the 'high' frog/caudal section, which is otherwise prone to becoming weaker & contracting due to lack of use. It can also provide support under the 'low' foot, to enable the heel walls to be relieved of excess pressure so they can start to relax down & back, becoming more upright & able to support the hooves.

Yes, I do agree with you on the frog support. We were going to try that but certain circumstances made it the right time to try barefoot for a while. If the shoes do go back on at some point we will be trying for some frog support - what pads (generally) do you like to use?? The soil and the footing at the place I board both tend to pack hard into the hooves and there are few stones so I rarely pick out the feet when it is dry out for the added frog support.
     
    02-01-2013, 01:19 AM
  #13
Super Moderator
I guess everything needs a name....high- low-syndrome....hmm...
My first farrier, master farriers who learned from his father who also learned from his father, who did, with a journeyman and one apprentice, between 800 and 1000 horses a month, race horses and sport horses in prime warmblood country told me that each horse is either right-or left- handed and, from when it's born, favors one foot over the other when grazing. If nobody pays attention to the foal's feet, one high one low develops. He refused to overcorrect this once the foal was 6 months old. He believed that everything had adapted by that age. This farrier was way ahead of his time, did a trim very close to a now called barefoot trim, rolled toe and all. He trimmed my hi-low TB " normal" and we never had a problem.

I did see a barefoot trimmer, Strasser school of thought, who corrected a hi-low horse and permanently crippled it, barely pasture sound.
It's of course, entirely different if the high-low is aquired due to founder for example.
loosie likes this.
     
    02-02-2013, 03:36 PM
  #14
Weanling


Got some pictures today. Had a farrier come out and he says its a mild club foot. Since I'm not doing a lot of trail riding and she'll be ridden in a sand arena, he said he'd like to keep her barefoot and trim her little and often. He explained to me the risks of taking off too much too fast. He said something I should have written down, because now I can't remember exactly what he said. Something about the flexor tendon vs. the suspensionory ligament and trimming one way protects the suspensory ligament better, that we don't want to strain either, but if you damage the suspensory it's way worse for the horse. He said he could come out every 4 weeks or he should show me how to rasp her feet and come out every 8 weeks, to save me from paying for a trim every 4 weeks. I told him I'd like him to come out every 4 weeks for now, and he said 'ok, we'll in that case, what I can do is trim the fronts every 4 weeks and the backs every other appt.' he said he doesn't want to do wedges because it masks the problem instead of fixing it and throws their balance out of whack. He said its a good short term fix, but its not good for the long term health of the horse.
This guy apprenticed under a well known farrier around here, who hurt his back, and now he shoes not only his own clients horses, but all of this other guys clients as well. What do you guys think?
     
    02-02-2013, 06:55 PM
  #15
Trained
Was the pic after his trim? Be interested to see some different angles - check link in signature below for tips. While that angle's not the best & can't be accurate about much with only one angle, it appears that both feet are flared at the toes and that the low foot has longish but 'underrun' heels, potentially contributing to that 'bullnose' look of the toe wall. Perhaps someone tried to match the front feet by letting the heels grow on that foot, but that was the result. I'd guess that foot needs more attention & 'correction' than the 'up' foot.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tessa7707    
He explained to me the risks of taking off too much too fast.
Sounds like the farrier has said some relevant things. The above comment implies he does want to change things, albeit gradually, which IME, depending on what exactly he means, may not be for the best, but then he's there, I'm not, for one.
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    02-02-2013, 09:16 PM
  #16
Yearling
High low can be fixed "barefoot" in certain situations. I still use tools but I dodnt need shoes. Usually, the low foot is very flat and deflated in the frog and needs something to re inflate it while the horse re-levels his shoulders/body and the foot grows back in properly.

Grazing can make it worse if the horse stands with the low foot out in front all the time. Babies will develop a "grazing foot" if they are particularly long legged and short necked as they mature and tend to stand withe the same foot out in front all the time. Feeding the horse hay from knee to chest level from a feeder in a good sized dry lot can help a great deal while this grows out.

Almost always in a significant hi low, the low foot has a long toe and underrun heel and the capsule is slipped forward which has to be corrected and grown out. I used soleguard and/or casting typically to achieve bony alignment in this foot and grow it out. It is the problem foot. The high foot typically can simply be maintained as is till the low foot catches up.


I agree tho that this horse appears to actually have a club foot of some nature. Id be interested in looking at his shoulders and body alignment.
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    02-02-2013, 09:21 PM
  #17
Trained
I agree this does look like a low grade club, not hi-lo.

I also agree that addressing the low foot in hi-lo is what needs to be done. I paid a few farriers far too much money to hack off the heel of the hi foot. It plain and simply doesn't work.
Tessa7707 likes this.
     
    02-03-2013, 02:23 AM
  #18
Weanling
This pic was not after a trim. She had her shoes (wedges) pulled about 5 weeks ago, according to the previous owner. What angles would be best? I can take more in the morning. What angles would be best to show you her shoulder alignment? Here are some more pictures of her.





     

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