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Hoof care, self trim V no trim

This is a discussion on Hoof care, self trim V no trim within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Broodmare hoof care
  • Broodmare hoof trim

 
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    07-16-2011, 03:57 PM
  #11
Trained
I trim my own between farrier visits. He comes every few months, and everytime he says I should be doing them all myself but I like having him double checking - he can also be a lot more aggressive than I am confident being, so it works well doing it this way.

My horses are all ridden/shown barefoot.
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    07-16-2011, 11:08 PM
  #12
Green Broke
I grew up with no job broodmares not being trimmed. They did, however, have a fair bit of field to graze over, and their hooves never got ridiculous long, since they wore them down themselves. Yes, the edges would start to chip a bit, but nothing huge.

Since they were broodmares, they were only expected to be that...broodmares, so their hooves weren't a concern.
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    07-16-2011, 11:32 PM
  #13
Showing
I think that, so long as the owner has a basic idea of proper hoof function and how a properly trimmed hoof should look, they can do a decent enough job knocking some length off every few weeks, especially for horses that are not in work and have no special needs. When I was in high school, I used to occasionally trim our retirees when my Dad was busy and I noticed they were long. None of them ended up crippled any worse than some of them already were (old injuries). I would still be okay with doing it now except I just really don't enjoy it at all. I have no desire to learn how to do it to the same caliber as a real farrier would. I can knock some length off and keep them balanced, but that's about it.

If I was having to pay a farrier to come every few weeks and trim 12-15 horses, then you bet your butt I would start doing maintenance trims myself. However, my farrier is my brother and he trades free hoof care for all our personal horses (retired and working, shoes and trim) for us giving him hay to feed his 3 horses and a home for his 1 retiree. It works out nicely, we get a large load of hay when we buy and he comes and gets a bale whenever he needs one. Then, every few weeks when he has a free day like today, he comes over and I line up the horses for him to trim/shoe.
     
    07-17-2011, 03:26 PM
  #14
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by corinowalk    
I am hoping that once Froggys feet are in good shape (neglected) I will be able to at least rasp on my own. If I can even hold off a few weeks, it would surely help. I use one of the better farriers in my area and he is super busy. With Froggy 'rehabbing' his hooves, they are growing so fast. At 4 weeks, he looks like a horse at 12. It sure would help him and his feet if I could learn to just take a little off the top.
I agree with you completely. My gelding looks like its been a good 9-10 weeks after only 4. He's on a 5 week(or if I can't state d the way they're looking, spoonsful) rotation right now. My farrier charges a barn call for just one but when the 4 other horses at the barn he is responsible for are trimmed he waives the fee. So yea, $30 every 2 months is better than 70 every two. But now I'm just spoiled because we've gone barefoot and prices have drooped :)
My farrier is going to show me how to trim in-between so he's on the same 8 week rotation as the rest of the horses. It's cheaper for me and easier for him since he lives quite a little drive away.
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    07-17-2011, 04:42 PM
  #15
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golden Horse    
Given this set of facts.

Horses that are unridden, pasture puffs or broodies,
Have good hooves, no issues, definitely don't need shoes,
No special care or treatment is needed.

What would you think of the following options,
The owner trimming alternate to farrier visits, so 6 weeks owner,
12 weeks farrier, then 18 weeks on owner again.

Or the farrier trimming twice a year and the owner trimming in between.

Maybe you think that people shouldn't have horses unless they are trimmed every 6 weeks by the farrier.

* Just to be clear this is merely a discussion question, prompted by the comment I read recently that "a bad trim is better than no trim*

**Bear in mind that some people are struggling more than ever before with cash flow issues,
And also that there are some people who live in remote areas,
So it can be difficult to get farriers to attend regularly. **
I think IF the owner educated themselves on how to do a proper trim prior to, and rather than, just deciding to rasp away,
Then I have no problem with the owner doing their own horses feet on occasion, or even routinely, between farrier visits.

As far as whether the horse is a broodie, or pasture puff, etc.
I DON'T think that should have ANY bearing on proper, and TIMELY, hoof care.

I also don't agree with the "bad trim is better than no trim" philosophy.

I do agree with the sentiment of 'no hoof, no horse' since all domesticated horses, confined by humans, need routine farrier care.
Since they are not in the wild, they lead a completely different lifestyle to that of a wild horse,
Those type horses who are on the move daily.

I think if someone is struggling financially with caring for multiple horses,
They need to re- evaluate whats best for the horse, and NOT themselves,
And perhaps, sell, give, loan, or lease out, some animals so as to not risk proper care of the animal

JMO
     
    07-17-2011, 05:08 PM
  #16
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by WhoaNow    

As far as whether the horse is a broodie, or pasture puff, etc.
I DON'T think that should have ANY bearing on proper, and TIMELY, hoof care.
I have a different view on this, if a horse is being ridden and competed on it is only right and proper that his/her feet are kept in 100% good condition. Pasture puffs and broodies however, not so critical for them. In my case Bert, when I bought her 9 years without a trim, sound as anything never had a moments trouble with her feet. Now she is being put back under saddle she is being trimmed, she's having her second one this week, and she'll be good to go.

Just to be clear again for anyone who may be confused, I am not talking about myself here, but this discussion was prompted by another conversation about the issues of getting minis trimmed, seeing as many farriers don't like doing them.
     
    07-17-2011, 05:29 PM
  #17
Cat
Green Broke
If a horse doesn't get trimmed in a timely manner it leaves them open for flaring, chips, cracks and wearing unevenly which can lead to soreness issues.

There are plenty of sources online and in books to learn how to trim. I do not advocate learning from these sources - yet, if someone had to choose between letting the horse go or trimming themselves, I think they could learn enough from these sources to have a "make do" trim until they can get a farrier out.

Quote:
I think if someone is struggling financially with caring for multiple horses,
They need to re- evaluate whats best for the horse, and NOT themselves,
And perhaps, sell, give, loan, or lease out, some animals so as to not risk proper care of the animal
While I do agree for the most part, but what if they are at a point where they are trying to find homes for their horses but are having no luck yet? The economy still sucks in many areas and I know of several people trying to sell or give away their horses. There are about 10 horses that are sound trail horses that are priced at $300 or below locally that I know of and another one that has potential (just needs a refresher with someone that knows what they are doing) that is up for free. That is just in the surrounding counties in the middle of summer with a good grass year. I really hate to see what this winter will bring.
     
    07-17-2011, 05:34 PM
  #18
Green Broke
I started trimming my horses myself a while back. I started doing this because my regular trimmer got hurt and pretty much retired. I tried a couple different trimmers, but couldn't find a satisfactory replacement.
I don't think it is something a beginner should do, and wouldn't suggest it if your horses have problem feet. If you have a basic understanding of trimming, I don't see a problem with doing it yourself.
Its hard work though. Well worth the money I was paying my regular trimmer to do it.
     
    07-17-2011, 05:55 PM
  #19
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cat    
If a horse doesn't get trimmed in a timely manner it leaves them open for flaring,
Chips, cracks and wearing unevenly which can lead to soreness issues.

There are plenty of sources online and in books to learn how to trim.
I do not advocate learning from these sources - yet, if someone had to choose between letting the horse go
Or trimming themselves, I think they could learn enough from
These sources to have a "make do" trim until they can get a farrier out.



While I do agree for the most part,
But what if they are at a point where they are trying to find homes for their horses but are having no luck yet?
The economy still sucks in many areas and I know of several people trying to sell or give away their horses.
There are about 10 horses that are sound trail horses that are priced at $300 or below locally that
I know of and another one that has potential (just needs a refresher with someone that knows what they are doing) that is up for free.
That is just in the surrounding counties in the middle of summer with a good grass year.
I really hate to see what this winter will bring.
We were speaking hypothetically here, so I am stating my general thoughts and feelings about farrier care, as well, all things 'horse care' related.

I agree the economy is 'oh so sloooooow' to recover, which makes me happy I only own a few extra mouths to feed.
     
    07-17-2011, 07:59 PM
  #20
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golden Horse    
Just to be clear again for anyone who may be confused, I am not talking about myself here, but this discussion was prompted by another conversation about the issues of getting minis trimmed, seeing as many farriers don't like doing them.
I think I know the thread you are talking about. And just to repeat what I said there I don't know a single farrier who would refuse to do mini. I know plenty who'd refuse to do knuckleheads trying to kick or bite them. As long as mini is trained (which is always an owner's responsibility) I bet you it won't be hard to find a farrier to do it. And quite often those who don't want to put some time to train the horse to behave also don't want to deal with hoofs to start with as they can be kicked.
     

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