Hoof help - no sole at frog apex? - Page 3
 
 

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Hoof help - no sole at frog apex?

This is a discussion on Hoof help - no sole at frog apex? within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Uneven sole hoof
  • Uneven heels hoof

 
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    02-22-2010, 11:11 AM
  #21
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Appyt    

Not necessarily. When a horse is pigeontoed or spayfooted due to conformation they will wear the hoof unevenly.
No, actually they won't if the foot is balanced correctly.
     
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    02-22-2010, 11:18 AM
  #22
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Appyt    
Heck, I wear my heels uneven too. Evidently I walk a bit heavier on the inside of my heels. My shoes testify to that. I do track straight, not splay footed tho. ;)
We don't trim our feet. We often wear shoes not properly designed for our foot/body conformation, creating issues.

The only commonality between you and the horse, it that you're both crooked and stiff, which contributes to the 'way of going' and weight bearing on the feet. I specifically mentioned that already and clearly stated that that will create uneven weight bearing and thus uneven growth. FIX the crookedness in the horse, and that problem will be solved, just as if you fix it in yourself.
     
    02-22-2010, 04:58 PM
  #23
Started
You cannot fix pigeontoes or toeing out. Not when the deviant is above the hoof.
     
    02-22-2010, 05:43 PM
  #24
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Appyt    
You cannot fix pigeontoes or toeing out. Not when the deviant is above the hoof.
I said no such thing, but that's not a correct statement either.

Tight elbows for instance, can in fact create toeing out and that can in fact be fixed. A crooked breast box can in fact make the leg appear crooked and change weight-bearing load on the feet, and that in fact can be fixed. A stuck shoulder will change weight-bearing on the feet, and that as well can be fixed, and so on.

Not all toeing in or toeing out is created equally.

As I said originally...if the foot is balanced (to the horse's leg - which includes to it's genetic crookedness), the horse WILL bear weight equally on it, provided there isn't a physical ailment interfering (of which I've given several examples)...conformation faults do not fall in that category because your balancing the foot to those faults. Any conformation faults bad enough to cause uneven weight bearing after the fact are also faults that will create lameness immediately upon regular work. In other words, such a horse is not mechanically functional.

I've worked with a number of equine professionals and we've studied and experimented with this extensively. The key always lies with the farrier being able to 'see' where the balance of a foot is. A talent that few possess. But that is no different than any other profession...only a small percentage are excellent at what they do.
     
    02-22-2010, 06:08 PM
  #25
Trained
There is a difference between wear and growth and we have to keep that in mind. While I agree that if all is straight the hoof will wear evenly, that doesn't mean that it will grow evenly and I think that has a bearing on what we perceive as growth and also the resulting splay in or out.

I am 99% certain, for example, that my friend's paint colt grows his front hooves unevenly. The first time I trimmed him, his heels were off, so I evened them up and my friend was very impressed with how much better he stood and moved after that. So I went again in 6 weeks and again his heels were uneven. He was on soft pasture and I doubt the uneven heels were a result uneven wear.

However, I must agree that in the case of my mare, she is NOT bearing weight evenly as displayed by her uneven bulb development and that IS my fault in trimming. I'm going to ask my trimmer when she comes out how much she thinks I'm out by.
     
    02-22-2010, 06:25 PM
  #26
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthernMama    
There is a difference between wear and growth and we have to keep that in mind. While I agree that if all is straight the hoof will wear evenly, that doesn't mean that it will grow evenly and I think that has a bearing on what we perceive as growth and also the resulting splay in or out.
The only growth differences should be the amount of heel vs the amount of toe that a horse grows based on 'genetics'. Lateral growth will be equal if all is right in the horse.

Quote:
I am 99% certain, for example, that my friend's paint colt grows his front hooves unevenly. The first time I trimmed him, his heels were off, so I evened them up and my friend was very impressed with how much better he stood and moved after that. So I went again in 6 weeks and again his heels were uneven. He was on soft pasture and I doubt the uneven heels were a result uneven wear.
I will bet money the horse is not symmetrical and moves crooked and that is why you see the change in the heels six weeks later. If the horse moved straight, was evenly muscled, that wouldn't happen.

Unbalanced feet can cause body unsoundness. Body unsoundness can cause unbalanced feet. Fix the feet, fix the body...no more issues regardless of the horse toeing in or out, or whatever...again, except in the cases where the horse is not mechanically functional.

Another way of saying it, 'make the world (hoof capsule) right with the frog'. The frog is static and is at the end of that crooked or straight limb, therefore it is the frog that dictates how much heel, how much toe, how much wall, and therefore balance.

If the farrier looks at that foot, and that foot isn't directly below a relaxed free falling limb when he looks, the farrier will never get that foot balanced, no way, no how, and that is the biggest mistake made.
     
    02-22-2010, 06:47 PM
  #27
Trained
Well, we need to trim a horse's heels evenly and suspend him for 6 weeks and then measure again. LOL! :) Oh, my son says we have to do this with several horses to get a good sampling because probably only very few actually grow uneven!
     
    02-22-2010, 06:53 PM
  #28
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthernMama    
Well, we need to trim a horse's heels evenly and suspend him for 6 weeks and then measure again. LOL! :) Oh, my son says we have to do this with several horses to get a good sampling because probably only very few actually grow uneven!
LOL! That would be an interesting experiment. Not sure the horse would appreciate being suspended for 6 weeks though. LOL!
     
    02-22-2010, 06:55 PM
  #29
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthernMama    
Well, we need to trim a horse's heels evenly and suspend him for 6 weeks and then measure again. LOL! :) Oh, my son says we have to do this with several horses to get a good sampling because probably only very few actually grow uneven!
LOL! That would be an interesting experiment. Not sure the horse would appreciate being suspended for 6 weeks though. LOL!

I suppose, theoretically, if we were dealing with a blood flow issue in the foot...meaning there was some damage to the foot like in a laminitic horse...it makes sense in that case that the foot would grow unevenly based on that ******ed blood flow.
     
    02-24-2010, 03:57 AM
  #30
Weanling
I'm sorry if this offends, but you shouldn't touch ur horses heels unless the horse has a club foot. But from what I can see is that it's not, i'm guessing the pictures are of the back foot. There looks to have concavity and they don't look flat, but the heal need to grow and the toe MAY need to be trimmed back bu unless I saw it on the ground and the angle it's hard to tell, the frog looks off. Look at this website
David Farmilo Horse Farrier Farrier Courses Corrective Shoeing Australia South Australia Oakbank Adelaide Hills
     

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