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Hoof help please

This is a discussion on Hoof help please within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category

     
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        01-23-2009, 10:28 AM
      #11
    Foal
    I am absolutely not an expert, but I thought I would throw my 2 cents in based on all the research I have done recently.

    First I don't see why you would need hoof supplements if her hooves are otherwise healthy and she's on a good diet. I'v read lots of your posts so I would assume she is.

    Second, based on the pic of the bottom of her front hoof, she looks to have under run heels and long toes. Like the forward foot syndrome. I'v read a lot about that due to a yearling that seems to be suffering from the same thing. The way I understand to fix this is to trim back the toes each time you trim and leave the heels alone except to ensure they are level. Also from your pic the bar on the left is way longer and appears stretched compared to the other one. Maybe even slightly laid over. Again I am no expert but I have looked at hundreds of pics, videos and articles and if I had to assess the condition of the hoof that would be my opinion.

    If you are noticing some improvement doing it the way you are, I'd continue to do it that way and see what happens.
         
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        01-23-2009, 12:46 PM
      #12
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Twitch2008    
    Second, based on the pic of the bottom of her front hoof, she looks to have under run heels and long toes. Like the forward foot syndrome. I'v read a lot about that due to a yearling that seems to be suffering from the same thing. The way I understand to fix this is to trim back the toes each time you trim and leave the heels alone except to ensure they are level.
    OK -- that the consensus and I agree. I will do that.

    Quote:
    Also from your pic the bar on the left is way longer and appears stretched compared to the other one. Maybe even slightly laid over.
    It's not YET laid over, and was due to be done when I took the pic, but I wanted to take pics before I touched it. And I had noticed the lack of symmetry too... don't know why that is. Her hoof looks level to me... I will check out all of them for that particular trait and see if I can deduce anything.

    Quote:
    If you are noticing some improvement doing it the way you are, I'd continue to do it that way and see what happens.
    I've been thinking that I've been sort of only keeping the status quo for a while now. Hence my post. THank you!
         
        01-23-2009, 03:41 PM
      #13
    Foal
    Hi Northernmamma!

    From what you said about spending time on your horses feet it's paying off. Here's an idea of how to get the frog to grow more. Find some foam pads (If you have an REI or some sort of outdoors store around you, you can buy pieces) Cut the pads into triangles and tape to the bottom of the foot or place in boots, just to cover the frog so that you are adding more frog pressure. By the frog pumping more the horse will grow more hoof, allowing you to take more heel.....do you see where I'm going with this.... If you can take more heel you will be able to bring the balance point back, which inturn will bring the whole foot back toes included.

    Now you can already see that the foot is starting to take some nice shape. I don't think you need hoof supps at all, it's just a matter of the hoof working properly. I won't mention the bars as you stated you were going to be working on them.

    I think you're doing a great job! We all need a little help from time to time. I know I ask my fair share of questions.
         
        01-23-2009, 04:10 PM
      #14
    Trained
    I can't offer any advice other than to maybe PM Barefoothooves on here. She's just a doll and has helped me out a lot!!! She's usually got spot on advice and she does this for a living. My 2
         
        01-23-2009, 04:42 PM
      #15
    Started
    What I have read and the way I understand it is you keep the toes backed up and a strong roll or bevel. Balance the hoof and while not letting the heels run under further don't try pulling them back too far/low. Since you trim yourself you can nick them up often to help the process. My mare, Heidi came with a tendency to run under big time. Also to flare at the quarters.. And she's pigeon toed. LOL Her hooves are looking much better now, tho she will always be pigeon toed. Barefoothooves is my trimmer, btw.. Have you checked her site out?
         
        01-24-2009, 10:56 AM
      #16
    Trained
    Sorry this took me so long to do this :( I've been so busy!

    Okay first off he feet have a very nice shape! Good job! I don't think she needs a hoof supplement. The only thing I can see is that you need to leave more heel. Can you see the difference in the right hind to the left front? There is much more heal and therefore the angle looks much more normal. Overall I think you are doing a pretty good job, just lean to leave some heal on her. Don't except that it will change with the first trim though. It took a good year for our mares feet to look normal after she had no heal.

    Kudos to you for leaning this yourself! You are doing great!
         
        01-24-2009, 11:00 PM
      #17
    Weanling
    First, don't get in a hurry to see a lot of changes. Time is your best friend on this.
    Next, when she walks, how does she land? Is she stubbing her toe in the dirt, or landing heel first or at least flat? How she's moving will tell you a lot about what you need to do, even if it's just doing what you are already for a while longer.
    What I see that I DO like, is there isn't a lot of flaring, nor is there a pancake flat foot. You might even be snubbing back the toe a tad more than necessary on the hinds, or does your horse drag her toe to make them "bullnosed" on her own? At any rate, the hinds look okay, angle wise.
    For the fronts, it looks like you do have a bit too much heel, and it is shooting forward on you instead of widening out to let the frog get enough contact, which may very well be why you struggled with thrush, but that could be the chicken/egg scenario.
    So, if I were you, I'd probably bevel the heels down a little. Just about 1/16th of an inch to start with, then make sure your bars aren't sticking out above the hoof wall, and leave it at that for now. In about a month, check to see if there's any sole starting to shed in the seat of corns, and if so, take the heels down a tad farther, maybe another 1/16th of an inch.
    The reason I suggest this, is by looking at the collateral grooves, the sole appears to have more than enough depth at the heels, too much, in fact, and that is really what's raising your heels up. She also appears to have adequate depth at the apex of the frog, so you shouldn't be risking a sole bruise in that area as long as you don't trim the sole or over shorten the toe walls. Just maintain the toe as it is, and only lower the heels.
    Clear as mud? If you need me clear that up, PM or email me.
         

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