hoof obsessed, too
 
 

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hoof obsessed, too

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  • Obsessed horse hooves

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  • 1 Post By princessfluffybritches

 
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    10-25-2012, 05:43 PM
  #1
Yearling
hoof obsessed, too

Hi. I go by pfb for short. I have lots of hoof pics and questions and I now do my own trimming thanks to the last 3 farrier I've had. Gotta go to work! Be back soon!
     
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    10-26-2012, 03:27 AM
  #2
Foal
Hi PFB and welcome!

I was basically in the same boat as you 3 months ago and there are a lot of very knowledgeable people here when it comes to hooves. They've given me a lot of help along they way, including directing me to these websites (to name a few):

Bare Foot Horse
Pete Ramey hoof care laminitis founder horse navicular disease thrush equine foot development farrier
Barefoot Hoof Care - Page 1
Iron Free Hoof
     
    10-26-2012, 08:45 AM
  #3
Yearling
Thanks, Lunavi. I've read all that-good reading and got me on my way. I have also learned alot from farriers that's helped as well.

I've had a farrier try to "fix" my horse's toe out stance by leaving the medial 1/2 inch higher than the outside. I had one trim with a loooong toe , he said my gaited horse needed a long toe. Then this last one decided that all his customers needed a "pillar" trim, where the horse is supported by 4 "pillars". Then he brought her heels back to the widest part of the frog even tho it gave her a broken back angle.

So I'm here because from reading posts, it seems like there's a bunch of members who are really concerned about how a horse is trimmed and want their horse trimmed the right way and help eachother out.

So I'll dig thru my pictures and find some hair raising examples,LOL
     
    10-26-2012, 04:26 PM
  #4
Yearling
Here's the last professional farrier trim!
augeleventrim pictures by kseminolewind - Photobucket
     
    10-26-2012, 08:09 PM
  #5
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by princessfluffybritches    
Here's the last professional farrier trim!
augeleventrim pictures by kseminolewind - Photobucket
How...odd...I wonder what the farrier's thought process was on that shape. The leverage on those toes must have been terrible. It also looks like the frog's been heavily trimmed. I'm sure your girl would be more comfortable with a more competent trim.

I have a TWH, and I've never been told of him needing a long toe (and I'd think they're crazy), he gets trimmed just like my QH/Morgan. With a lot of much appreciated help from here my QH/Morgan has gone from this at the end of July (11 days out of a trim):


To this (last week):


...all with the help of this forum (and lots of reading!). Do you have new pics of your girl's hooves?
     
    10-26-2012, 09:49 PM
  #6
Trained
Doing well Lunavi!

Welcome PFB. You should enjoy it here. I think we're a pretty respectful bunch here & can put forward differences of opinions without getting 'narky' usually, which is great, esp for an internet forum, IME! There are quite a few 'hoof obsessed' people here for you to feel at home with & a number of well educated & experienced trimmers & farriers here to help you if you wish.

Of the pics - good shots BTW - it appears that your farrier may have trimmed for the pastern/hoof angle to be straight, which is one good principle & what he seems to have achieved.... on the surface - It appears that the entire toe walls are stretched way forward, so means the pedal bone is likely pointing steeply down into the ground. It also appears the hoof capsule is very short & bony column likely very low in the capsule. I'd personally want radiographs of these feet if she were mine.

*If/when you get rads, get the vet to mark the sole at apex of the frog & the dorsal wall. It's also helpful if the horse can stand on a board with nails a particular distance apart(or some such), for accuracy of measurements.
     
    10-27-2012, 08:56 AM
  #7
Yearling
Thanks, Loosie and Lunavi.
These were taken in August. I trimmed her hooves for 3 years. The past three years I moved her to a barn, and naturally, thought a professional farrier would do a better job. Then I noticed her pastern was getting crooked, and her hooves were jamming on the inside.

Next farrier was cutting her way short. I don't like near blood trims. The next farrier did a balanced job, but since he involved with gaited show horses, he left the toes too long. Then he flat out disappeared leaving 1/2 a barn of clients hanging!

So, next farrier insisted that she needed to be 1/2 inch higher on the insides to straighten her legs out.

So I went back to the "too short" one. Now I'm back to me, still in the process of getting her back on track.

The rundown on the pics:
#1, the pic makes the angles look better than they were. For reference, he was leaving her 47-48 degree angles, and telling me they were 52 degrees!

#2, same farrier read that in Saudi Arabia, they trim their race horses with 4 pillar trims and run them bare foot. So he started trimming hooves that way. I still don't get why he needed to leave the toes so long.

#4, he really scalped those quarters-totally.

#7. Why are they all balancing her hooves from a front view when from the knee down they turn out. It took me a while to figure that one out.

#9 totally wrong. That long toe is causing a dip half way up the hoof by leverage.
#10 scalped quarters

#12. The real center front is not where he put the center front. The jamming is a remnant from the farrier that trimmed her hooves 1/2 inch higher on the inside. Now, wouldn't an intelligent farrier see the jamming, and the frog being pushed over? Or one heel bulb higher than the other?

Last pic. My hoof obsessed gf used this farrier for 4 years. But when she saw this foot, she never called him again.

This next group of pics was taken about a week after the previous pictures. It was my first trim towards where her hooves should be. Not real good, but it was a start.

augtwentytwelve pictures by kseminolewind - Photobucket

I'll have to take pics this week and you can help guide me thru this.
Oh yea. The blood is mine, LOL
Thanks.
     
    10-27-2012, 07:09 PM
  #8
Trained
It would be easier if you could include the pics here, rather than having to go elsewhere to find them. It also helps if you could lable them 'LF', 'RF', etc

I recommend you look into any workshops & courses that may be available in your area, as the more you can learn the better, & hands-on help is best. If not... or as well, I really recommend Pete Ramey's 'Under the Horse' DVD set is well worth it - that's like a comprehensive 3 day clinic packed full of great information which I've found is really helpful for people to understand the principles behind any application. I keep a copy to loan to clients who want to learn more.

Just some thoughts on your comments & pics...
Quote:
Originally Posted by princessfluffybritches    
#1, the pic makes the angles look better than they were. For reference, he was leaving her 47-48 degree angles, and telling me they were 52 degrees!
He was obviously measuring different angles to you. While knowing what 'average' angles & lengths are & knowing what your horse's are can be helpful, I don't get hung up on angles & specific measurements. *However I think it's vital to understand *why* whatever is right is right in a certain horse/situation. Eg. Understand the principles, factors & what lies beneath.

Quote:
#4, he really scalped those quarters-totally.
Don't know what 'scalped' means - taking it to mean the way they're not on the ground. While it appears it may not have been done well & I can't tell from those pics whether it was too much, etc, this is one of the 'good points' IMO, as quarters shouldn't be level with heel & toe *generally*(horses are different in this too). In your pics you've done the same to that back foot.

Quote:
#7. Why are they all balancing her hooves from a front view when from the knee down they turn out. It took me a while to figure that one out.
It actually looks like she may be turned out from further up - her elbow or such. Also looks like she's a bit valgus from the knees.

Quote:
#12. The real center front is not where he put the center front.
Can't tell from these pics, although if pic 14 is the same foot(without getting into long & squared toe), it looks like he's squared the toe in a balanced way, considering the midline of the foot - not that that is always right without exceptions either IMO.

The jamming is a remnant from the farrier that trimmed her hooves 1/2 inch higher on the inside. Now, wouldn't an intelligent farrier see the jamming, and the frog being pushed over? Or one heel bulb higher than the other?

Of your own pics, looks like you've made a reasonable start. If this was your first trim, you've done well. My opinions from what I can see...

Heels and quarters have been left too long - front heels are a tad high, while backs are long but crushed forward.

Toes are *possibly* a little short from the ground level, definitely in that 10th pic, but stretched forward & in need of bevelling, esp back feet.

Especially from the 9th & 10th pics, it appears that the hooves aren't trimmed in balance, but of course, not sure how they were before your trim & there are other considerations which mean that just going off these pics may not give me an accurate view.

Anyway, hope all that was some help to you! Time to go & play with my own horses now.... for a change!
     
    10-27-2012, 07:51 PM
  #9
Yearling
Thanks, Loosie. You're helping me in a big way. And it's much to consider when I physically look at her, and think about your points. I know cameras can do really strange things to pictures.

Yes, the angle/degrees are a reference, or I use them as communication because of the camera distortion.

The quarters scalped? LOL. I think some relief is what's needed, not an all out chopping the sides off the hooves.



It will be nice to trim them now and then get some guidance and comments.
Thanks!
loosie likes this.
     

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