Hoof pads for asphalt riding? Suggestions?
   

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Hoof pads for asphalt riding? Suggestions?

This is a discussion on Hoof pads for asphalt riding? Suggestions? within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Ground control horseshoes without frog support
  • Horse shock pads for riding horses on hardtop

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  • 1 Post By PaintHorseMares
  • 1 Post By loosie
  • 1 Post By Patty Stiller

 
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    11-11-2013, 07:39 PM
  #1
Foal
Hoof pads for asphalt riding? Suggestions?

Due to the nature of where I live we have to do A LOT of riding on asphalt. Before anyone jumps all over this, just please understand I do my best to find soft surfaces to ride but arenas are non-existent here and there are only a few trails a couple miles away and the beach a few miles away so to get anywhere soft requires a lot of road riding. It took me years (riding other peoples horses here) to get used to this and it's still like nails on a chalkboard to me when we go any faster than a walk on the road.

My horse has great feet and although she's new to me I found a farrier who I think has done a wonderful job so far. He put her in shoes with clips on the back which I did hear can help with impact. My question was if anyone had experience with using pads in addition to shoes to help with the shock absorption. I started doing a little research and the 'Shock Tamer' pads look decent, but lots of people seem to recommend the leather pads as well (and they're much cheaper). All things equal I'd much prefer a rim pad, I don't really like the idea of covering the whole frog or sole with our damp weather.

I'm going to ask the farrier his thoughts the next time he's out here, but I know it's not common practice here and he'll probably think I'm crazy. ;)

Any feedback or experience with either of these products?
     
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    11-11-2013, 07:55 PM
  #2
Green Broke
Just a question....why do you shoe your horse? I ride on asphalt roads all the time, all our horses are barefoot, and it's no problem at all.
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    11-11-2013, 08:11 PM
  #3
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaintHorseMares    
Just a question....why do you shoe your horse? I ride on asphalt roads all the time, all our horses are barefoot, and it's no problem at all.
I have considered that option, I've always shoed my horses, but have been researching barefoot more lately. The gelding we boarded with didn't have shoes and after only two weeks of riding, about an hour 2x a week, he was wearing down his hooves so much that when the farrier came to shoe he said it was almost to the bloodline. I'm just worried that would happen with her...?
     
    11-11-2013, 09:01 PM
  #4
Weanling
I agree with the barefoot option but I've always kept my horses barefoot. It may not work for your horse or it may work great, you can always take them off and watch her closely. I rarely have to have the farrier out for my pony as I also ride on asphalt a lot and it naturally wears her hooves down at a healthy rate.
Sorry I don't have any word for what you actually asked, just thought I would add my thoughts in.
     
    11-11-2013, 09:58 PM
  #5
Foal
Thanks guys for both- it's good to hear about your experiences on asphalt either way. I do know the grip with barefoot is supposed to be much better- she slips and slides a lot on the road in shoes.
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    11-11-2013, 10:03 PM
  #6
Yearling
Try ground control horseshoes. They wear harder than iron and no slipping plus shock absorption. I used them on. The theater horses for several years with great success. Farrier s always poo poo them till they see how they wear ;)
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    11-12-2013, 12:31 AM
  #7
Trained
Hi,

Yes, absolutely I'd be using pads if the horse was shod & working on hard ground. I would entertain the thought of full pads, to provide support underneath too. The Ground control shoes are another option, or hoof boots, which will provide full protection without any extra shock.

I'm interested to know the theory of why clips on shoes help shock absorbtion? Never heard that one before & can't understand how it could possibly help.

Re wearing bare feet down to the quick, yes, this can happen but it is not a general problem especially if hooves are healthy to begin with & are built up gradually to longer periods on abrasive ground, as the hooves will grow as much as needed to keep up. However, that's not the whole story, or practical for all, so the fact is, many horses will need extra protection in at least some situations. If your mare has such good feet there's a fair chance she'd manage fine bare, but you could also boot part time, to prevent excessive wear until her feet 'catch up' with the new situation.
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    11-15-2013, 11:16 AM
  #8
Weanling
Quote:
I have considered that option, I've always shoed my horses, but have been researching barefoot more lately. The gelding we boarded with didn't have shoes and after only two weeks of riding, about an hour 2x a week, he was wearing down his hooves so much that when the farrier came to shoe he said it was almost to the bloodline. I'm just worried that would happen with her...?
A short, well worn foot is a healthy foot as long as the horse is not tender footed if this horse was sound the all that was happening was the foot was wearing own to where it was supposed to be, at the level of the sole. Asphalt is the best hoof trimmer/conditioner there is.

That said , shoes that are fit to the rim of the foot *without frog support* increase the impact of the pavement. The back of the frog is supposed to come in contact with the ground at the same time as the heels of the foot or shoe if the hose is shod. So the best solution to help keep the foot healthy is to either leave in ALL the dirt that fills the foot to the bottom (in other words do not pick them out) Or substitute an artificial substance for the dirt. This means one of several options
1) fill the entire bottom of the foot with a supportive shock absorbing material such as "Equipack" .
Or
2) use a full pad with an artificial frog support built in (several kinds on the market) and fill under it with a sole packing material .

Do NOT USE a rim pad because that only decreases of function of the frog even more and will contribute to contracted heels.
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    11-15-2013, 11:27 AM
  #9
Showing
If you stay to a walk on the asphalt the horse should be fine barefoot. I've seen videos of shod TWH really motoring along on asphalt and it stands my hair on end because the pounding can cause road founder. If you go with shoes and pads, be sure your farrier is familiar with the different materials or the horse may wind up with thrush. Clips in the area of the heels don't allow the heels to expand.
     

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