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Hoof Pictures, How is he?

This is a discussion on Hoof Pictures, How is he? within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Barefoot hoof east texas

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    06-13-2013, 11:51 PM
  #21
Showing
Okay, armed with all of this information I will definitely pass it along to my friend when the other farrier comes to take a look.

Thank you so much Kayella! I hope one day he can be barefoot again..
     
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    06-14-2013, 09:49 AM
  #22
Foal
According to the vets and farrier he does not have active thrush. He has the seperation that is trying to grow out. I've been treating it as per the vets (2 of them to date) instructions. His hooves normally grow slowly but have started to pick up in speed in how fast they grow. We have been using the current farrier since the end of January and moved barns (where there is no mud what-so-ever) in March.
     
    06-15-2013, 03:04 AM
  #23
Trained
I agree with a lot of what has already been stated - he needs a good trim. If it hasn't already been stated, his bars need some attention as they appear to be on their way to laying over on some or too long on others. I would also want to trim off as much of that "indention/crack" w in his hind and keep it well beveled and trimmed w patience as it grows out. I would bet all his footsies will look lovely after a few good trims.

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    06-15-2013, 10:32 AM
  #24
Weanling
I'm going to have to politely disagree on trimming the bars. The bars will end up growing forward, sometimes all the way to the tip of the frog, to help support a thin sole. You can get a good idea of how thick a sole is by measuring the depth of the valley that is along side the frog. You can see that at the heel how deep the valley is, and compared to the valley at the tip of the frog, it's much shallower. If you take off the bars you'll instantly be removing some support for the thinner areas of the sole.

And if it hasn't already been mentioned, leave the sole alone. If you have a farrier that takes out their knife and proceeds towards the sole with it, stop em right away. There are some trimmers that will remove the toe callous, and some that will try to create a little more concavity with their knife. This is not a good idea, and there is no reason to be doing it. Make sure they leave the frog alone too. Again, some farriers like to take their knife and thin down the frog, this also is a bad idea.

As for your horse being, "dead lame", if the shoes are removed.....hogwash. It's probable he will be sore as he begins using new muscles and tendons, but he will adapt. And only time will let you know how long it's going to take. It's the same as if I've been sitting around all winter on my butt for 6 months and the all of a sudden come spring I hop up and take off for a run. I'm going to be sore afterwards, and there's no way around it, I have to get my body conditioned again to handle all that movement. Expecting to be at 100% instantly is asking for too much.
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    06-15-2013, 11:27 AM
  #25
Trained
There seems to be many schools of thought about the length of bars and their function w respect to support, however, laying over is different and interferes with the sole growth above it, IMO. Kind of "chicken and the egg"...does the sole thin above an overlaid bar b/c of the bar's interference, or does the bar lay over to protect a thinning sole? In either case, I personally want the sole to ultimately toughen/thicken in response to direct contact w the ground which might take special care/thought as you proceed if you suspect it is thin in one or all areas, granted.
     
    06-15-2013, 12:12 PM
  #26
Green Broke
I've always thought laid over bars can jam up the sole underneath them and prevent growth?
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    06-15-2013, 06:33 PM
  #27
Weanling
Do you guys have any links by chance that I can learn more about why it would be better to trim the bars? I try to be open to learn as much as I can, as I find the more educated I am the better decisions I can make.

I would also like to share a link that does a pretty good job explaining as to why I mentioned to leave the bars alone. New Page 6 I just see no excessive amount of bar that justifies trimming em off. IMO, the horse would transition better to shoeless with less ouchiness if the bars are left alone in this situation.

Either way though it isn't going to be too detrimental if the bars are trimmed. And if they pop right back though at the next trim in six weeks then it's a good indication to leave em alone. And you'll only be maybe 3-4 weeks behind on getting the hoof to where it needs to be.
     
    06-15-2013, 10:46 PM
  #28
Green Broke
Even Pete Ramey says that there's a fine line between too much bar and not enough. I think one of the biggest debates on feet is "To trim or not to trim?" with the bars in question. I can see how bars offer heel support and strength, but at the same time too much can cause jamming up into the hoof capsule and result in heel pain. Then the horse would be landing toe first to avoid putting pressure on the heels.

This isn't so much a factual article, but it demonstrates what I believe with pictures and describes it better than I can hehe.

Treating Navicular Syndrome without Horseshoes--thumbnail photos

That being said, I don't think Sky's bars are overgrown at all. They splay out from the frog, but that shows thin soles. They look to be even with the sole, if not a bit taller than the sole. The only time I would trim a bar is when they start to lay over and risk jamming up into the hoof capsule. But again, I'm still learning so I'm open to any and all opinions. I did text my farrier and ask him what he does in regards to bars. I know he trims them as he's done it to my yearling, but I want to get his opinion on it.
     
    06-15-2013, 11:01 PM
  #29
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by totalfreedom    
Do you guys have any links by chance that I can learn more about why it would be better to trim the bars? I try to be open to learn as much as I can, as I find the more educated I am the better decisions I can make.

I would also like to share a link that does a pretty good job explaining as to why I mentioned to leave the bars alone. New Page 6 I just see no excessive amount of bar that justifies trimming em off. IMO, the horse would transition better to shoeless with less ouchiness if the bars are left alone in this situation.

Either way though it isn't going to be too detrimental if the bars are trimmed. And if they pop right back though at the next trim in six weeks then it's a good indication to leave em alone. And you'll only be maybe 3-4 weeks behind on getting the hoof to where it needs to be.
from your link:
Does this mean we should just leave the bars alone? Unfortunately it's not that easy. Like any other part of the foot, excess bar length can cause many problems, so we're still left with our usual "tightrope walk"; always teetering on a very fine line between too aggressive and too conservative.

I said some of the bars are on their way to laying over..and they are, IMO. And, it can be arrested - I didn't mean by aggressive removal of them below the sole surface or something. I personally am pretty conservative about trimming bars, and have had this conversation in a much earlier post (which school of thought is best - to leave them longer than the sole for support, or the conventional wisdom of "with the sole"). As I have said in earlier posts, I go somewhere in-between. When there are so many schools of thought on the subject...the only thing one can say with surety is - it boils down to personal opinion for a given horse's situation.

Also, in a much earlier post I had pictures of my filly's feet when I first got her with bars/sole material to the toe and hoof wall. My main concern was the thinness of her sole after all that material had been "protecting" her sole for an unknown amount of time, but I wanted them trimmed down to some workable level - and she was in forgiving soft sand. I kept the bars trimmed, they now are more "erect" (exposing more of the sole), do not pop back, and do not lay over at such a severe angle and her feet/soles are now beyond hard. I did not achieve that over night, but it wouldn't have happened at all if I hadn't of persistently trimmed them a tad more than I ordinarily would, or currently do for her.
     
    06-15-2013, 11:39 PM
  #30
Weanling
Thank you both for questioning me and having a differing opinion. It has opened my eyes more to the special situations where one would warrant the need to trim the bars. I too don't think that the bars should always be left alone, but I didn't think it was necessary in this case......But I now understand much clearer as to where you both are coming from in regards to Sky's hooves.

You know what I'm really enjoying about us questioning each other...........in the end we have the same goal......to have a healthy, happy, functioning, barefoot horse. I recall years ago when I joined this site there were more people who were against barefoot, and many of them would chime in on a barefoot topic and say we were stupid for going barefoot. This puts a smile on my face to see that more of us are sharing our barefoot experience and proving it is an excellent way to keep a horse.
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