Hoof that's TOO moisturized? - The Horse Forum

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post #1 of 12 Old 03-09-2014, 05:46 PM Thread Starter
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Hoof that's TOO moisturized?

It seems that everyone's trying to find the right balance between a hoof that isn't dry and brittle, and one that isn't overly saturated with moisture. It seems people put on all the different hoof dressings and conditioners during the dry months, like winter, when the horses feet are a little dry, and maybe have a few cracks. But what do you do when it's mucky and wet outside when those dressings won't really help, and your horses hooves are TOO moisturized? (for lack of a better word)?

Now I know of course diet is always so important for healthy hooves, however I feel as though that can't help when your horse is standing out in a wet field after snow has melted or it's rained, and their hooves seem to have soaked up all the moisture.

What's everybody's thoughts on this? Any preventative measures for this kinda thing or things you can do?
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post #2 of 12 Old 03-09-2014, 06:00 PM
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Hello,
One of the easiest ways to help out the horse who is having problems with overly moist hooves is to simply try to create at least one area they can get into that is dry.
Try using sand or gravel and building up an area that will have improved drainage and stay nice and dry.
Always be sure to pick out your horse's hooves as often as possible to allow air to get to the frog and sole. This will help with dreaded thrush and bacterial infections.
So what if you were to late and your horse has thrush? Simply apply a thrush removing product, or use a bleach/water spray. A great way to help thrush with out worrying about staining is athletes foot spray, and the cream works wonders for split bulbs. Just be sure to get the commisures and sole as clean as possible first.
Hope this helps all of you out!
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post #3 of 12 Old 03-09-2014, 06:06 PM
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Traditional hoof dressings actually dry out hooves, sealing environmental moisture out (to a point). Newer, oil-based dressings moisturise.

Environment is as critical as nutrition, for sure.
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post #4 of 12 Old 03-09-2014, 06:07 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MandiFree View Post
Hello,
One of the easiest ways to help out the horse who is having problems with overly moist hooves is to simply try to create at least one area they can get into that is dry.
Try using sand or gravel and building up an area that will have improved drainage and stay nice and dry.
Always be sure to pick out your horse's hooves as often as possible to allow air to get to the frog and sole. This will help with dreaded thrush and bacterial infections.
So what if you were to late and your horse has thrush? Simply apply a thrush removing product, or use a bleach/water spray. A great way to help thrush with out worrying about staining is athletes foot spray, and the cream works wonders for split bulbs. Just be sure to get the commisures and sole as clean as possible first.
Hope this helps all of you out!
Haha I'd never thought about using athlete's foot treatments for thrush before. That's cool, thanks!
And ya, my horse thankfully likes staying in the shelter in her field which does remain drier than the rest of it during the yucky months. There's a few little hills so it's drier at the top of them as most of the water drains down.
That's all very good advice, thanks!
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post #5 of 12 Old 03-09-2014, 06:10 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hemms View Post
Traditional hoof dressings actually dry out hooves, sealing environmental moisture out (to a point). Newer, oil-based dressings moisturise.

Environment is as critical as nutrition, for sure.
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So what are they type of hoof dressings that dry them out? I feel like every time I go to a tack store all the products that are labeled as hoof dressings say that they help condition the hooves
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post #6 of 12 Old 03-09-2014, 06:34 PM
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If a horse is truly stuck in a really excessively wet environment I like to seal the hoof walls with one of the varnish type hoof sealers . Good ones are Keratex, or Tuff Stuff. In a pinch, even just hoof polish can help.

I am curious what do you members in the UK use? I have seen some of the water logged hooves there.
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post #7 of 12 Old 03-09-2014, 06:55 PM
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I believe that the periopole creates this varnish like substance that waterproofs the hooves. Creams do nothing. However, I have seen that packing the sole with (booey) clay or some moisturous hoof packing absorbs the moisture and you can actually see the difference in the whole hoof.
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post #8 of 12 Old 03-09-2014, 07:04 PM
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speaking from a farrier based history and scientific knowledge, creams and sealants can sometimes do more damage than good. A hoof will naturally correct is ph balance which affects the moisture content of the hoof. Creams are good on hooves that are dry and cracked but harmful on a sound hoof. Sealants also can be problematic because while they can seal moisture out, they also seal whatever moisture is currently there, in.
Hope this helps with the cream/sealant issue. Also, I use mane n tail hoof maker- smells nice and is approved for human use as well :)
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post #9 of 12 Old 03-09-2014, 07:08 PM
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As said, unless absolutely not possible the horse should have a dry area. Of course even with that I can see how some areas may get too wet and short of say locking the horse in a stall 24/7 they would be standing in water.
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post #10 of 12 Old 03-09-2014, 07:10 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MandiFree View Post
speaking from a farrier based history and scientific knowledge, creams and sealants can sometimes do more damage than good. A hoof will naturally correct is ph balance which affects the moisture content of the hoof. Creams are good on hooves that are dry and cracked but harmful on a sound hoof. Sealants also can be problematic because while they can seal moisture out, they also seal whatever moisture is currently there, in.
Hope this helps with the cream/sealant issue. Also, I use mane n tail hoof maker- smells nice and is approved for human use as well :)
I use that too! But I agree completely with what you just said about it naturally balancing out. I always try to never put to much of it on, and only when I noticeably see that my horses hooves are dry and cracking, which is pretty much only in the winter. Otherwise I try not to do too much with her feet
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