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Hoof Trim Critique (picture heavy)

This is a discussion on Hoof Trim Critique (picture heavy) within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • My horses hoof broke off and it looks like the inner part is exposed
  • Farrier, trimming old weak horse

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    09-21-2011, 11:14 AM
  #11
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annnie31    
... Im no farrier but your horse is going to have serious issues if he doesnt already.
Probably not. While it may appear "serious" to the inexperienced, you'd be surprised how nicely those feet would clean up in a single trim.

Quote:
Its been my experience that farriers who do this kind of work arent likely to take advice very well unfortunately.
A farrier didn't do this work.

Cheers,
Mark
     
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    09-21-2011, 03:55 PM
  #12
Yearling
You're all right, a farrier did not do this trim (neither did I!).
These pictures are from when my barn owner (not a farrier) trimmed my horse's feet, for free, and I'm just checking to see if I'd let them again; I was already pretty sure I wouldn't.
The horse is sound right now, so no 'serious' issues.
I apply cornucrescine hoof moisturizer 3-4 times per week (as much as I'm at the barn). I fed farrier's formula for a while but the hoof grew out way, way too fast and weak. Someone mentioned flax, I don't see how that would necessarily help the hooves?
Thanks for all the replies.
     
    09-21-2011, 04:53 PM
  #13
Foal
I just did a quick Google search about Flax seeds, and here is what I found..
BOSS is also good...








FLAX SEED FACTS

Flax (linseed) has many wonderful benefits for horses and humans alike.
Flaxseed is unique among feeds because of its high concentration of Omega 3 [COLOR=blue !important][COLOR=blue !important]fatty [COLOR=blue !important]acids[/COLOR][/COLOR][/COLOR], including alpha-linolenic acid. Horses need a minimum level of key fats to maintain good health. These essential fatty acids are Omega 3 and Omega 6. A horse cannot produce these fats in their body, thus they are an essential part of his diet.
Characteristics of a lack of [COLOR=blue !important][COLOR=blue !important]essential [COLOR=blue !important]fatty [/COLOR][COLOR=blue !important]acids[/COLOR][/COLOR][/COLOR] may include, dull coat with dry itchy skin and cracking hooves.
Flax also is a rich source of fibre, especially soluble fibre which gels when exposed to water (similar to psyllium). It is helpful in preventing impaction and sand colic as the fibre swells and the gel like consistency traps and suspends sand, bringing it out of the system. The fibre is rich in lignans, substances believed to be linked to the cancer fighting effects of a high fibre diet. It also has anti-viral, anti-fungal and anti-bacterial properties.
Flaxseed is 26% protein and rich in amino acids like methionine and lysine. It has good levels of [COLOR=blue !important][COLOR=blue !important]antioxidants[/COLOR][/COLOR], including vitamin E and is a good source of magnesium and phosphorous.
     
    09-21-2011, 04:53 PM
  #14
Teen Forum Moderator
OP-

From what I understand, flax is extremely rich in Omega-3, something that is found in fresh grass. It's normally used to bring a healthy glow to a horse's coat, but it also known to help condition a horse's hooves. It might be worth a try.

A few different things that I've done and have seen done over the years are usage of Linseed oil and Wintergreen oil. They're both helpful for returning moisture to the hoof, and can work as a sort of 'chapstick' to sooth cracks.

You might want to try something other than what you have right now, since it is quite obviousle not do it's job well. If you just want to buy something, I've heard good about Rainmaker and Hooflex as a topical, and I've also heard that Biotin is a good oral suppliment if you can give it to them every day. There are plenty of suppliments out there, you just have to look and choose, then go by trial and error to find what works for your horse.

Edit:Bay Lee beat me to it! Haha ;) still check out the other ideas, also.
Bay Lee likes this.
     
    09-21-2011, 11:10 PM
  #15
Trained
Yes, get an actual farrier / trimmer to do your horses feet. They are in need of a trim now. (So I wonder just what exactly your BO did... hmmm...) It looks possibly like those hooves were in serious overgrowth not too long ago and that may explain so much cracking.

With a proper trim now and maintenance I don't see those hooves as being a problem at all. Biotin in the diet will help with hoof health and general mineral supplements. You want to get some good strong growth coming down and then the cracks will slowly grow out, but it will take at least several months, maybe over a year. Each horse is different for growth rates.

I would not apply anything external to the hooves. Combat unhealthy hooves with a healthier diet, not makeup.
     
    09-22-2011, 01:32 AM
  #16
Trained
Hi,

Just a quick note & haven't read replies, so sorry if I repeat... From what can be told of those pics, nice, healthy, strong looking frogs!

Firstly, are you absolutely sure the horse was trimmed but 2 hrs previously?? Perhaps the fronts were 'rolled' a bit(except maybe the outside left), but apart from that, esp the backs, there is no real evidence of a recent trim IMO. Of course, with only those pics to go on, could be wrong, but if they were, esp backs, it wasn't a good one. Hope it's not some 'professional's' eg.... Perhaps you trimmed them yourself(before going on a long abrasive trim that took care of evidence...), but I'm afraid I'd advise not doing it again unless under guidance of a *good* trimmer/farrier. While fronts aren't terrible(tho there are issues still), backs need much more/different.

Be helpful to see the sole on an angle, to better gauge depth / wall height. Quarters(both ground surface & flares) & bars appear undealt with particularly. What's the horse's history? Be interested to see before shots. What's his diet/nutrition like? Environment? Has it been recently long-term wet & just dried out or such? IME those kind of cracks are most often a sign of diet/nutrition probs, &/or of using some kind of topical that has robbed the wall of it's outer protective layer, so allowed it to dry out excessively &/or the horse has been standing long term in mud without respite - altho I wouldn't think the last in this instance. If you've been using topical goop of any kind, I'd quit that, for starters.
     
    09-22-2011, 04:52 AM
  #17
Yearling
Sorry, I forgot to mention in my last post (on my way out the door) that the farrier didn't show for the appointment, that's why the BO offered to trim for me. To loosie, yes, I'm positive on the time, I was holding my horse while it was done. We went for a ride right after the trim, before I took the pics, so maybe that's why it doesn't look recent?
Looking at the pictures again though, it didn't seem so obvious in person, it doesn't seem like she took much off at all. Hmm. Calling around for farriers in the morning I suppose.

His hooves have always been dry/cracked, but never deep cracks. The farrier I was using before told me that since they were only surface cracks they were nothing to worry about. I suppose I should be a little more pro-active about them considering the responses to this thread!
     
    09-22-2011, 08:34 AM
  #18
Weanling
Flax seed does help with dry feet. We have been feeding it daily for the past 8 months to a mare that had dry feet and her feet have done a complete 360 to normal and healthy. Feed it and give it some time and you will see great results.
     
    09-22-2011, 11:41 AM
  #19
Green Broke
I'm wondering what the feet looked like before the 'trim' if they look like that afterwards. Something is being neglected in this horse's hoof care. Hooves shouldn't look like petrified wood.
     
    09-22-2011, 11:45 AM
  #20
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by aspin231    
You're all right, a farrier did not do this trim (neither did I!).
These pictures are from when my barn owner (not a farrier) trimmed my horse's feet, for free, and I'm just checking to see if I'd let them again; I was already pretty sure I wouldn't.
The horse is sound right now, so no 'serious' issues.
I apply cornucrescine hoof moisturizer 3-4 times per week (as much as I'm at the barn). I fed farrier's formula for a while but the hoof grew out way, way too fast and weak. Someone mentioned flax, I don't see how that would necessarily help the hooves?
Thanks for all the replies.
A hoof cannot grow out too fast if you're having them trimmed every 6-8 weeks. They may get weak if allowed to get too long. How often are they being trimmed?
     

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