Hoof Trimming- Correct Toeing Out or Not?
 
 

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Hoof Trimming- Correct Toeing Out or Not?

This is a discussion on Hoof Trimming- Correct Toeing Out or Not? within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • How to correct toeing out on a horse
  • Trimming hoof to straighten

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    08-15-2011, 04:06 AM
  #1
Yearling
Hoof Trimming- Correct Toeing Out or Not?

I've heard different opinions on this, and would like other educated or otherwise professional ideas on this matter.

If a horse toes out (specifically in the front feet for the purposes of this question) like this ( Google Images ), but is sound, would you use corrective trimming to 'straighten them out'? Meaning, rasp the inside wall down further than the outside wall to make their legs appear straight until the hoof grows out again?

Would that 'torque' the leg too much, or is it of benefit?

Thanks.
     
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    08-15-2011, 11:24 AM
  #2
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by aspin231    
... would you use corrective trimming to 'straighten them out'? Meaning, rasp the inside wall down further than the outside wall to make their legs appear straight until the hoof grows out again?

Would that 'torque' the leg too much, or is it of benefit?

Thanks.
The image presents an example of a conformational defect called fetlock valgus. "Corrective" trimming is contra-indicated in these cases and, as you have suggested, will create rotational torque.

The carpal, fetlock, pastern and coffin joints (common names) are all ginglymus or "hinge" joints. They are designed to permit motion only in the dorsal/palmar plane.

While there is some medial/lateral "play" in these joints, intentionally creating imbalance in the supportive distal surface of the adult hoof will have a cumulative deleterious effect on the joints of the distal limb.

All that said, the distal limb joints of a foal may allow for some correction in the first few months of life, before ossification of the epiphyseal plates occurs.

In summary, it is generally incorrect to intentionally create medial/lateral imbalance in the hoof.

Cheers,
Mark
     
    08-15-2011, 12:01 PM
  #3
Started
Absolutely agree with Horseman.. Correction can only be accomplished when very young. My mare, Heidi toes in big time. I was told by her breeder she did not when they sold her as a weanling. Whoever had her during the next few months did not take care with her trimming and now her pasterns turn in.. We trim to the sole/hoof not to "prettify".. ;)
     
    08-15-2011, 04:21 PM
  #4
Yearling
Thanks for the information, Mark!
That's pretty much what I had guessed, and I won't, or won't allow, any farriers to 'correctively' trim my horse's feet again.

If anyone else has another opinion on this matter I'm definitely still open to hearing it.
     
    08-15-2011, 04:24 PM
  #5
Banned
Totally agree with Horseman!
     
    08-15-2011, 08:11 PM
  #6
Weanling
Great info thanks! (storing away) i'm like an info hoarder when it comes to horse stuff lmao!
     
    08-15-2011, 08:26 PM
  #7
Foal
The opposite happened to my mini stallion, when we got him our farrier trimmed him too short on the outside for awhile (i was 9 had no idea what was going on) and now he toes out slightly, just enough to be noticeable to those who are around him often...grrrr
     
    08-15-2011, 09:38 PM
  #8
Foal
They can help breakover a bit based on wear pattern of shoe or foot. That doesn't alter balance but makes it easier for the foot to 'turn' over.
     
    08-17-2011, 01:26 AM
  #9
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Horseman56    
The image presents an example of a conformational defect called fetlock valgus. "Corrective" trimming is contra-indicated in these cases and, as you have suggested, will create rotational torque.

The carpal, fetlock, pastern and coffin joints (common names) are all ginglymus or "hinge" joints. They are designed to permit motion only in the dorsal/palmar plane.

While there is some medial/lateral "play" in these joints, intentionally creating imbalance in the supportive distal surface of the adult hoof will have a cumulative deleterious effect on the joints of the distal limb.

All that said, the distal limb joints of a foal may allow for some correction in the first few months of life, before ossification of the epiphyseal plates occurs.

In summary, it is generally incorrect to intentionally create medial/lateral imbalance in the hoof.

Cheers,
Mark
All that from a cartoon picture.?:roll:
loosie likes this.
     
    08-17-2011, 03:50 AM
  #10
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by bntnail    
All that from a cartoon picture.?:roll:
I described the situation as well! Are you of the same opinion as Horseman? I see in your signature that you're a farrier.
     

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