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Horse shoeing question

This is a discussion on Horse shoeing question within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Diagram of horse circulation with and without shoeing

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    05-11-2012, 12:41 AM
  #11
Weanling
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Originally Posted by Shoebox    
Hmm.. I've never heard of that happening! But I have heard mostly not very good things about shoeing.
You believe everything you hear? Think!

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The main one being that shod horses have extremely reduced circulation in their legs (Mostly their foot)
If that were the case, the hooves would fall off shortly after shoeing.

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- This thermograph shows a horse with one hoof shod (Guess which one!)
If you look close there apears to be a shoe on the other foot as well.

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and it definitely isn't getting as much blood as the others.
Are you sure that's what's going on. Look up Sympathetic Nerve Dysfunction. (I'm sooooooo tired of that picture!)

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Also, I've heard that the nail holed can collect dirt and get really infected...
Only if the nails are driven into sensative tissue, not where there supposed to be. As for a "white line" type of infection, barefoot horses get that too.

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I'm not sure how true all of this is,
Not very, mostly propoganda.

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A hoof book I have explains it much better and more professionally, but the cons list is still longer than the benefits list.
Read whatever book you want, most farriers(those that work metal) prefer barefoot. Not all horses can go bare due to pathology or work.

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I don't think the circulation loss would normally be quite this extreme,
I don't either.(rolls eyes)

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Too, one more thing... Hooves are supposed to flex when a horse walks (helps the circulation) -
That's right.

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a horse with a shoe, its hoof couldn't flex properly... Right? Hence, loss of circulation...
In my experience, your thinking is wrong. Of course that is not your thinking,but the thinking of others you have adopted w/o prejudice.
     
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    05-11-2012, 02:57 AM
  #12
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shoebox    
Hmm.. I've never heard of that happening! But I have heard mostly not very good things about shoeing. The main one being that shod horses have extremely reduced circulation in their legs (Mostly their foot) - This thermograph shows a horse with one hoof shod
With respect, I'm not sure that's what that thermograph was showing at all, but that is what many people want it to mean & have put that 'spin' on it. I absolutely understand & sympathise that it is very difficult to come to informed & objective views on the subject when there is so much bias & rubbish out there... on both sides of the fence. It's a matter of learning all you can from as objective & well researched sources as possible on both perspectives, analysing the information & weighing it up. And remaining open minded to further information. And remember there are pros & cons for just about everything.

I do, after much more than just hearing things, believe that shoeing(& otherwise peripherally loading or constricting the foot) - particularly long term - does effect circulation & other things, but IMO 'extremely reduced' would lead to major problems that just don't happen, such as BNT's example. I too believe that the cons of conventional metal rims *generally* outweigh the pros of keeping a horse shoeless(not necessarily bare) *generally speaking*. Looking into Dr Robert Bowker's research will give you some objective studies to go on with.
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    05-11-2012, 07:42 AM
  #13
Green Broke
Well Stan was shod for 17 of his 20 years of life and I can totaly confirm that he never had a problem with his hooves splitting.

Nor did he have reduced circulation to his legs! Nor did he ever have any joint problems or other issues (like splints) that are associated with impacts on the leg (and we did a heck of a lot of road work)
     
    05-11-2012, 02:39 PM
  #14
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shoebox    
Hmm.. I've never heard of that happening! But I have heard mostly not very good things about shoeing. The main one being that shod horses have extremely reduced circulation in their legs (Mostly their foot) - This thermograph shows a horse with one hoof shod (Guess which one!) and it definitely isn't getting as much blood as the others. Also, I've heard that the nail holed can collect dirt and get really infected... I'm not sure how true all of this is, but after a quick readup it didn't sound like what I would want for my horse.

A hoof book I have explains it much better and more professionally, but the cons list is still longer than the benefits list. I don't think the circulation loss would normally be quite this extreme, but still...

Too, one more thing... Hooves are supposed to flex when a horse walks (helps the circulation) - a horse with a shoe, its hoof couldn't flex properly... Right? Hence, loss of circulation...
It would be cruel for me NOT to put shoes on my horses. We have to travel gravel a lot! Oh and just wondering if I wore one shoe and one barefoot what my circulation would look like, lol.
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    05-11-2012, 02:43 PM
  #15
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by nvr2many    
It would be cruel for me NOT to put shoes on my horses. We have to travel gravel a lot! Oh and just wondering if I wore one shoe and one barefoot what my circulation would look like, lol.

Now I would have to agree here, On some of the terrain that I encounter it would be harsh to not have them shod.
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    05-13-2012, 09:24 PM
  #16
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wallee    
Now I would have to agree here, On some of the terrain that I encounter it would be harsh to not have them shod.
Not to *protect* their feet in some way yes, agree 1000% But conventionally shod with steel rims is IMO not the most effective or best option for this in the majority of situations.
     
    05-15-2012, 10:03 AM
  #17
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie    
Not to *protect* their feet in some way yes, agree 1000% But conventionally shod with steel rims is IMO not the most effective or best option for this in the majority of situations.

So what your getting at is hoof boots?
     
    05-15-2012, 10:13 AM
  #18
Green Broke
Hoof boots are not a good long term solution.
I used them on a pony for a while and no matter what brand I used or what size they rubbed the bulb of his heel.

I tried barefoot with him but with the amount of road work we were doing on Tarmac roads without shoes he would have had NO hoof left
     
    05-15-2012, 10:53 AM
  #19
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by faye    
hoof boots are not a good long term solution.
I used them on a pony for a while and no matter what brand I used or what size they rubbed the bulb of his heel.

I tried barefoot with him but with the amount of road work we were doing on Tarmac roads without shoes he would have had NO hoof left

See that's what I am worried about I ride alot of roads and I need to protect my horses hoofs from wear.
     
    05-15-2012, 08:20 PM
  #20
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by faye    
hoof boots are not a good long term solution.
I used them on a pony for a while and no matter what brand I used or what size they rubbed the bulb of his heel.

I tried barefoot with him but with the amount of road work we were doing on Tarmac roads without shoes he would have had NO hoof left
Yes, Wally, I do think hoof boots are *generally* an excellent solution - long term or otherwise. Faye, with respect, you state 'hoof boots are not a good long term solution' because you tried hoof boots on one pony & they rubbed. One example doesn't make for an objective reason for judgement, even anecdotally.

I don't believe there is any one solution that is appropriate for every horse in every situation & some horses & situations are indeed ill suited to hoof boots IMO. Also we don't know the state of the horse's feet, whether they were underrun or such, whether she had gait or conformational issues, whether you used gaiters, pads or inserts which may have been able to resolve the issue, how long your rides were, etc.
     

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