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Horse shoeing question

This is a discussion on Horse shoeing question within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category

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        05-30-2012, 10:22 PM
      #61
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by loosie    


    That's entirely reasonable IMO & one reason I also learned to shoe(not that I would call myself a farrier & have had precious little experience at it in the last decade). I don't knock those who don't wish to do so though.
    I appreciate your honesty about that - however if I were a potential client of yours, I would not use you - as even though you understand that and tried, your experience is 10 years old now.
    I understand you wouldn't just forget - the old saying you never forget how to ride a bike. I'd probably be a bit wobbly if I tried to ride a bike right now.
    loosie likes this.
         
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        05-30-2012, 10:59 PM
      #62
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AlexS    
    I appreciate your honesty about that - however if I were a potential client of yours, I would not use you
    Yup, agree thoroughly, that if someone were looking for a farrier to do shoes, I wouldn't recommend me either. That's mainly why I don't call myself a farrier & advise people looking for one to find a good one. I would only do it in case of desperate 'first aid' these days and do ensure I have a few respected farriers I can refer people to - I don't just leave them hanging. Been meaning to 'refresh' my skills there, but just haven't got around to it, given it's not a high priority as I've only had to 'outsource' for that reason 3 times now in the last decade.
         
        05-30-2012, 11:22 PM
      #63
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by loosie    
    Yup, agree thoroughly, that if someone were looking for a farrier to do shoes, I wouldn't recommend me either. That's mainly why I don't call myself a farrier & advise people looking for one to find a good one. I would only do it in case of desperate 'first aid' these days and do ensure I have a few respected farriers I can refer people to - I don't just leave them hanging. Been meaning to 'refresh' my skills there, but just haven't got around to it, given it's not a high priority as I've only had to 'outsource' for that reason 3 times now in the last decade.
    oh no no no! :) I was talking theoretically only. Not only are you not in my area - but no offense, the barefoot movement would have to come a long way, a very long way before I'd even consider it again.

    I used a barefoot trimmer with one of my first horses in the US. America is pretty progressive with some things (health care) in comparison to the UK so I tried it. After she finished the trim she said my horse might be lame - yup. I should wait until after the next trim (I am sorry horse) I waited.
    Next trim was done in the pasture (because that's where the horse is most comfortable, and that's what it's all about - her words) I spent my time trying to run off other horses. She also told me that 'oh look, he's licking, he likes what I am doing'.
    Ok - goodbye lady.

    Obviously not all barefooters are insane - in fact a few of my good friends have talked to you and are barefooters themselves now.

    However I will not move to the movement until there is some standards to it. And I will never leave my horse lame again, just because that's what happens from those evil shoes.
         
        05-31-2012, 01:48 AM
      #64
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AlexS    
    Obviously not all barefooters are insane - in fact a few of my good friends have talked to you and are barefooters themselves now.

    However I will not move to the movement until there is some standards to it. And I will never leave my horse lame again, just because that's what happens from those evil shoes.
    Yes, I'm all for at least some basic standards and regulations, tho it seems there are a number of different factions, as in farriery, that couldn't agree on diddly... but the no. 1 'rule' IMO of 'first do no harm' would be a great place to start, to at least knock off those 'your horse will be lame for the first week/month' mob! The post-trim lameness thing doesn't restrict itself to the 'barefoot' side, but it does seem some of those guys take it to an amazing degree - I don't know if they've changed their tune these days, but there was one 'brand' that commonly advised horses would likely be tender for the first year!
         
        05-31-2012, 01:57 AM
      #65
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by loosie    
    to at least knock off those 'your horse will be lame for the first week/month' mob!
    Good to know it's not all like that. She also said she should come out every month, initially, you know just until she fixed the damage of those evil shoes. This was good actually as I 'only' left my horse lame/sore for one month, rather than six weeks. She also charged double to hurt my horse. Great. Thanks for that.

    Thankfully after her comment about licking and trimming in the pasture, I arranged for a farrier was able to come out within 2 days and my horse was shod all around and no longer sore. He laughed at me and told me not to delete her number from my phone in case I ever forgot her name. I took his advise and she is still in my phone, first name is hers - last name is neveruseagain.
         
        05-31-2012, 04:57 AM
      #66
    Foal
    I know there is no one size fits all in farriery - but there is some criteria you have to use, right? How else do you ever know how to trim? If the horse has neat feet and good, straight legs, what I said should be your criteria, I'd think. Besides that, it's something to work to, not something to immediately change every foot you see to, that's a recipe for disaster.

    My horse is toed in in the front feet, and in the sale examination done before we bought him, the vet who did it said not to ever correct the toed in stance, probably because his legs are grown like that, and not just the hoof.

    The thing I wonder is - how exactly do you see the horse has a 'bad' conformation, and it's not a previous bad farrier/trimjob? What exactly do you look at to know whether you need to correct it or not?

    As for the rest of the discussion above, it's really too bad there's so many idiots out there, and I mean in every profession, not just farriery or trimming. Our previous farrier trimmed my horse way uneven and made his wall crack, besides putting shoes on him that didn't fit well, which made him loose them 3 times in the pasture, which basically took his whole hoof apart. To 'cure' it he resected the whole cracked part and just shod it again, without doing something about the unevenness that caused it in the first place.. It put the whole hoof and my horse out of balance (he was tripping quite frequently, until it grew out enough to give him his support back).
         

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