how to ask my farrier to trim a little more aggressively? - Page 2
   

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health > Hoof Care

how to ask my farrier to trim a little more aggressively?

This is a discussion on how to ask my farrier to trim a little more aggressively? within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • How to trim a horses soul
  • Shortening the toe barefoot

Like Tree11Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    08-27-2012, 01:07 PM
  #11
Green Broke
Yes your entire post seems a bit contradictory,
" I love her and she does a great job"

"she's doing it all wrong"

Well which is it ?
jaydee likes this.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    08-27-2012, 07:28 PM
  #12
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaydee    
Is the woman actually qualified as a farrier or is she a a barefoot trimmer who has done a short course - you can even do them online apparently.
Its nice to get on with your farrier but its more important that they are doing a good job and sounds to me like this one isn't
If you're not happy find a replacement.
Its not your job to be telling your farrier what to do - that's why you pay a professional - for their knowledge and expertise
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe4d    
Yes your entire post seems a bit contradictory,
" I love her and she does a great job"

"she's doing it all wrong"

Well which is it ?
You got me, she's a barefoot trimmer. I know all the drama that comes associated with saying you use a barefoot trimmer so I try to avoid saying that to avoid said drama in my post.
She is very knowledgable, and she does do a good job and I never said "she's doing it all wrong" I've just noticed(as well as my barn manager) that it looks like she could take her toes back a little more. I think she is just being overly cautious about not taking them too short. I would like to address that with her without her thinking that I'm being a know-it-all. I don't want to tell her how to do her job.
     
    08-27-2012, 07:53 PM
  #13
Trained
If you aren't confident in your farrier's work - then you need a new farrier.

My farrier is able to explain the mechanics of every trim to me, how he is shoeing, etc.. If anyone ever questions his work on my horse I can explain to them exactly what he is doing and why. If your friends are asking you about a long toe and you don't know the reason for it then ask your farrier and if you don't get an explanation, call someone else.
I do also agree that a lot of horses need a shorter trim cycle than they are allotted. My horses are on a 4-5 week schedule year round. This might be another thing to discuss with your farrier and your new farrier.
beau159 and jaydee like this.
     
    08-27-2012, 08:48 PM
  #14
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by ~*~anebel~*~    
If you aren't confident in your farrier's work - then you need a new farrier.

My farrier is able to explain the mechanics of every trim to me, how he is shoeing, etc.. If anyone ever questions his work on my horse I can explain to them exactly what he is doing and why. If your friends are asking you about a long toe and you don't know the reason for it then ask your farrier and if you don't get an explanation, call someone else.
I do also agree that a lot of horses need a shorter trim cycle than they are allotted. My horses are on a 4-5 week schedule year round. This might be another thing to discuss with your farrier and your new farrier.
I never asked her about it, I'm sure if I did she would give me an answer. When she was out last time I expressed my concern about all the chipping and she explained that chipping was not necessarily a bad thing because it's the hoof self trimming. When she was at my house my old farrier(yes farrier as in he does shoes as well) had her and my other 2 horses on an 8 week schedule and said that wasn't too long for them(I still use him for my other 2 and they are still on an 8 week schedule) when I moved her to a boarding barn it was too far for him to travel for one horse so I used the barn farrier who made my horse lame for 4 months. I went on a search for someone to trim my horse and found the barefoot trimmer I'm currently using. At first she was on a 4 week schedule but we bumped it back to a 6, partly because of cost and partly because at 4 weeks there wasn't much to take off, because of my work schedule I can't do a 5 week(I have off every other Friday and work the rest of the week) I've since moved my horse to yet another barn, this barn uses the same farrier that I use for my other horses so I do have a relationship with an actual farrier should I even have a need for shoes(but I highly doubt it, non of my horses have ever needed shoes, my appy came with all 4 shod and I had his pulled and he goes fine barefoot even on gravel).
     
    08-27-2012, 10:28 PM
  #15
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by MPLdyCop    
Aside from sole support, how is that opposite from what I've done.
You said "There are some factors that inhibit shortening the toe on a barefoot horse. Thin soled, short foot height wise, etc.

An example...... This horse would be sore if the toe was trimmed back to the white line in an effort to "shorten" the toe."

And looking again, I suppose it depends where exactly you mean 'white line'(assuming stretched/lamellar wedge), but I don't find it to be the case, if the horse is backed/bevelled to the edge of the epidermal laminae.
     
    08-27-2012, 10:36 PM
  #16
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by ~*~anebel~*~    
If you aren't confident in your farrier's work - then you need a new farrier.
I think that's a bit harsh, especially as so many owners know little & many care less about the details, so long as their horse is sound, keeping shoes on, etc. But I agree thoroughly with your next comments. I think owner education is so important & I do think that should be one of the responsibilities of a good trimmer/farrier.
     
    08-27-2012, 10:37 PM
  #17
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie    
You said "There are some factors that inhibit shortening the toe on a barefoot horse. Thin soled, short foot height wise, etc.

An example...... This horse would be sore if the toe was trimmed back to the white line in an effort to "shorten" the toe."

And looking again, I suppose it depends where exactly you mean 'white line'(assuming stretched/lamellar wedge), but I don't find it to be the case, if the horse is backed/bevelled to the edge of the epidermal laminae.
White line was solid no distortion. I've found out the hard way (at the owner's request) on horses' like this with a tight white line but stretched out sole/toe that you can't do that. If the horse had more sole depth it'd not be as much of an issue. It's specifically this combination of thin soled and stretched that makes it near impossible to rehab barefoot. Maybe if more were willing to put the horse on a 2 week cycle it might could be acheived. Minor changes each setting to keep the foot gathered.
     
    08-28-2012, 03:05 AM
  #18
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by MPLdyCop    
with a tight white line but stretched out sole/toe
I don't know about a tight white line but stretched 'sole'. What is often the case IME though is that lamellar material is mistaken for sole. Absolutely though, I agree that a foot shouldn't be backed that far if there's a genuinely tight white line(including dermal laminae) though.
     
    08-28-2012, 07:43 AM
  #19
Super Moderator
Hoof work

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachel1786    
You got me, she's a barefoot trimmer. I know all the drama that comes associated with saying you use a barefoot trimmer so I try to avoid saying that to avoid said drama in my post.
She is very knowledgable, and she does do a good job and I never said "she's doing it all wrong" I've just noticed(as well as my barn manager) that it looks like she could take her toes back a little more. I think she is just being overly cautious about not taking them too short. I would like to address that with her without her thinking that I'm being a know-it-all. I don't want to tell her how to do her job.
I do understand what you mean here but there's a good reason people are sceptical about 'barefoot trimmers' - its because a lot of them are poorly trained - if even trained at all. I have no problem with a horse being barefoot if its sound and able to cope with all the work it has to do but having a good shaped hoof is just as important as if it was being shod. My farrier is properly qualified, he will put shoes on or barefoot trim. He discusses everything with me so I understand why he's doing anything different. I think its a real shame that the people who are going around claiming to be trimmers are giving the ones who are qualified to do the job a bad name. I was not referring to your lady here - she may have a good reason to be doing what she;s doing. My concern with long toes is that not only could they be putting a strain on the hoof itself they could also be affecting the angle of stance and putting a strain on her tendons and joints
Maybe you could post some photos?
     
    08-28-2012, 09:17 AM
  #20
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie    
I don't know about a tight white line but stretched 'sole'. What is often the case IME though is that lamellar material is mistaken for sole. Absolutely though, I agree that a foot shouldn't be backed that far if there's a genuinely tight white line(including dermal laminae) though.
LOL, I am not mistaking the laminar material for sole. The hoof is literally stretched out from the point of the frog, sole and all. In the ones I've found like this it took shoes to actually get the foot gathered back up. And it would become better balanced and gathered up.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What is the difference between a barefoot trim & a farrier trim? flytobecat Horse Health 20 10-12-2013 05:04 PM
Natural barefoot trim vs. Reg bareft trim?? free_sprtd Horse Health 9 12-28-2012 05:35 PM
BO authorized different farrier to trim horse who had been trimmed 3 weeks ago..... Kymbadina Horse Health 9 10-03-2011 10:10 PM
Hoof care, self trim V no trim Golden Horse Hoof Care 39 07-20-2011 07:23 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:59 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0