How do I fit Easy boot, or similar boots?
 
 

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How do I fit Easy boot, or similar boots?

This is a discussion on How do I fit Easy boot, or similar boots? within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
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    12-22-2012, 02:48 PM
  #1
Green Broke
How do I fit Easy boot, or similar boots?

Hi guys, as some of you know Cinny lacerated his foot last summer through the coronet band. Serious Heel, foot, coronet injury :( VERY GRAPHIC BLOODY ! UPDATE: 07/09/12 !!! It healed up pretty well, however now that he has had time to regrow hoof, it has been determined that it is weak in the area where he cut the coronet band.

My farrier and vet both don't want to put shoes on him (he has never worn shoes in his life) because they are afraid it will make it worse. It was suggested I use Easy Boots ore similar for any riding outside of the soft arena.

Does anyone have experience with these, as well as fitting them. Is there a brand, style etc I should avoid? I have no clue what size to get or how to determine what size to get. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

He is a 15 h APHA. When his hooves grow they do not grow longways, they more or less grow flared (another reason they don't' want to shoe him, it would put more pressure on his hooves as they grew out).

Thank you for ANY and all suggestions. If you have other ideas besides easy boots, please let me know. He is perfectly sound and I want to keep him that way.
     
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    12-22-2012, 02:56 PM
  #2
Trained
The easy boot website has instructions and I believe a lot you can purchase for fitting. All the manufacturers should have a fitting guideline on their site.
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    12-22-2012, 07:17 PM
  #3
Trained
If you go with anything in their glove line, they have a very useful fit kit to make sure you end up ordering the correct shell.
     
    12-22-2012, 08:10 PM
  #4
Yearling
I recommend having someone experienced fit your horse. And then you need to keep a close watch on the fit, as their feet can change sizes between trimmings and at different times of the year. For instance, my boy's back feet are .5 in the back on both feet, but fluctuate between 1.5 and 2 on the front, sometimes with each foot being different. You can also wrap the foot in athletic tape if they're feeling a tad loose.

NEVER sell your Easyboots if your horse outgrows them! You will most likely end up buying the same size again down the road. I have 8 boots for one horse at the moment - it depends on the time of year when he needs to use one size or the other.

There is an Easyboot exchange for when people trade one size for another. Not sure where it is, but it shouldn't be too hard to find. Try the Easyboot site or endurance.net - I'm an endurance rider and they're very popular in our world as well as the Renegades. Those are the main two brands, and in my area, other types of boots are almost nonexistent.

I love my easyboot gloves. They take a little getting used to, but I'll swear by them. Get yourself a cheap rubber mallet for putting them on and a screw driver for prying them off.

Feel free to ask me anything about my boots - I started using them this year when I started endurance, so I still remember what it's like to be new to them, but I've also put a LOT of miles on them and love them!
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    12-22-2012, 10:16 PM
  #5
Trained
Look at the charts, measure twice - buy once. :) As poster ^ said, you can get a fit kit for glove line, it is worth every penny! Pay close attention to his foot "shape" when you "shop". Some boots are aimed more at round feet, others at oval.

I am guessing that you meant the hoof wall is weak (scarred) from that point down? IMO, I would not put a metal shoe on it ever. The last thing it needs (if, in fact, it is compromised) is a non-yeilding surface. But, boots - yes, I would definitely use them.
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    12-24-2012, 01:19 AM
  #6
Trained
Hi, I wouldn't personally recommend Cavellos - cheap option, but cheap product IMO. I wouldn't recommend Boas unless your horse has really upright hoof/pastern confo & boxy feet. I wouldn't recommend Gloves unless your horse has A1 hoof confo & you'll be maintaining them frequently between farrier visits - great boot, but with no fastening system, they have to fit perfectly, no flares, etc. Also no room for padding or such.

There are pros & cons to all the other Easyboot range & to Renegades, of which there is info on the Easycare site at least, about different considerations when choosing boots. Depends on your situation, how much you do with your horse, etc. No. One consideration is finding ones that fit well.
     
    12-24-2012, 12:39 PM
  #7
Green Broke
Thank you everyone. I have been doing a LOT of research but still feel a bit confused as to what is the right choice for Cinny. We don't do a LOT of trail, definitely not endurance rides. More or less riding through the local nature parks on dirt trails that CAN have some rocks here and there but for the most part is dirt and mud. I do like to go out and work on lateral movements in big grassy fields or sometimes go through test movements out where it's harder for him to pay attention to me as I think it's great show ring practice. Last year he got little chips and superficial cracks on occasion (before his injury) and he was fine with good maintenance. I am just worried about him stepping on a stone in just the right place on that front foot as I have been warned that it could be sensitive and or be an easy candidate for a quarter crack. You know horses, if they have a weak spot, that is exactly where they are going to step on something like a rock ha ha.

I may start out trying the Glove. A lot of my friends who ride long trails, and competitive trail here in Nebraska and Iowa really like them. One of the local clinicians who does a LOT of competitive trail told me that I should probably start out with just fronts but buy 2 pair for him. Measure when he is freshly trimmed for the first pair, and then measure him after 4-5 weeks for the second pair. This actually sounds like good advice since Cinny grows outward not downward and I would have never thought of it. She also said that with "Gloves" I want to make a lightweight fleece type wrap to go under the glove around the pasterns to prevent rubs.
     
    12-24-2012, 12:54 PM
  #8
Foal
Cinny its all a learning process .... this is one of those things you have to dive into and learn along the way.... I went though quite a few styles of boot , to see what worked best for my horse and what we do. It cost me some $$ , but it was a good learning experience, so enjoy the "ride"
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    12-26-2012, 02:14 PM
  #9
Green Broke
Hi Cinny, I've got a pair of Easy Boot Epics with about 500 miles of trail riding on them and a pair of Renegades with around 200 trail miles on them, almost all in the mountains of E. TN and N. Georgia. While not nearly as tough of terrain as out west, but it's rugged country never the less.

Both are great boots and each has it's pro's and con's.

Personally, for me, I give a slight edge to the Renegade because they're easier to put on and they clean up a little easier.

Because the Easy Boot has a gaiter it might work better for you if you were trail riding more as the gaiter covers the pastern a little higher than the Renegade . When I first started riding with the Epics I'd wrap the pasterns with vet wrap and then put the boots on and doing this would give you more protection.

Easy boot has some good video's on their website, both wrapping the pasterns with vet wrap as well as how to fit/size, and how to put them on.

Renegade has about the same info on there web site.
     
    12-26-2012, 03:28 PM
  #10
Yearling
I recommend just getting the fronts, too, to see how you like them. However, I wouldn't buy two pairs - I'd save the money and invest in a good rasp. I have a Belotta. It doesn't take a lot to learn how to rasp the toes down so your boots fit even 4-5 weeks after a trim. I generally rasp once a week when I'm using my Gloves, and then they get trimmed every 4-5 weeks. It sounds like a lot, but I've found I'm much more in tune with my horse's feet and needs. I could go longer without trimming, but I like to make sure my boy is balanced and we've been doing some corrective trimming. The rasp will run you about $30-50, but that's a lot cheaper than a second set of boots, especially when you have them on all four feet and then your horse's feet change sizes depending on the season! (and I'm not just talking about my horse - most horses will need new boots throughout the years)

You named one of the main reasons I prefer boots over shoes, btw - their whole hoof is protected. You can still get stone bruised with a shoe if they step just right!
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