How do you tell good farrier work from bad? - Page 2
   

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How do you tell good farrier work from bad?

This is a discussion on How do you tell good farrier work from bad? within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Should farrier be responsible for bad job?
  • Bad farrier medial lateral imbalance

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    05-09-2012, 11:57 PM
  #11
Yearling
In picture 4 is the left hind flared? If so, does this horses leg twist outward slightly? I ask because my Rascal twists with the left hind and it is constantly flared. More questions to come, I am sure LOL

Gabino from the farriers forum? I used to haunt that site. I need to look it back up wince all the changes were made.
     
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    05-10-2012, 12:22 AM
  #12
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rascaholic    
In picture 4 is the left hind flared? If so, does this horses leg twist outward slightly?
Don't remember any significant flaring. This is a fairly high dollar hunter and offers generally good comformation. No limb twist.

Quote:
I ask because my Rascal twists with the left hind and it is constantly flared. More questions to come, I am sure LOL
Check medial/lateral balance of the hoof. Is the flare on the lateral side?

Quote:
Gabino from the farriers forum?
Yep. He gets some interesting cases.

Quote:
I used to haunt that site. I need to look it back up wince all the changes were made.
It's a good site but has suffered some technical difficulties of late. Seems to be getting better.

Cheers,
Mark
     
    05-10-2012, 01:29 AM
  #13
Yearling
Horseman 56, funny you should mention technical difficulties. I went to look it up after my bookmark didn't work and I got the clear DNS message. I did, and I still get the message.

I will get some pictures of his hooves tomorrow. We have come a long LONG way on correcting the issues, but we still have a long way to go. I have considered shoes since hopefully I can start riding him after his eval in July. *crosses fingers* The pelvic injury seems to have healed. That is what initially caused the twist in the right hind. It's now as healed as it will ever be, and only time will tell if he will stay sound when I put him under saddle. I am working on conditioning SLOWLY so we have the best chance possible.

I attached a quick representation of his injuries. Sorry it was the best I could do right now. I am at work and personal computer is down.

ETA: The suspected injury couldn't be confirmed by xray or ultrasound. We knew the injury was 4 to 6 weeks old when he was seen by my vet. There was so much swelling internally we were lucky to get as far as we did with diagnosis.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Horse Anatomy.jpg (19.9 KB, 151 views)
     
    05-10-2012, 06:57 AM
  #14
Banned
Mark,

Would you like to change the title of this thread to something more descriptive of the content?

Even though it's in the hood care section, the title "Hunters" might lead people to believe it's about that discipline, not a detailed description of shoeing technique and what constitutes mediocre, good or excellent farriery.

I'm thinking the misleading title is why it hasn't gotten the traffic it deserves.
Rascaholic likes this.
     
    05-10-2012, 07:52 AM
  #15
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by maura    
Mark,

Would you like to change the title of this thread to something more descriptive of the content?
If you think that would add value, I'm not opposed to the idea.

Quote:
Even though it's in the hood care section, the title "Hunters" might lead people to believe it's about that discipline, not a detailed description of shoeing technique and what constitutes mediocre, good or excellent farriery.
The "hood care section"?

Horses in the Hood! I like that!

Quote:
I'm thinking the misleading title is why it hasn't gotten the traffic it deserves.
I don't know how much traffic it deserves so will defer to your judgement.

Cheers,
Mark
     
    05-10-2012, 09:03 AM
  #16
Banned
Watch out for karma! Make fun of my typos and you're sure to then make a howler of your own!
     
    05-10-2012, 09:34 AM
  #17
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Horseman56    
Does your farrier consider environment and performance expectations when shoeing your horse? Does he talk to you about these things or does he just nail a set on without discussing how the horse will be used or the environment of that use.
When our old English farrier (God rest his soul) convinced/taught me how to trim our barefoot mares, he always emphasized this idea. His expression was "you need to trim the horse, not the hoof."
     
    05-10-2012, 12:50 PM
  #18
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by Horseman56    
It is the contention of many farriers that horse owners, in broad generalities, do not know enough about what a horses bare/shod foot should look like to determine good from bad.

In my view, that's OUR (farriers) fault. We need to do more to raise owner awareness AND raise the bar on farriery quality within the trade.
I do think it's an owner responsibility as well to get some education on good vs bad (with books, videos, or even class). And discuss with farrier the wishes or concerns. I'm not saying the owner should be an expert, but quite often it's easy to tell if the trim simply doesn't look right.
Rascaholic and crimsonsky like this.
     
    05-11-2012, 01:59 AM
  #19
Started
Quote:
I do think it's an owner responsibility as well to get some education on good vs bad (with books, videos, or even class). And discuss with farrier the wishes or concerns. I'm not saying the owner should be an expert, but quite often it's easy to tell if the trim simply doesn't look right.


To an extent, I agree. However, I think there are a lot of horse owners that do not realize how important the more subtle details of a shoeing are. Of course, anyone should be able to tell something is wrong if their horse immediately comes up lame or their horse gets a whack job. I think it is much harder to tell when everything looks pretty and as it should (from the untrained eye).

I have certainly had the very bad ones where it becomes clear immediately. I have also had the farrier that I thought was doing a really good job until a lameness specialist said otherwise.

Mark, thank you for taking the time to help educate us! Your post is very helpful.
     
    05-11-2012, 02:40 AM
  #20
Foal
Wow glad I read up on this........ thanks so much for the info now I can know more what to look for and more questions I need to ask my farrier while he is out!! Two thumbs up!!
     

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