How long to keep going with barefoot trimming? - Page 3
 
 

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How long to keep going with barefoot trimming?

This is a discussion on How long to keep going with barefoot trimming? within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Joe kunkel the barefoot trimmer

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    01-05-2013, 01:56 PM
  #21
Yearling
Yup. A transmission shop only does transmissions...Still a mechanic. Specialization is the future folks. I only do non metal hoof work. If someone wants or needs metal shoes or I think someone else can serve them better, I refer if at all possible. Im not going to tell someone they need transmission work when what they really need is a fuel pump. Its just professional ethics. Some people have them and some don't no matter what business they are in. Your reputation goes with you ;)


Ditto TCs 30% Finally talked a friend of mine into putting her two on it after battling a weak white line and we are FINALLY seeing improvement after way too long of battling this issue. Diet is 90% of the battle in feet.
     
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    01-05-2013, 02:14 PM
  #22
Trained
I've used about 6 Farriers over the years, and now that I am using a trimmer, by horses feet have never looked better.

Why would I go back to a Farrier when they don't do the job as well? I would much rather a specialist who does a better job. I am, after all, all about the best thing for my horses. If my trimmer didn't provide it (And he is happy to tell me if he thinks any might need shoes) then I would go to someone else.
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    01-05-2013, 03:18 PM
  #23
Trained
Interesting. I have never heard of Gro n win. I will have to look for it.

I personally think the poison is in the dose. I weigh everything. I actually like Purina strategy in the winter, and nutrena smart choice original for the rest of the year. I feed a single pound of it to each per day, broken into two feedings. I also don't believe a small amount of oats is bad in the winter - it is the only "grain" type I feed, it has a fantastic shelf life, and it actually offers some good nutritional value in low doses - I will, on occasion, feed 8oz of oats per horse. I feed beet pulp only for the purpose of sand collic prevention. I also feed alfalfa hay only, mainly b/c timothy has gotten out of sight price wise. I like flax oil but its shelf life isn't that great, so I ordinarily reach for corn oil. I won't say that is it...b/c I like to "mix it up" for them w veggies and fruits as treats. Anyway, my horses' feet have always done extremely well on a "mostly hay" diet w small doses of other feeds.

I would like to be able to get flax seed, but it is not easy to get here...so I will just rob lockwood of hers. :)
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    01-05-2013, 03:44 PM
  #24
Super Moderator
*runs out to defend her seeds*

You know, you could consider having a bag shipped to you. One 50lb bag last me a whole year, and I also feed it to my other critters.
Grow N Win is made by Buckeye Nutrition and comes in a grass and alfalfa formula. I'm not sure they have it that far west, but if they do it's pretty good stuff. Very fair priced for a RB too.

ETA: http://www.gro-n-win.com/
     
    01-05-2013, 04:40 PM
  #25
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lockwood    
*runs out to defend her seeds*

You know, you could consider having a bag shipped to you. One 50lb bag last me a whole year, and I also feed it to my other critters.
Grow N Win is made by Buckeye Nutrition and comes in a grass and alfalfa formula. I'm not sure they have it that far west, but if they do it's pretty good stuff. Very fair priced for a RB too.

ETA: Gro 'n Win
*hiding behind bushes, figuring lockwood has to sleep sometime"

I actually called all the feed stores in town and asked if they carried flax seed, one said "yes"... but forgot they to tell me they only get in a few bags (a month I think it was), so...I tullied all the way there a few weeks later, and they didn't have it. That did it for me!

Aha, looked at gro n win. I use laken lite, kind of similar .. alfalfa pellets fortified w vitamins and minerals. The estrella has more protein which I don't need (I feed alfalfa hay already).
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    01-05-2013, 04:55 PM
  #26
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Missy May    
We live in a specialized society. Someone that specializes in barefoot trimming has little reason to practice shoeing. It is the owners choice to choose a "specialist" or a "general practitioner". My old farrier and friend has a degree in equine podiatry and specialized in barefoot trimming - I would hardly call her "ill equiped" or "unknowledgeable".
Dont care how many degrees they have, if they show up to do a horse with out even the basic tools and supplies of the job to deal with any reasonable issues then they are ill equipped. I think the English Language agrees with me.
ill-equipped
adjective poorly supplied with physical equipment

Riddle me this, is "Farrier" a legal term in some states so the whole, I'm not a farrier, I'm a barefoot trimmer is dodging somekinda law ?
We seem to have alot of vodoo pixie dust salesmen going around that try to present barefoot trimming as somekinda druid magic , when it is just a basic task that any competant farrier can manage. Any farrier, trimmer podiatrist or what not that begins any hoof care statement with all horses or no horses isnt going to get my business. Id rather deal withsomeone that stays up on the techniques and is good at looking at the horse and taking apropriate action with lots of different techniques and tools at thier disposal. Based on the horse and expected uses.
     
    01-05-2013, 05:09 PM
  #27
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe4d    
Dont care how many degrees they have, if they show up to do a horse with out even the basic tools and supplies of the job to deal with any reasonable issues then they are ill equipped. I think the English Language agrees with me.
ill-equipped
adjective poorly supplied with physical equipment

Riddle me this, is "Farrier" a legal term in some states so the whole, I'm not a farrier, I'm a barefoot trimmer is dodging somekinda law ?
we seem to have alot of vodoo pixie dust salesmen going around that try to present barefoot trimming as somekinda druid magic , when it is just a basic task that any competant farrier can manage. Any farrier, trimmer podiatrist or what not that begins any hoof care statement with all horses or no horses isnt going to get my business. Id rather deal withsomeone that stays up on the techniques and is good at looking at the horse and taking apropriate action with lots of different techniques and tools at thier disposal. Based on the horse and expected uses.

In the Uk it is illegal for anyone to shoe a horse except a farrier (including glue ons), but that does not mean that all farrier's are the best for your horse as the training course actually has very little to do with diet and trimming a barefoot horse for performance, but an awful lot about making and fixing shoes to a horse. I have had at least 6 different farriers over the years and not one would I say actually knew what a barefoot horse was capable of if given the correct diet and environment and movement.
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    01-05-2013, 06:35 PM
  #28
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe4d    
Dont care how many degrees they have, if they show up to do a horse with out even the basic tools and supplies of the job to deal with any reasonable issues then they are ill equipped. I think the English Language agrees with me.
ill-equipped
adjective poorly supplied with physical equipment

Riddle me this, is "Farrier" a legal term in some states so the whole, I'm not a farrier, I'm a barefoot trimmer is dodging somekinda law ?
We seem to have alot of vodoo pixie dust salesmen going around that try to present barefoot trimming as somekinda druid magic , when it is just a basic task that any competant farrier can manage. Any farrier, trimmer podiatrist or what not that begins any hoof care statement with all horses or no horses isnt going to get my business. Id rather deal withsomeone that stays up on the techniques and is good at looking at the horse and taking apropriate action with lots of different techniques and tools at thier disposal. Based on the horse and expected uses.
You have a "family doctor" for general ailments. You are referred to a "specialist" if they can't take care of a specific problem you have. Are you going to tell me they are NOT all doctors? Are you going to tell me the "specialist" in brain surgery is a quack because he doesn't do "general practice"?

You just can't put labels on things like yesteryear, we are now in a society where people "specialize". If you want shoes, call a farrier, but if you want a natural trim, you need to call a "trimmer" because most "farrier's" will insist on slapping steel on every horse because "that's what they have done all their lives".

I used to use a great farrier, 12 years later I returned to the area to find that he's still shoeing at my barn. But he won't do a "barefoot trim", he just pulls shoes and leaves them flat and flared. He insists on paring the sole like he's putting on steel...even if asked for a "barefoot trim". Sorry to say, I no longer use him because he refuses to do what I ask...what I have learned from allowing my mind to expand with knowledge.

So I had to learn to do my own because no one here "specializes" in what I want and need for my horse. There IS a place for both, just like there is a place for all sorts of specializations of medical professionals.

Some people are just to opinionated to accept the fact that times have changed.
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    01-05-2013, 06:36 PM
  #29
Weanling
Missy May:
Feeding a pound of strategy is pretty pointless. What exactly do you think your horses are getting from it? At 1lb, it is being VERY underfed and your horse is not receiving close to the nutrition he should be. The feeding directions are on the bag for a reason. When the bag lists a minimum feeding amount, that is the about that is needed to fulfill the nutrition requirements. You would be better off to feed 1lb of a RB. It would supply your horses with adequate nutrition.

If you are feeding the 1lb of strategy for extra calories, then the are much healthier options to feed to do that such as alfalfa pellets, rice bran pellets (or oil), cocos soya oil, beet pulp, etc.

I stay away from purina as a whole, but I def wouldn't feed a feed that high in NSC, especially since it has a very limited effect and very minimal benefit to your horse.

Oats I have used for extra calories,, but my mare is very sensitive to them. Even at 1lb, they turn her into a complete monster. As I said before, there are much healthier options for added calories.
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    01-05-2013, 06:47 PM
  #30
Weanling
Joe:
It's too bad that you are so closed minded and set in your ways.

I have a very good friend who is a trimmer only. She does not shoe. She can balance a foot like you wouldn't believe. She has brought back quite a few horses with sever laminitis an hoof issues with her work and knowledge of equine nutrition. Unfortunately, there are very few farriers or trimmers that can correctly trim a horse and balance a foot. As easy as it may seem, it's very hard to find a good one. It took me years of trial an error and reading and conversing with my friend to finally find a good farrier. I trimmed my own horses for almost a year bc no one locally could seem to keep my horses sound nor could they perform a balanced trim. It was very frustrating. I'm thankful for my farrier I have now. I have one horse that's sound barefoot at all times. The other, even though she is on a quality diet and I have seen major hoof improvement just can't work with out fronts. Her genetics just won't allow it, tho I am still trying some alternatives to get her there.

It depends on the animal, their genetics and their diet. No one in their right mind would call a trimmer of they wanted a set of shoes. I'm lucky to have a farrier who can do it all, but I would call a good trimmer in a heart beat if I had to. Whatever is necessary to keep my horses sound.

Discounting a trimmers work just bc they don't shoe is completely ridiculous IMO. After all.... The trim is the most important part. If the trim isn't balanced, then slapping shoes on the feet isn't productive nor is it beneficial and you're still going to end up with issues.
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