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I decided to get my horse shoed...

This is a discussion on I decided to get my horse shoed... within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category

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        08-12-2013, 11:44 PM
      #11
    Banned
    If the horse needs shoes then get it shod. We ride 6 days a week our horses can't go barefoot the trails we ride are rocky. We trash a set of shoes in 4 weeks our horses would be sore and lame without shoe so shoes it is.

    Farrier isn't the best but oh well we ride a lot and our horses can't be barefoot not much choice. Right now they are barefoot only because my horse has issues so can't be riden so iam doing them myself for now. But once my horse is ridable farrier will be out to put on shoes. So I pay for less then great work but our horses aren't sore footed because their barefoot....riding on rocky trails.
         
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        08-12-2013, 11:55 PM
      #12
    Trained
    I haven't a clue why people think shoes are evil or something. Leaving a horse barefoot and letting it gimp around until it toughens up it's sole in cruel IMO. I ride my horses so much, I would have no hoof left if I didn't have shoes on them in spring until the snow flies. They are barefoot in winter when there is snow on the ground. I really don't understand the aversion to shoes?
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        08-13-2013, 12:07 AM
      #13
    Foal
    88. Unfortunately this is the case for a lot of folks. A good farrier is hard to find and if you do find one take care to keep him/her. Just don't settle for one your not happy with there are good farriers out there you just have to weed out the unreliable and the unskilled. I totally agree that if your horse can go barefoot with no issues wonderful! I really like my guy and would recommend him to anyone.
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        08-13-2013, 11:00 AM
      #14
    Yearling
    The aversion to shoes stems from some piss poor farrier work out there. You guys see all the disgraceful work and resulting feet that get posted here. IDK how some of the farriers keep business except that people simply don't know any better. The reason and fault is all the farriers own quite simply. They need to update their education as a whole group, pressure the "bad" farriers to get up to date and better themselves and have one main place that certifies them - NOT based on how well they can forge iron but based on how well they can trim a bad foot and "see" what is going on on the inside even without X rays. Hoof mapping is SO important. I love that someone has come u[p with a reasonable way to see what to do and where the toe should be. Long toes and the resulting problems stemming from it are the number 1 problem in domestic horse feet IMO today. JMO

    Good shoeing is good shoeing. No problem with that at all except perhaps to see a young horse isn shoes constantly. A personal pet peeve. But there is an epidemic of horrid bad atrocious shoe jobs out there. Barefoot is at least forgiving of trimming errors unlike a shod foot and there are hoof boots to protect an unshod foot when needed. I think most people realize that leaving a horse gimpy in his pasture for weeks or riding a gimpy horse is not a good idea.
         
        08-13-2013, 11:09 AM
      #15
    Green Broke
    For as many bad shoe jobs there are out there I see equally bad trims. Two years ago a "natural barefoot trimmer" trimmed my friends horse so short the very put her on stall rest for a month, was slightly laminitic and it was 4 months before another farrier would touch her feet. Then there's the other trimmer who has convinced my friend its out to let her horse gimp all the time over rocks because "he needs to toughen up his feet and reach his goal"... Sorry, it been 2 years. The "goal" should have been met by now!

    If poor farriers are a reason not to put shoes on your horse you obviously aren't doing your homework. Finding a good farrier takes lots of digging, watching and networking but its all worth it in the end!
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        08-13-2013, 12:41 PM
      #16
    Yearling
    I didnt say all "trimmers" were good either but I still personally seee many many more bad trims coming from farriers. If they can't trim to shoe they can't trim just to trim either. Its just that trims are more forgiving as a rule than a foot locked into a shoe. I personally know many many many more horses with terrible shoe jobs and lameness due to them and bad TRIMS from farriers professing to be well versed in natural type trimming who are not up to date. I rarely see actual poor "natural" trims from a trimmer only, but yes, I have seen a few around here.

    I have done my homework for my area ;) and I trim and shoe my own now because of it.
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        08-13-2013, 02:26 PM
      #17
    Green Broke
    I think everything depends on quality. Apples to apples, having a good shoe job or keeping a good barefoot trim is a personal choice. Currently, all of my riding partners have their horses shod. My mare is not and never has been - but she does wear boots on the trail. And, like I have said before...their shod feet look fine to me, and so do my mare's.
         
        08-13-2013, 02:51 PM
      #18
    Trained
    I finally found a farrier who knows what he's doing and my mare feels a million times better because of it.

    Shoeing is something that is necessary for me because my horses work extremely hard. They get everything they can to make their work more comfortable. My mare has a special set of 3/4 sliders on as well that help her keep her back end freed up.

    It's not an evil practice when done right. Anything done wrong can screw a horse's feet up.
         
        08-13-2013, 02:57 PM
      #19
    Green Broke
    I wish I could recommend trimming yourself. I even got a book on it, and was moderately successful when my older horses were between farriers about 10 years ago. It looked like a comedy with my as the hoof holder and my eldest daughter trimming---"How many clowns does it take to trim a hoof!!?"
    IF you trim yourself you must purchase a really GOOD trimmer. The cheap ones are lousy. I think the good ones run ~$150.00/each. (I could trust THESE horses not to kick us in the face--they had been there, done that.)
    If you want to learn to file the hooves you'd be more successful at that and those aren't nearly as pricey.
    Shoes are a good alternative to some hoof problems. I would follow your farrier's suggestions and, even it you like him shod, give him at least 3 months during the winter to go barefoot.
         
        08-13-2013, 05:04 PM
      #20
    Foal
    Corporal. What type of trimmer is 150$
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