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I just don't know what to do any more.

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    10-26-2013, 11:55 AM
  #31
Yearling
Thanks for the support. Farrier was just here and he said to poultice the foot. We already soaked it in warm water with epsom salts, and now he's got a little poulticed footy! He is under going a course of antibiotics, and the swelling in his leg is already receding. Poor fellow will be on box rest for a few days, 4 at least.

I did have awful trouble with candy when I bought her, as a 3 year old. I had her about 3 weeks, when she pulled a muscle and was off for nearly a year. She was at a vital stage in her training, as she was just broken. She's never quite caught up with other ponies her age, due to that, and she developed the smallest of string halts.
I'm just terrified that the same thing will happen to Diddly. He's showing huge potential for eventing, and I'm being so careful with him... He's like a Faberge egg!
Again thanks for the support and I'll keep you all updated :)
     
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    10-26-2013, 05:36 PM
  #32
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthernMama    
Barring proper care of course,
I mean barring Improper care... err, oh, you know what I mean I think.
     
    10-26-2013, 05:50 PM
  #33
Weanling
Hoping he's feeling better soon!
     
    10-26-2013, 07:34 PM
  #34
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by CandyCanes    
No stone bruise. So it didn't originate in the foot. Diddly's tendon is now very swollen and there's a pulse, and he has a crack at the top of his foot where the hoof meets the coronary band. Either our other horse trod on his foot, or he got a thorn or something in it.
We are trying to get hold of the vet, but we can't seem to. :(
There are more things that can happen to hooves than stone bruises. Sounds like an abscess that burst on the coronary. This can happen if they bash their coronary band, but it commonly happens because of general ill health in the hoof, for whatever reason - often imbalance, laminitis, bad 'seedy toe', etc. Best treatment for this is well trimmed hooves that aren't peripherally loaded, and lots of free movement. In conjunction with poulticing &/or mild antiseptic treatment to prevent further infection of the compromised wall.

Quote:
I would just like to know why some people say don't get it opened just so I can be educated to other views.
Very good. At any rate, if your horse already has a 'split' it's been & gone now. *Generally* I wouldn't advise 'digging out' an abscess. It leaves the hoof open to further infection, antiseptic on live tissue can further damage & inhibit healing, and especially if in the sole, removes the 'armour plating' of the hoof capsule to protect the live foot inside. It is also common for vets to 'dig' in the wrong place, to 'follow tracts' that aren't there, etc. All in all, IME it's generally better to leave the area intact, barring a good trim, poultice the foot and encourage(but not force) movement, which will bring it more quickly to a head. I also wouldn't use bute as a rule, as suppressing the inflammation can just suppress the abscess without it resolving, making it take longer & possibly cause other issues. There are other non-anti-inflammatory pain relievers that can be used if necessary.

Quote:
I bought her, as a 3 year old. I had her about 3 weeks, when she pulled a muscle and was off for nearly a year. She was at a vital stage in her training, as she was just broken. She's never quite caught up with other ponies her age, due to that, and she developed the smallest of string halts.
Good that she got a year off. Much better not to ride a 3yo baby. Must have been a major 'muscle pull' to be off for a year though - sounds like she was indeed broken! I know about Australian Stringhalt, but it's very different to what others call it. I'm interested in how did the stringhalt relate to her issues? I thought it was a neurological problem.
     
    10-26-2013, 07:41 PM
  #35
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by CandyCanes    
No stone bruise. So it didn't originate in the foot. Diddly's tendon is now very swollen and there's a pulse, and he has a crack at the top of his foot where the hoof meets the coronary band. Either our other horse trod on his foot, or he got a thorn or something in it.
We are trying to get hold of the vet, but we can't seem to. :(
There are more things that can happen to hooves than stone bruises. Sounds like an abscess that burst on the coronary. This can happen if they bash their coronary band, but it commonly happens because of general ill health in the hoof, for whatever reason - often imbalance, laminitis, bad 'seedy toe', etc. Best treatment for this is well trimmed hooves that aren't peripherally loaded, and lots of free movement. In conjunction with poulticing &/or mild antiseptic treatment to prevent further infection of the compromised wall.

Quote:
I would just like to know why some people say don't get it opened just so I can be educated to other views.
Very good. At any rate, if your horse already has a 'split' it's been & gone now. *Generally* I wouldn't advise 'digging out' an abscess. It leaves the hoof open to further infection, antiseptic on live tissue can further damage & inhibit healing, and especially if in the sole, removes the 'armour plating' of the hoof capsule to protect the live foot inside. It is also common for vets to 'dig' in the wrong place, to 'follow tracts' that aren't there, etc. All in all, IME it's generally better to leave the area intact, barring a good trim, poultice the foot and encourage(but not force) movement, which will bring it more quickly to a head. I also wouldn't use bute as a rule, as suppressing the inflammation can just suppress the abscess without it resolving, making it take longer & possibly cause other issues. There are other non-anti-inflammatory pain relievers that can be used if necessary.

Quote:
I bought her, as a 3 year old. I had her about 3 weeks, when she pulled a muscle and was off for nearly a year. She was at a vital stage in her training, as she was just broken. She's never quite caught up with other ponies her age, due to that, and she developed the smallest of string halts.
Good that she got a year off. Much better not to ride a 3yo baby. Must have been a major 'muscle pull' to be off for a year though - sounds like she was indeed broken! I know about Australian Stringhalt, but it's very different to what others call it. I'm interested in how did the stringhalt relate to her issues? I thought it was a neurological problem.
     
    10-27-2013, 05:33 AM
  #36
Yearling
Thanks all :)
He's a grumpy fellow, on box rest. Hates being in :P
Anyway, the abscess has not been dug out, but is being drawn out by the poultice. Both the vet and the farrier agree that it was either Percy walking on him (most likely as revenge, because diddly kicked him in the knee!) or he got a thorn in his coronary band, as he's always rooting around in the hedge. Curious bugger.
I'll admit, Loosie, that in Ireland we tend to break them extremely early. Many, myself included (guilty), actually find it very late to break a horse at 4-5 years old. I am desperately trying to get myself out of the habit of raising an eyebrow when someone says they are breaking in their 4 year old. (Oh, the shame!)
This problem we have tends to stem from the future event horse leagues, and other shows of that nature. People are so pressurized to have their eventer's jumping a meter ten or more by four years old. Because there is the four and five year old league; Meter ten and meter twenty.
Diddly should count his lucky stars because, any where else, with someone who realized his potential, he would be out of the circuit right now, jumping, jumping, jumping. As it is, I'm not even going over a single fence until he's five or five and a half. I'm getting him foot perfect in his flat work and dressage before hand. I've had first hand experience with this future event horse league lark.... A relative of mine bred a thoroughbred x Connemara. This mare is a machine, but she's only a baby. Four and a half, and she's already doing a meter thirty. And do you know what? She's stone mad. Absolutely nuts in the head. I wonder why. That's what's sad about it... These brilliant horse with so much potential either break down, or go nut's. :(
Miniature rant thing over.
Chickenoverlord and Roux like this.
     
    10-30-2013, 11:56 AM
  #37
Yearling
*update for mr.squat!*

Yay! Diddly is completely sound... Way before I expected. I rode him out this morning as he was going to explode if I left him in his stable another day. So any way his little footie was poulticed for 3 days and all the gunk went away. All the hear and swelling went as well, and he's also off the antibiotics :) As a double bonus Percy's knee has healed as well where Diddly kicked him! No more killing each other boys! I squirted iodine on the coronary band, and he was good to go. Amazingly he was a lazy bugger out on our road hack today. Huh... Typical. Then I let him out in the field and he tore round at an amazing speed. Nutter.

Anyway hopefully my spell of bad luck has blown over and I get the longest spell of good luck anybodies ever known! *Crossed fingers*
NorthernMama, loosie and Lexiie like this.
     
    11-04-2013, 07:35 AM
  #38
Foal
I saw on here someone said to not let a farrier dig out an abcess, while I agree with it somewhat, keep and open mind about letting a vet if you would. My big horse, always has had feet problems but its been due to bad trimming and malnutrition in his first home. We've mostly got it fixed now that I've finally found a good farrier. I do like letting them blow on their own, but his last abcess went a month and still hadn't done so. I soaked in iodine and epsom salts three times a day... And after 20days even started wrapping with a paste of epsom salts. The vet finally came to look for it and finding it with the hoof testers opened it. Yah, I hated have a hole at the bottom of his foot.... but I soaked it morning and night in iodine and epsom salts. Packed it with that black tar.... Itchimale... sp? Wrapped it with a pull up. Ace wrap or streatchy vet wrap. And then ducktaped the **** out of it. Day two he could walk around field and stall again. Day three you couldn't see any sign of pain... Basicly all I'm saying is if the pain gets really bad you'll have to make a decision. And getting it cut out isn't a horrible thing to do, just shouldn't be first choice
     
    11-04-2013, 02:03 PM
  #39
Yearling
I agree with you there about it not being first choice. The abscess had come up from the hoof entirely, and it was in the coronary band and the infection was making it's way up his leg. So the farrier really wouldn't have been able to do anything. The poutice worked wonders and within a number of days, like your horse Diddly was completely sound again, and still is :) Touch wood.
     
    11-04-2013, 03:30 PM
  #40
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by CandyCanes    
So Diddly is lame... Again. I've had him 4 months, and he's already been lame twice.
I feel your pain. I've owned Red for about a year and a half now. Last year he was fine. This year, he was out for 4 months Jan to April, due to getting his back leg in the fence.

Then out in June for front end lameness (crooked joints possibly).

Then just a month ago, found out he has catching stifle in his right hind.

And now I can't even ride him to keep him in shape for the catching stifle because his right front knee is twice the size of his left front, when he decided to escape the pasture last week. Probably banged it on a post or pulled something.

If he wasn't such a darn good horse, he'd be down the road already. I've spent so many thousands of dollars on vet bills this year, I'm ready to pull my hair out. Seriously. How much can one horse get hurt? And something different every time??


Glad to hear here your Diddly is doing better!!
     

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