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I would like to not have to shoe my horse

This is a discussion on I would like to not have to shoe my horse within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category

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        04-25-2013, 06:17 PM
      #11
    Weanling
    Trinity-- he is never lame. The chips look superficial to me. I get him trimmed every 6 weeks. Now you made me rethink my last post. I would like to try it barefoot for awhile again. I think I might overreact and panic because I think he will end up with terrible hoof problems. What is the worst that can happen if I leave him without shoes for say..the next 6 weeks?
         
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        04-25-2013, 10:03 PM
      #12
    Started
    Unshod horses usually benefit from having the farrier/trimmer out more often than shod horses. Keep track of how long it takes to start chipping, and go from there.
         
        04-25-2013, 10:30 PM
      #13
    Trained
    I am not sure if it saves you money to go barefoot, per se. Depending on how valuable you think your time is, it may not save anything. And, my horses were shod for a long time and none ever had a problem, I just made a personal choice to go barefoot. I always had someone else trim them until it became necessary for me to do it myself. From that exprience, I think the wisest use of one's money is investing the time and money in educating themselves about barefoot trimming and then deciding. I am the only barefoot rider of my riding buddies...that is their personal choice and their horses look fine to me.
         
        04-25-2013, 10:47 PM
      #14
    Green Broke
    We can't give you an opinion. Can't see your horse and watch him move and all that. If you think your farrier is out to scam you then you need a new farrier. Shoes make them more money in one way but in the time it takes them to shoe a horse they could barefoot trim several.
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        04-25-2013, 10:54 PM
      #15
    Trained
    Most farriers would prefer not to shoe, a trim is easier for them and quicker. However, a good farrier will do what is best for the horse. I would prefer a barefoot horse as well, but for 6 or 7 months of the year, I school, show & ride and I won't risk a tender footed horse. During the colder months when the riding isn't as extreme, they are barefoot, and I do the trimming, so yeah, I would love it if they could stay that way, save me a bunch of cash, but then again, I could lose out on riding time.
         
        04-26-2013, 06:12 AM
      #16
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Missy May    
    I am not sure if it saves you money to go barefoot, per se. Depending on how valuable you think your time is, it may not save anything. And, my horses were shod for a long time and none ever had a problem, I just made a personal choice to go barefoot. I always had someone else trim them until it became necessary for me to do it myself. From that exprience, I think the wisest use of one's money is investing the time and money in educating themselves about barefoot trimming and then deciding. I am the only barefoot rider of my riding buddies...that is their personal choice and their horses look fine to me.
    How is it possible that barefoot costs as much as keeping a horse shod? My guy gets a trim every 6 weeks for $30. (less often in winter) When he has his sliders on, it runs me a MINIMUM of $100 every 6 weeks to reset them.

    OP-I will tell you that getting my guy barefoot took some trial and error. Some horses get pretty tender at first and you may lose some ride time, or need to use boots. Only way I finally got him barefoot was to follow the advice of an old horseman friend-instead of pulling the shoes, let the feet grow out until they are almost falling off. Then, gently remove them and just trim very slightly and shape with the rasp. It took me about 4 months (I did it over a winter when I rode less) and he was rideable the whole time. I am not a fan of "barefoot" trimmers who are trained as such. Perhaps I just had a bad experience, but prefer a good farrier.

    As long as the chips are superficial, don't worry too much about them-you could rasp them a little if you like, to make them look better I suppose......
         
        04-26-2013, 07:17 AM
      #17
    Weanling
    Thanks for all of your responses. I only ride about once a week and don't do any showing or jumping so I'm thinking I will try barefoot for awhile and see how it goes.
    franknbeans likes this.
         
        04-26-2013, 10:07 AM
      #18
    Trained
    [QUOTE=franknbeans;2352081]How is it possible that barefoot costs as much as keeping a horse shod? My guy gets a trim every 6 weeks for $30. (less often in winter) When he has his sliders on, it runs me a MINIMUM of $100 every 6 weeks to reset them.


    QUOTE]

    I said, per se...and I should have been more clear, I meant if you decide to trim yourself (which is why I said it depends on how valuable your time is to you). In which case (if you decide to do it yourself) in the long run, yes, it is highly probable that it will save you money and the more horses you have the more probable that is. But, it will only "save" you the delta, not "all of what it would have cost" to shoe. And, it depends on how much shoeing cost you, e'g., when I went barefoot I used my horses for work and shoeing or trimming cost me nothing, so no delta. But, if one goes from paying for shoeing or trimming to doing it themselves, good equipment, and training (including an expert checking your work) is not "free". Which is why I said the best investment is education - which not only allows one to better determine if someone has trimmed or shod correctly which is a cost and "health" savings, it allows one to make an educated decision concerning to shoe or not.
         
        04-26-2013, 10:30 AM
      #19
    Started
    Not all horses need shoes, If my mare wasnt getting rode on so much gravel and rock she would be barefoot. As it is, I wear her feet off faster than she can grow them.

    A draft cross on the farm gets trail ridden alot, but minimal gravel/rock and not quite as hard/long as my mare. He is bare foot all year.

    A appy gelding on the farm has thinner walls, more brittle. No supplement will help, and his diet is the same as the rest of the herd. He is shod may-sept, with his thinner soles and chippy feet he can't take any gravel or rocks at all.

    I personally would be very wary of "barefoot trimmers". I think a good farrier, is a good farrier, and trying to 'pull the wool' over peoples eyes with fancy terms and expensive prices(I've heard barefoot trimmers charge double+ and request you trim every 4 weeks. More money, more often) is dishonest in my oppinion.

    I would recomend you go buy a good rasp, and rasp the edge off once a week, that should help reduce chipping. Keep a close eye on him for soreness. Going shoeless will always be my first choice.
    aforred likes this.
         
        04-26-2013, 10:32 AM
      #20
    Foal
    I would call the farrier first, most will come right out and put shoes back on if the horse has thrown soon after shoeing them for whatever reason. That seems to be the norm here in my area anyways, sort of a "guarantee" for the work they've done for the first couple weeks at least. It's possibly your horse needs to be shod just a little bit differently, and most farriers would be more than willing to come out and "fix" the problem. I would call them up and be very polite and apologetic: "I'm so sorry to bother you, but "Trigger" lost both shoes in the first week after being shod on X date. That's definitely not normal for him, so was wondering if you could come out and take a look, and we can figure out what to do about it." Most good farriers take a lot of pride in their work and would be more than willing to come out and rectify the situation if you give them a chance.

    I've actually had this happen to me, I switched farriers and my horse started throwing shoes a week or two in. I'm glad I had called that farrier back and let them know because, the first thing they said was "I was wondering if your horse was going to need to be shod more "full", no problem, I'll come out tomorrow afternoon and we'll get it sorted."

    I'd at least try this before going back to your old farrier, it's possible that it's just a minor thing that needs to be changed shoeing wise, and you've given the farrier a chance to fix the problem. If they're not willing to come back out, or the problem's not resolved, then you have your answer.

    As for going barefoot, it really depends on the horse. I would maybe ask the farrier about it when they come back out. It's not something a lot will "suggest" out of the blue when an owner has already specifically asked for them to come out and put shoes on. If you ask their opinion, most will be very up front and honest about it.
         

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