Just went semi shoeless - have questions - Page 7
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health > Hoof Care

Just went semi shoeless - have questions

This is a discussion on Just went semi shoeless - have questions within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Sore feet with shoeless horse

Like Tree17Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    11-12-2011, 07:14 AM
  #61
Trained
There is no such thing as teaching, only learning. I think some long dead wise man said that. What Mark(and many of us) try to do is present useful factual information about a subject that we have some knowledge, experience and most importantly, a passion about. Marks advice is given freely but it's certainly not cheap. It's there for you to dissect and research and question but if you choose to question the validity of it you had better have some proof and a thick skin. I would expect no less from any other professional.

Too often people only want to follow the advice that fits thier agenda rather than leaving thier mind open to accept the "inconvienent truth". I would much rather read a post from someone that is terse and borderline rude but is truly a well-educated professional than read some sugar-coated junk put up by an amatuer pretender (that IS NOT directed to Loosie) .
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    11-12-2011, 08:37 AM
  #62
Banned
Agreed, Kevin.

But why must a subject matter expert be agressive or abrasive in their presentation? If they have passion for their subject matter, and *want* to educate, why don't they present that information in the most accessible way possible? That is certainly what I tried to do as an instructor. And in all those years of teaching, no one ever said to me "I learn better if you really get in my face, and a little public humiliation really reinforces key concepts for me. So please, during this lesson, yell and belittle me a little. It'll help me learn." In fact, my observation was that most folks learn best when they're feeling relaxed, secure and confident; threaten or intimidate them, and the reasoning parts of their brains tend to shut down.

I also agree that if are actively pursuing information, you take it in what ever form in comes as long as it's solid information. This thread is a good example - there's a lot of terrific information in here that I've tried to take in; even though I don't care for the way it's presented. I wonder how much more I would have gotten out of it if it was presented differently?

Maybe I'm a Pollyanna, but I would hope for someone who is both a subject matter expert and an effective teacher. Too much to hope for? Maybe. But the folks I truly consider experts and mentors, that I learned the most from, were well qualified in both categories.
     
    11-13-2011, 05:26 PM
  #63
Trained
Mark, Kevin's assumption is correct. I left my horse's shoes on when I first got him because he was my first horse and I had very little horse knowledge. I kept him as is until I knew otherwise. I quickly learned to sift out fact from fiction in the information that was given by any particular horse owner and that no two see agree on anything.

When I got my TB at age 5, his hind shoes had wedge pads under the heel, at least I think that's what they are called. Basically high heels. My horse is rather straight in his back legs and had an absolutely horrid short strided trot when I got him. I'm not sure why the person who sold him to me thought that type of shoe would fix it. The farrier I chose to use couldn't figure it out either, so we switched to a normal shoe. I spent the next few years building up muscle on his hind end and doing lots of dressage training with him to attempt to improve his trot. It has become much better, but I wanted to see if I could do more. I know I mentioned earlier that he takes at least 40 minutes just to warm up, and even then, his version of tracking up involves his hind feet landing a good 6"s short of his front feet. As you've probably noticed, I'm a tad stubborn, so I did more research on how to better the situation. That's where barefoot came up.

I decided to do it last year. I spent the past 6 months feeding him biotin supplements to get his hooves into top shape, putting venice turpentine on his soles to help toughen them up, and invested in a pair of boots. I don't do anything on a whim. Plenty of forethought went into this. Tomorrow will be 2 weeks. He is completely fine on asphalt, concrete and an absolute monster on grass. We're talking W/T/C as a happy, snorting, squealing lunatic. (He's so fun when it's colder out) He's still very uncertain about softer surfaces. He'll walk in the indoor sand ring and the slightly harder outdoor ring, but he still has no interest in trotting. His feet look surprisingly good. The area where the nail holes were have caved in a bit, but there is otherwise no chipping in the other areas. I haven't attempted to ride him yet. I want to wait until he's being a dope on all surfaces involved, so I know he's not in any discomfort.

I don't know if I should have the foot trimmed futher to help him with the softer surfaces, or if it's just a matter of waiting for his sole to toughen up. Any advice would be appreciated.
     
    11-13-2011, 06:34 PM
  #64
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck    
I know I mentioned earlier that he takes at least 40 minutes just to warm up, and even then, his version of tracking up involves his hind feet landing a good 6"s short
Have you had a bodyworker to him? That is likely to be something upstairs, not his feet.

Quote:
I spent the past 6 months feeding him biotin supplements to get his hooves into top shape, putting venice turpentine on his soles
Biotin is one of many nutrients that are necessary & may need supplementing for good hooves. While studies have shown that biotin can help regardless, for optimum health, the rest of the nutrition should be well balanced too.(Pardon if that's stating the obvious). I would not use turps on horse's feet and certainly not long-term. Soles & frogs need to *grow* thick, not just be made harder, to provide necessary protection.

Quote:
I don't know if I should have the foot trimmed futher to help him with the softer surfaces, or if it's just a matter of waiting for his sole to toughen up. Any advice would be appreciated.
Depends how his feet were trimmed when the shoes came off whether he needs more now - I tend to take very little when I remove shoes & prefer to wait a week or 2 before doing a proper trim. But I don't think this would effect him on soft ground. I think it sounds more likely to be tendons or nerves - perhaps the wierd feeling of what he's walking on, tho if that was the case, you'd think grass would be similar. As he's got better over the last weeks, I'd be inclined to play it by ear a bit longer.
     
    11-13-2011, 06:51 PM
  #65
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie    
Have you had a bodyworker to him? That is likely to be something upstairs, not his feet.
Had thorough workup done on him. Flexion tests were clean. Nothing unusual his hips came up. Vet said he was weak in his LS area during pre-purchase exam which is part of why I worked on building muscle on him. I actually wasn't thinking feet for this problem, but rather removing the shoes would affect the hind end as a whole. That rip roaring trot he's currently doing on grass looks fantastic. Nothing short strides about it.



Quote:
Biotin is one of many nutrients that are necessary & may need supplementing for good hooves. While studies have shown that biotin can help regardless, for optimum health, the rest of the nutrition should be well balanced too.(Pardon if that's stating the obvious). I would not use turps on horse's feet and certainly not long-term. Soles & frogs need to *grow* thick, not just be made harder, to provide necessary protection.
I was told the turp helped draw out soreness and help the soles thicken, not harder. If that is wrong, I figure I'm a least providing his soles a barrier while they grow out. What I have seen since using the Biotin is a horse who was throwing shoes left and right last spring and needing toe clips to one who's feet now easily hold shoes past their due date. Even if it's not the biotin alone, my farrier sees a definite improvement in his feet.


Quote:
Depends how his feet were trimmed when the shoes came off whether he needs more now - I tend to take very little when I remove shoes & prefer to wait a week or 2 before doing a proper trim. But I don't think this would effect him on soft ground. I think it sounds more likely to be tendons or nerves - perhaps the wierd feeling of what he's walking on, tho if that was the case, you'd think grass would be similar. As he's got better over the last weeks, I'd be inclined to play it by ear a bit longer.
At first I thought there was some stress on his tendons too, but that doesn't explain his exhuberance for running around on the grass. He seems elated to be on a surface where he's free to stretch his legs. It's a soft gushy grass, so I also don't get why he's fine there, but not on sand. I will leave it alone a bit longer and see how it plays out. He's a little better everday, so that's always good.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Shoeless Puck...should I do it? MyBoyPuck Horse Health 1 10-03-2011 09:40 PM
15" Tex Tan Semi QH Bar wlukes Tack and Equipment Classifieds 7 02-12-2010 02:41 PM
Cat Troubles...HELP! semi-long free_sprtd Other Pets 7 12-04-2008 01:53 AM
pictures of my semi-new horse..?wat you think of him? cleveland Horse Talk 4 07-07-2007 10:15 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:14 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0