Laminitis - Isolated incident? - Page 3
 
 

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Laminitis - Isolated incident?

This is a discussion on Laminitis - Isolated incident? within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category

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        01-08-2013, 11:37 AM
      #21
    Trained
    That's exactly my point recovered vs managed. So the first horse would have been the better choice, provided the trimmer would come with him
         
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        01-08-2013, 11:54 AM
      #22
    Foal
    Good Point My horse experienced friend that saw the first horse with me got the name and number of the farrier. She is pretty excited about trying her with her own mare.
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        01-08-2013, 01:02 PM
      #23
    Green Broke
    With regard to shoes, when my gelding "foundered" those many years ago, the vet wanted shoes put on to which I complied. However, it was quickly evident that it was just too painful for him to wear them so they came off the next day. He did recover nicely without them and remained forever barefoot after that day.

    With regard to terminology, I had always heard "founder" used in the casual sense and "laminitis" used in the formal sense - depending who you were talking with (eg the neighbour down the road, the farrier or the vet) the symptoms, prognosis and treatment was the same.
    Merlot likes this.
         
        01-08-2013, 01:12 PM
      #24
    Weanling
    My aunt had a critically foundered pony. She was too lame to leave barefoot. After a month of specialized shoeing, she was sound enough to go barefoot. I can only argue my point bc I have seen it with my own eyes. You can't disagree with facts.

    There is no "cure" for founder. Once they're rotated, they're rotated and you begin managing it as to not have any more rotation. Regardless of HOW you keep the horse sound, it has to be done .... With shoes or with out depends on the individual case/animal.

    Laminitis is also managed, not cured. I have never seen a laminitis horse have only one episode. This is not to say it can't be so, but most horses I have seen had to be properly managed as to not have another flare up. I hav also seen horses have flare ups when everything is being managed correctly.

    You are very very nieve to make a generalized statement like the above about shoes/barefoot. There is not one way that will work for every single horse and to state that is insanely uneducated.
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        01-08-2013, 05:07 PM
      #25
    Yearling
    I rehabbed a paint mare with acute laminitus from droughted grass when the drought became really bad here one summer about 4 or 5 years ago. We caught it very fast, it was a one time indecent, she was over it in a week to 10 days and never even showed a fever ring despite being 4 legged lame at onset. It never repeated after that, even on pasture. She was not IR or overweight and had no predisposition for laminitus. She did not need shoes and was sound barefoot as soon as the inflamation was gone. It was over fast because we caught it fast and took fast action to treat. I removed all the load bearing wall at the toe and quarters and booted her, we iced and took all sugar out of her diet as well as took her off the grass of course. One time events DO happen. Like everything else horse, it depends.
    deserthorsewoman likes this.
         
        01-08-2013, 05:26 PM
      #26
    Trained
    Fast horse, you are not correct - on my naivity, along with other statements! I never said barefoot was always best, just that in this condition peripheral loading devices are not. I am aware that traditionally rotation is considered incureable - and believe that's so if the horse is shod - but it is indeed usually able to be corrected - not just managed palliatively - with the right approach. So is laminitis, althouhh some of the underlying causes, such as insulin resistance may not be correctable... tho there is some exciting research being done on magnesium to suggest this could possible be an answer to that too!
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        01-08-2013, 06:04 PM
      #27
    Trained
    It also very much depends on if and how much the tip of P3 is damaged/deteriorating. If half of the bone is gone, its incurable, and the horse will be, at best, barely pasture sound.
    If caught early, it can be reversed. Period.
    Muppetgirl likes this.
         
        01-08-2013, 08:21 PM
      #28
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Trinity3205    
    I rehabbed a paint mare with acute laminitus from droughted grass when the drought became really bad here one summer about 4 or 5 years ago. We caught it very fast, it was a one time indecent, she was over it in a week to 10 days and never even showed a fever ring despite being 4 legged lame at onset. It never repeated after that, even on pasture. She was not IR or overweight and had no predisposition for laminitus. She did not need shoes and was sound barefoot as soon as the inflamation was gone. It was over fast because we caught it fast and took fast action to treat. I removed all the load bearing wall at the toe and quarters and booted her, we iced and took all sugar out of her diet as well as took her off the grass of course. One time events DO happen. Like everything else horse, it depends.
    It's too bad more ppl don't do this. It amazes me at how uneducated most horse owners actually are about thing like this, as well as nutrition and feeds.

    A job well done and I'm sure your horse is very thankful :)
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        01-09-2013, 01:30 AM
      #29
    Trained
    It doesnt amaze me at all how little *good* info many horse owners have, especially when incorrect anecdotal and heresay - such as inability to correct rotation for eg - is so commonly bandied about still, even by some farriers and vets who havent learned about recent research and practices, etc. it does however amaze me that you say this in light of your last post, which some could call 'insanely uneducated'! The amound of bad info and lack of good is one reason why I think owners doing their own study is so vital.<br />
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        01-09-2013, 01:43 AM
      #30
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by loosie    
    it doesnt amaze me at all how little *good* info many horse owners have, especially when incorrect anecdotal and heresay - such as inability to correct rotation for eg - is so commonly bandied about still, even by some farriers and vets who havent learned about recent research and practices, etc. it does however amaze me that you say this in light of your last post, which some could call 'insanely uneducated'! The amound of bad info and lack of good is one reason why I think owners doing their own study is so vital.<br />
    <font size="1"><i>Posted via Mobile Device</i></font>
    LoL
    If speaking of my experience with the disease and calling you out on your round about way of stating that laminitis/foundered horses shouldn't be shod is uneducated, then yes... I am quite uneducated.
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