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Laminitis MUCH worse after trim

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  • Durasole for founder
  • Laminitis worse

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    04-13-2013, 05:31 PM
  #11
Weanling
I would be very angry if my farrier rasped my horse's front hoof wall that thin.

I wish I had useful advice to offer. :( Best of luck and well-wishes to your horse!
     
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    04-13-2013, 05:34 PM
  #12
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trinity3205    
IMO, Id try casting this horses feet and stop soaking the foot as it softens the sole and makes the horse more sore. Casting will provide immediate support and relief for both the laminitus and the trim. Also Durasole may help.

Also, Im assuming the reason for laminitus has been remedied and removed.
Thanks. He was soaked / kept barefoot as per the recommendations of the vet. Will call him and discuss casting (I'm not even sure if my farrier does that). Do you know what the ingredients of "Durasole" are?

The reason for the laminitis is not quite clear yet. We still have snow on the ground, so absolutely no fresh grass. He was / is on 100% grass hay (no alfalfa at all), and has never received grain for at least the last two years that I had him. He was outside on free feed grass hay for the winter, but that hasn't changed from previous years, where he's done fine. He is now stalled and on limited feed (soaked grass hay).
Since it's really not a typical time for it, the vet suspects a metabolic issue (Cushings or EMS), which we will test for as soon as the inflammation's gone down and he's off the Bute.
     
    04-13-2013, 05:35 PM
  #13
Green Broke
I'll be anxious to see what the Forum Trimmers thoughts are.

In the meantime, can you afford another vet bill to have the vet come out and ultrasound the legs for strained or torn tendons?

It is entirely possible the hooves were cut too short in one strike and the result is stretched/strained or torn tendons.

I am at the tail end of that little piece of living H**l right now. My horse foundered 8-9 degrees on the LF, 5 degrees on the RF. The very well schooled and expensive rehab farrier cut too much heel at once and the result was torn tendons. The vet was beyond livid when he did the ultrasounds because he had given the nod of approval for this guy to work on my horse.

Ditto the styrofoam five minutes ago. You need to get pressure off the heels right away.

I put my horse in Boa boots and home made lily pads for 8 solid months. By solid I mean he was in the boots during day when he was outside and I took them off when he came in at night. The vet gave me a prescription for the thickness of the pads and how to cut them.

I had to cold hose and poultice that horse's legs twice a day for several months. I was finally able to stop poulticing the legs but, to this day, if the night temps fall below 50 and the day temps are 65 or less, he wears quilts and wraps to keep his legs warm.

Yes, it surely did hinder the founder re-hab time. We think he has completely de-rotated (Mr. WTW was in the hospital, so no $$$ for hoof x-rays for awhile:( but that has only happened in the last couple months, thanks to the tendon injuries.

Long story and I'm sorry but my point is have ultrasounds done, if you can possibly affor them and the vet has the equipment on his truck. I would not want to load the horse up and make him travel
     
    04-13-2013, 05:35 PM
  #14
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by existentialpony    
I would be very angry if my farrier rasped my horse's front hoof wall that thin.

I wish I had useful advice to offer. :( Best of luck and well-wishes to your horse!
Trust me, I am...
     
    04-13-2013, 05:41 PM
  #15
Green Broke
I'd never use the farrier again. Absolutely no reason to rasp the wall like that, none at all.

The foot also isn't balanced from what I see. It looks like he chopped the toe off and left the quarters. That's about as much as I can tell from the pictures though.

I can't say anything about the founder issue though as I have no experience or knowledge on it past what others have already stated.
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    04-13-2013, 05:46 PM
  #16
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by walkinthewalk    
I'll be anxious to see what the Forum Trimmers thoughts are.

In the meantime, can you afford another vet bill to have the vet come out and ultrasound the legs for strained or torn tendons?

It is entirely possible the hooves were cut too short in one strike and the result is stretched/strained or torn tendons.

I am at the tail end of that little piece of living H**l right now. My horse foundered 8-9 degrees on the LF, 5 degrees on the RF. The very well schooled and expensive rehab farrier cut too much heel at once and the result was torn tendons. The vet was beyond livid when he did the ultrasounds because he had given the nod of approval for this guy to work on my horse.

Ditto the styrofoam five minutes ago. You need to get pressure off the heels right away.

I put my horse in Boa boots and home made lily pads for 8 solid months. By solid I mean he was in the boots during day when he was outside and I took them off when he came in at night. The vet gave me a prescription for the thickness of the pads and how to cut them.

I had to cold hose and poultice that horse's legs twice a day for several months. I was finally able to stop poulticing the legs but, to this day, if the night temps fall below 50 and the day temps are 65 or less, he wears quilts and wraps to keep his legs warm.

Yes, it surely did hinder the founder re-hab time. We think he has completely de-rotated (Mr. WTW was in the hospital, so no $$$ for hoof x-rays for awhile:( but that has only happened in the last couple months, thanks to the tendon injuries.

Long story and I'm sorry but my point is have ultrasounds done, if you can possibly affor them and the vet has the equipment on his truck. I would not want to load the horse up and make him travel
Thanks. Yes, luckily I am in a situation where I can afford vet visits for him (that's why I have only one horse and not 5, haha). The vet will come out on Monday and take a look (he's gone for the weekend).

TBH, the thought of several months of intensive medical treatment is kind of daunting (I board and work full time), but he'll get whatever it takes to make him comfortable.

Did you have any issues with the boots rubbing?
     
    04-13-2013, 05:55 PM
  #17
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iseul    
I'd never use the farrier again. Absolutely no reason to rasp the wall like that, none at all.

The foot also isn't balanced from what I see. It looks like he chopped the toe off and left the quarters. That's about as much as I can tell from the pictures though.

I can't say anything about the founder issue though as I have no experience or knowledge on it past what others have already stated.
Posted via Mobile Device
Yeah, no worries, won't ever happen again.
He's the barn's regular farrier who does their show horses too, and came highly recommended by the BO...
     
    04-13-2013, 06:09 PM
  #18
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Regula    
Did you have any issues with the boots rubbing?
No, thank goodness but they had already been custom fit to my horse when I thought I was going to be trail riding him.

When the dial finally broke on one boot, I ordered a pair of Cavallos. If you end up going this route, stay away from Cavallos for rehabbing - they allow for way too much hoof movement inside the boot; they set my horse back in recovery time, nearly a week.

I duct taped the broken dial Boa on until the new ones arrived.

You're right it is grueling and makes one really cranky when it goes on seemingly forever - especially if you're young enough that you have a family that needs you. Thankfully I am fully retired; I'd've had to get up at 4:00 AM every day, had I still been working

The day I was able to stop poulticing him was as glorious as the first day I was able to leave the diaper bag home when my son got out of diapers, a gazillion years ago

Would there be someone, trustworthy at the barn that might be able to take care of your horse in the mornings, if it comes to that? Even if you have to give them a bit of money for their time?

That would leave you to do the evenings, if your home life allowed enough time for that.

I hope the poor trimming doesn't encompass the tendons in any way. If it does, hopefully your vet will give you the proper approach. I would also be happy to share what my vet had me do.
     
    04-13-2013, 06:35 PM
  #19
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Regula    
he claimed that it's normal for them to become worse for a few days after trimming
It is unfortunately common for them to be more sore after a trim, **depending how they're trimmed** If any sole has been removed, if the horse is left having to support himself on already compromised laminae - that is, peripherally loaded on hoof walls - this will cause more pain **and damage. While heels may have been high & need lowering, overzealous lowering, especially if the horse is currently acutely laminitic can also cause further discomfort. **It is not necessarily the farrier's fault if a horse is sore post trim - could be timing & coincidence for eg, but that he thinks it's 'normal'...

If the hooves are trimmed to relieve the assaulted walls from weightbearing, to relieve the laminae & inflamed corium, the horse should be no worse than before, frequently noticably better.

Quote:
Should I put boots on him? Can you even put boots on for longer periods of time without rubbing?
Yes, boots or otherwise good padding *under the foot, not the walls, to give the horse soft support & protection, to allow him to stand as much as possible, but keeping him in an environment(whether that's a stable or not) with soft bedding that encourages him to lie down. You can get 'Therapy' boots from Easycare, which are designed for leaving on sick horses in the paddock, designed to be pretty comfortable & be relatively free from rubbing. Otherwise Epics or other 'low profile' boots you can add padding to can be acceptable if needed full time. If the environment permits though, you may get away with some soft foam &/or a baby nappy & a few rolls of duct tape. Always change padding/boots at least daily, clean feet & allow them some time to dry out.

A new book I've just borrowed from a friend & found to be AWESOME & so comprehensive, highly recommend is "The Pony That Did Not Die" by Andrew & Nicky Bowe
     
    04-13-2013, 07:00 PM
  #20
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iseul    
I'd never use the farrier again. Absolutely no reason to rasp the wall like that, none at all.
You're quite incorrect in assuming there is no reason to take walls back. As he's only done it to the very front of the toes & left the toe quarters weightbearing, as it appears he's dressed the toes from in front, rather than bevelling the ground surface, it could be that he didn't remove enough. Need some good pics - any chance of posting xrays? - before making much comment on what perhaps should be done.

To those that said the horse shouldn't have been trimmed, while I have no idea what they were like pre-trim and if the horse is in extreme discomfort it may be necessary to wait for the initial 'attack' to subside first, it is VITAL that the horse is trimmed *to aid function & remove mechanical stress ASAP when laminitic.

It's unclear whether the farrier removed any sole & if he did that is a mistake, but it could be that the regular soaking has just further softened his soles enough to allow further stress to the laminae & damage.
     

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