Laminitis MUCH worse after trim - Page 3
 
 

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Laminitis MUCH worse after trim

This is a discussion on Laminitis MUCH worse after trim within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Dry feet after laminitis
  • The vet recommended a cold poultice for my laminitic horse

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    04-13-2013, 08:12 PM
  #21
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie    
You're quite incorrect in assuming there is no reason to take walls back. As he's only done it to the very front of the toes & left the toe quarters weightbearing, as it appears he's dressed the toes from in front, rather than bevelling the ground surface, it could be that he didn't remove enough. Need some good pics - any chance of posting xrays? - before making much comment on what perhaps should be done.
I'm curious then, what reason is there, ever, to thin a wall out so much? The foot, from what I see in the picture, is now curved inward instead of being flush with the rest of the hoof wall. There is a dip that should not be there.
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    04-13-2013, 08:38 PM
  #22
Green Broke
Instead of hosing the hooves and further softening the sole, there are some frozen options

1. Keep a couple bags of frozen peas in the freezer. Duct tape them to the hooves. When the bags do finally break - no big deal, throw everything away.

2. I bought one of these "Big Black Boots" and it works like a charm. I keep it in a WalMart bag in the freezer. If it stays in there, the hope is I won't need it again

Big Black Boot

3. A lady on another forum is ordering these. I would have tried them had I found them before I saw the Ice Horse boot.

I'm pretty sure Jeffers is the cheapest place to buy them.

EZ Ice Hoof/Founder Pack, 1 pack - Jeffers

Using anyone of these three will save the sole, plus free up your time to do something else for 20 minutes, but still be able to keep an eye on your horse.

20 minutes is the max to use ice or it becomes counter-productive.
     
    04-13-2013, 09:45 PM
  #23
Weanling
Here's a video from today (sorry, sideways and crappy phone camera, but you get the point).

VID_20130413_084430 - YouTube

He has NEVER been this sore before. I do understand that trimming can make the horse a bit more sore, but I refuse to believe that it is ok and "normal" for him to walk like that after a trim.

Yes, the farrier has removed some of the sole (despite vet's written instructions not to do so).
So from what I understand here, the reason for rasping the hoof wall in front is to take the weight off the tip and distribute it across the toe quarters, right?

Ok, so the current plan is
- no more soaking, but icing instead.
- Styrofoam / gel boot or other soft padding across the entire area of the hoof, not just the walls
- upping the Bute
- vet appointment on Monday, potentially with ultrasound to check for tendon damage.
- fire the farrier
- pray for the best :P
     
    04-13-2013, 10:08 PM
  #24
Yearling
Equicast Hoof Wear - Protection System

You don't want to shoe this horse with any kind of rim shoe without any solar and frog support. Also, casting is a much better option than boots simply for the simplicity, no fitting issues and not having 2 hours of boot cleaning and leaving the horse without protection each day. I highly recommend looking into it because one well applied cast can make laminitic horses and thin soled horses sound almost right away while they heal up. Also boots soften the sole because the foot will not dry out in most of them. If the foot is really wet, you can use a hairdryer to help dry them out and I would apply Durasole for sure ot the dry warm foot. It really helps with sole sensitivity. But a couple nights in dry shavings will do alot.

Just some things to think about. No farrier or trimmer worth one whit would leave a laminitic horse worse than when they showed up.
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    04-13-2013, 10:16 PM
  #25
Trained
The farrier may have made him worse, but it is possible that he was getting worse anyway. Laminitis does tend to get more and more severe over several days. I suspect that he was trying to relieve pressure on the front of the hoof in order to try to prevent rotation of the coffin bone.
     
    04-13-2013, 10:19 PM
  #26
Yearling
Farrier should have at least recommended something and not left the horse more immobile that he started with. Despite what the vet said. There are loads of things that could be tried to get this horse more comfortable.
loosie and Cherie like this.
     
    04-13-2013, 10:39 PM
  #27
Yearling
You should get him to stand in a huge bucket of ice water from the knees down. New research indicates that just soaking or standing in ice is not enough. Or get ice boots. Either way you need to cool the blood in the legs as well as in the hooves
     
    04-13-2013, 11:05 PM
  #28
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Regula    
Here's a video from today (sorry, sideways and crappy phone camera, but you get the point).

VID_20130413_084430 - YouTube

He has NEVER been this sore before. I do understand that trimming can make the horse a bit more sore, but I refuse to believe that it is ok and "normal" for him to walk like that after a trim.

Yes, the farrier has removed some of the sole (despite vet's written instructions not to do so).
So from what I understand here, the reason for rasping the hoof wall in front is to take the weight off the tip and distribute it across the toe quarters, right?

Ok, so the current plan is
- no more soaking, but icing instead.
- Styrofoam / gel boot or other soft padding across the entire area of the hoof, not just the walls
- upping the Bute
- vet appointment on Monday, potentially with ultrasound to check for tendon damage.
- fire the farrier
- pray for the best :P
That was tearful

Yes to the plan but an addedum following "fire the farrier" would be "find a new and better qualified farrier". We've had that conversation a couple times, on here, and many of us agree the best doesn't always mean having a lot of certs hanging off their finger tips. The highest certified and best guy within 75 miles is who cut my horse too short, resulting in torn ligaments and the vet had ok'd him.

Meaning, I don't know what to say in terms of finding somebody new

The EquiCast Trinity suggested might be a great solution for you, since you board and work. It would provide your horse with the cushioning he needs and alleviate the need for you to spend endless hours booting/padding/removing/cleaning hooves & boots.

Along with cleaning the boots and pads every night, I also kept the hooves cleaned and put Absorbine "Thrush Remedy" alongside the frogs and in the stretched whiteline. My horse never got a hint of thrush or seedy toe the entire time he wore boots but I spent a lot of maintenance time to avoid it

The EquiCast might be your ticket to freedom, in that regard

Sunday, when you get the to the barn, check his ankles for puffiness and/or heat. If there's any sort of tendon damage, it can show up that way.

At the onset of my horse's tendon damage, I had to apply heat then cold for about ten days. Then it was cold hosing all the time because we were then in the heat of summer with temps around 100 degrees most of the time. I then poulticed, then wraps on top of that. There are poultices safe to use under vet wrap.

The vet had given me a poultice to sweat my horse but I had an allergic reaction to it (my mouth swelled inside), so he gave me the ok to use an all natural cold poultice which my horse was a lot happier with, anyway.
     
    04-13-2013, 11:31 PM
  #29
Started
Equicast is awesome and not that hard to learn. Just have all of your ducks in a row and visualize the process before you start since you have to be quick once you wet the casting. Have everything you need accessable within reach.
     
    04-14-2013, 12:05 AM
  #30
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldhorselady    
Equicast is awesome and not that hard to learn. Just have all of your ducks in a row and visualize the process before you start since you have to be quick once you wet the casting. Have everything you need accessable within reach.
Ok, thanks a lot everyone. Will look into EquiCast then.
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