Learning to Trim
   

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Learning to Trim

This is a discussion on Learning to Trim within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Learning to trim horses hooves
  • Learning to trim my horses hooves

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  • 1 Post By loosie

 
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    02-15-2013, 05:44 PM
  #1
Weanling
Learning to Trim

I am wanting to learn to trim my horses' hooves. Where might one start to learn this process? I prefer to do a clinic or something as asking my farrier seems counterproductive (Hey, can I put you out of a job at my farm?). So I am thinking of finding a class or a clinic. I live in the SE so flying to California or something isn't going to work, but if anyone has any suggestions for the south, please let me know. It seems so cost effective in the long run to do this myself.
     
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    02-15-2013, 07:12 PM
  #2
Trained
I'm personally more than happy to help my clients learn to trim. I think it's in the best interest of their horses that they know the hows & whys, and are able to give them more regular trims. BUT I do find that the vast majority of people who want to learn find that it's not quite as easy as it may look - both in terms of the hard physical work, horse's behaviour, etc & also getting everything right. Therefore, while they may end up employing me a bit less frequently, it doesn't generally do me out of a job!

Unfortunately while a good workshop/clinic & trimming 'recipe' may give you understanding of the basics, there are just too many variables & exceptions for a recipe. Therefore whether people do workshops, get lessons from the trimmer, whatever, I think it's prudent to keep booking the farrier regularly for some time & doing interim 'brush up' trims in between times, then when you have the hang of it, still employ the trimmer frequently to check/correct your work.

There are also a few different 'styles' based on different principles, not to mention better or worse trimmers, teachers, etc, so it's worth studying the theory, different ideas, people & pros & cons of them before deciding on who's workshop to attend.
     
    02-15-2013, 07:19 PM
  #3
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie    
I'm personally more than happy to help my clients learn to trim. I think it's in the best interest of their horses that they know the hows & whys, and are able to give them more regular trims. BUT I do find that the vast majority of people who want to learn find that it's not quite as easy as it may look - both in terms of the hard physical work, horse's behaviour, etc & also getting everything right. Therefore, while they may end up employing me a bit less frequently, it doesn't generally do me out of a job!

Unfortunately while a good workshop/clinic & trimming 'recipe' may give you understanding of the basics, there are just too many variables & exceptions for a recipe. Therefore whether people do workshops, get lessons from the trimmer, whatever, I think it's prudent to keep booking the farrier regularly for some time & doing interim 'brush up' trims in between times, then when you have the hang of it, still employ the trimmer frequently to check/correct your work.

There are also a few different 'styles' based on different principles, not to mention better or worse trimmers, teachers, etc, so it's worth studying the theory, different ideas, people & pros & cons of them before deciding on who's workshop to attend.
Thanks! I agree that I will continue to probably employ my farrier. I am only learning to trim a healthy horses' hooves, so maybe he will be open to that - he does a very, very good job. But I do occasionally foster horses that will definitely need a professional and corrective trimming. I am not ready to take a major certification to deal with such issues. I think I would need several years of trimming before attempting something so major.

Do you have any books or videos you would recommend on the theory? I would never start to trim from a book as I am a 'hands on' learner, but I would love to have some direction as to good theory and techniques. Thanks!
     
    02-15-2013, 08:03 PM
  #4
Trained
Check out the forum thread in my signature below
     
    02-15-2013, 08:07 PM
  #5
Green Broke
Better have : strong arms and hands, strong back, legs and knees. And be able to get out of the way if the horse pitches a fit.
     
    02-15-2013, 08:54 PM
  #6
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevenson    
better have : strong arms and hands, strong back, legs and knees.
Nah, you'll grow 'em for the occasion!
FaydesMom likes this.
     
    02-15-2013, 08:59 PM
  #7
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevenson    
better have : strong arms and hands, strong back, legs and knees. And be able to get out of the way if the horse pitches a fit.
No worries there. The horses I would be trimming are my horses, and since I work with their feet daily, they are really good about it. My job is manual labor, so I am fairly undaunted about doing 3 horses feet every 4-6 weeks.

Thanks loosie! I will read those links!!
     
    02-17-2013, 11:33 AM
  #8
Yearling
In SC Claudia Garner might still be teaching. She is certainly one of the most knowledgable people I've met when it comes to a horses feet. She does a very comprehensive course (covers a lot more than just trimming) and no, I haven't taken her course, but it's all unshod natural trimming. She does not promote or teach shoeing a horse.
You can googe her. I believe she is located outside of Columbia.
     
    02-17-2013, 12:04 PM
  #9
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by its lbs not miles    
In SC Claudia Garner might still be teaching. She is certainly one of the most knowledgable people I've met when it comes to a horses feet. She does a very comprehensive course (covers a lot more than just trimming) and no, I haven't taken her course, but it's all unshod natural trimming. She does not promote or teach shoeing a horse.
You can googe her. I believe she is located outside of Columbia.
Thanks! She is still teaching, but her course is more for professionals (5K per course). But I will email her and see if she knows anyone that just does a "trim your own horses" course. Not looking to go pro ... yet.
     
    02-17-2013, 02:47 PM
  #10
Green Broke
I started by reading the Pete Ramey textbook. I watch my farrier and ask questions. I watch how his hooves grow between sessions and we talk about what my opinion was on what needed doing and wed discuss that and what the farrier saw. She's basically teaching me now to trim specifically my horse and I'm ok with that.
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