Learning to trim your own?
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health > Hoof Care

Learning to trim your own?

This is a discussion on Learning to trim your own? within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Learn to trim your own horse hoof
  • Careing for horses hooves

Like Tree3Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    02-26-2014, 02:46 AM
  #1
Started
Learning to trim your own?

***Long story short my farrier lives 6 hours away, and it would make it easier for me and my horses if I know how to keep up with their hoof care on my own... If you don't want to read the novel you can happily skip to the next asterisked paragraph and read from there


The farrier I have used for the last 6 years has recently moved almost 6 hours away from where I (and all his other clients) live, however he does travel down every 6 weeks to do all our horses.. Because of this, and the fact that the only other decent farrier around is very hard to get hold of, I would like to learn to trim my own horses, or at the very least know how to do preventative maintenance between trims.. Since my farrier lives so far away, I can't just flick him a text and ask him to come out in closer intervals while my horses hooves are growing faster in the summer.
Plus I actually think that my horses hooves could be better shape-wise, though I have not had one lame step while using my farrier.

I already know how to whip off loose shoes and how to find and dig out abscesses, but I would like to know more.
Maybe one day I will find an actual barefoot trimming school to go to, but right now I know of none, so bad me... I'm relying on the internet to help me out... Cringe, I know.

So far the only tools I have are hoof nippers and an extremely sharp hoof knife.. But I will slowly collect a few more things before I start attempting to do my own horses hooves... this is actually kind of nerve wracking!

***I'm not planning on just getting in there and hacking away, btw.. I plan on doing a little to start with, between having a professional farrier out to visit, until I get more confident and knowledgeable.. and I will start out just on either Mitch or Gemma, DJ has funny shaped hooves and curved coronet bands especially in her back hooves after a long period of hoof neglect.. She also has twisted stifles and wonky hips, so I don't want to muck around with that until I seriously know what I'm doing (so probably not for a long time haha)

What tools would help me out? Apart from the obvious rasp/nippers/hoof knife?
And what would all you experienced people recommend doing to start with? I have been doing some research on hoof mapping, and have watched Gene Ovnicek's videos of hoof mapping on youtube, though I wouldn't be confident enough to act upon my own hoof mapping without photo guidance from more experienced people! Two of my horses are thoroughbreds, though so far they are doing just fine being barefoot and trimmed by a farrier, so I see no sense in wanting shoes on, so why not learn myself?
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    02-26-2014, 07:40 AM
  #2
Yearling
Pretty much the same question was asked and answered in this thread:

Need to start trimming feet inbetween the farrier's visits...advice?

Good luck!
     
    02-26-2014, 09:42 AM
  #3
Trained
You should talk with your farrier and see if you can be taught to at least touch them up in between visits.

I've only ever needed a rasp for my horse.
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    02-26-2014, 12:28 PM
  #4
Yearling
I agree with Dancing. You really do need a rasp more than a nipper. I haven't used my nipper in a year.

When your farrier comes, ask him to teach you.
The hoof mapping is great and Pete Ramey's book is a good place to start. Ramey's book is real simply written, and gives you basic how-to.
     
    02-26-2014, 12:41 PM
  #5
Trained
Pete Ramey's book is awesome. It's expensive but its a textbook.
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    02-26-2014, 01:20 PM
  #6
Yearling
I don't know about expensive. I was talking about his first book. I haven't read any others.

I think the ELPO website is good education, too. Getting used to seeing what a well trimmed hoof looks like and why. But always keeping in mind that most hooves are a work in progress and not sacrificing angle to get that perfect foot print.
     
    02-27-2014, 08:42 PM
  #7
Trained
Hi,

Basically, hands-on instruction from a good farrier/trimmer, who is also willing & able to adequately explain the principles behind the practice, is by far preferable, and after learning initially I think it's a good idea to still get a professional every other time or such, until you really know your way. But if no good instruction is available where you're at, I really think Pete Ramey's 'Under The Horse' series is really valuable.

Quote:
Originally Posted by HollyBubbles    
I already know how to whip off loose shoes and how to find and dig out abscesses,
I would STRONGLY advise you don't even consider digging out suspected(it's often not at all clear to find them) abscesses, especially if you don't even know the principles of maintenance trimming yet!!

What tools? I'd add a good rasp(necessity) & a hoof stand & cut proof gloves to your kit. Oh & a wire brush - great for cleaning out crud the hoof pick may miss before trimming, so increasing the life of tools.
waresbear likes this.
     
    02-27-2014, 08:59 PM
  #8
Trained
That is how I learned to trim hooves, from various farriers, first when I was 12, a family friend was a farrier, then about 15 years later from another farrier and now from my current farrier who I have used for over 20 years. He critiques my trims and helps me out to correct things.
     
    02-28-2014, 02:17 AM
  #9
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie    
Hi,

Basically, hands-on instruction from a good farrier/trimmer, who is also willing & able to adequately explain the principles behind the practice, is by far preferable, and after learning initially I think it's a good idea to still get a professional every other time or such, until you really know your way. But if no good instruction is available where you're at, I really think Pete Ramey's 'Under The Horse' series is really valuable.



I would STRONGLY advise you don't even consider digging out suspected(it's often not at all clear to find them) abscesses, especially if you don't even know the principles of maintenance trimming yet!!

What tools? I'd add a good rasp(necessity) & a hoof stand & cut proof gloves to your kit. Oh & a wire brush - great for cleaning out crud the hoof pick may miss before trimming, so increasing the life of tools.
Sorry, I should have worded that better... I know when my horses have an abscess, and I have my farrier find it and dig the initial hole for it, I just keep the hole open after that until it has finished draining and can close up without reforming an abscess. But now that I can't have my farrier out on a whim for things like that I find another farrier, or if that fails I get a vet out, I just find that they don't dig sufficient holes and the bill is 5x more expensive. I generally know where they are located, but I don't own hoof testers and I don't just go digging willy nilly in there.
     
    02-28-2014, 02:25 AM
  #10
Started
I'll be getting a rasp in the next few weeks at the Horse of The Year show, I figure I can't do much harm with a rasp in between trims the only reason I have the nippers and not the rasp is because my granddad gave me the nippers and the hoof knife, his rasp was old and no good however.

I would rather learn first hand off a farrier, and my farrier is great, but I feel almost awkward asking him questions that I don't already know the majority of the answer to, and I don't think I could learn from him comfortably. It's nothing that he says or does, I just don't feel comfortable around him personally.
The other farrier I use is so darn good looking I trip over my words when trying to ask questions and go bright red while paying him....

There is a barefoot trimmer somewhere around my area I would like to try once I can get a hold of her details, just for a difference of opinion, so maybe I will be able to learn first hand from her.

I have noticed that Mitch(tb, about 10 months out of shoes now) has very flat hooves compared to Gemma(mini), is that a trimming thing, or is it a genetics thing? Considering that both are always done by the same farrier as each other.
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What is the difference between a barefoot trim & a farrier trim? flytobecat Horse Health 20 10-12-2013 06:04 PM
Learning to Trim? Monty4ever Hoof Care 7 06-23-2013 02:55 AM
Learning to Trim 2SCHorses Hoof Care 9 02-17-2013 03:47 PM
Learning to trim Hooves, nervous! DoubleS Horse Health 4 07-15-2012 12:59 PM
Learning to trim feet musicalmarie1 Horse Talk 12 03-14-2012 03:28 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:46 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0