Looking for ways to prevent "soft tissue" injuries within the hoof
 
 

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Looking for ways to prevent "soft tissue" injuries within the hoof

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  • Horse agony de-feet hoof nerve blocking injuries ocd
  • Soft tissueinjury in equine foot

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    01-17-2014, 04:07 PM
  #1
Green Broke
Looking for ways to prevent "soft tissue" injuries within the hoof

Cinny is lame again. Vet came out yesterday and after flexion tests, a lot of walking and trotting in hand, nerve blocking, and x-rays it was determined that Cinny has soft tissue damage within the hoof yet again. This is the 3rd time in one year. We mostly ride in soft arena and occasionally on trail. Cinny has always been barefoot his whole life and both vet and farrier have never told me he MUST have shoes. And eve yesterday the vet didn't say anything either way, just give him another month of stall rest and see how he does. It is happening in the front feet and has happened in both, but luckily not both at once. No abscesses have ever come up, just what the vet calls a "sprain" in the foot.

Does anyone know of any way to help prevent this? Would shoes help? Pads? I'm willing to do pretty much anything to keep my sweetie from being lame and in pain every few months.

Nutrition info: He is a 900lb APHA and is a very easy keeper. He gets 2 flakes of prairie/brome mix twice a daiy and 1/2 scoop of senior for breakfast and dinner with a scoop for lunch. He is worked at least 4 days a week for 1-2 hours depending on his level of silliness and/or work ethic. We currently school Training level dressage He does not wear boot or wraps as he does not like anything on his feet.

Any advice is much appreciated.
     
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    01-17-2014, 05:01 PM
  #2
Foal
This is definetly not my area of expertise, and I don't know if it would help you because you said he doesn't like anything on his feet but perhaps some shoes would help? I'm not talking about horseshoes, I'm talking about something like this: The Easyboot Transition | EasyCare Inc.

They come in lots of different styles. I've used them and they work really well as substitutes to horseshoes with some padding too. You never know!
Give him a kiss to get better xx
loosie and KigerQueen like this.
     
    01-17-2014, 05:11 PM
  #3
Trained
Soft tissue injuries can take a long time to heal and re-injuries are common when worked too soon. He may need more than a month or brought back to work more slowly. What type of rehab work did you do after the last time it happened?
     
    01-17-2014, 06:48 PM
  #4
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaintHorseMares    
Soft tissue injuries can take a long time to heal and re-injuries are common when worked too soon. He may need more than a month or brought back to work more slowly. What type of rehab work did you do after the last time it happened?
They are actually in different feet. Last time it was his left fore and this time it's his right fore. Both times the vet said stall rest with 15 minute walks for 4 weeks and then slowly bring him back. Last time to bring back I did 1 week of basic ground work (walking on the lead, walking over ground poles, halting, backing etc). The next week I added in lunge work at walk and trot no side reins. Week after that back to full daily turnout and riding at walk/trot for 20 minutes and then after that we went back to our regular schedule.

I was pretty much planning on repeating the same process this time as it seemed to work out last time and the injury hasn't repeated in that foot.
     
    01-17-2014, 08:19 PM
  #5
Trained
Hi,

Have you got xrays? What 'soft tissue' are we talking & how was it diagnosed? Or was it just assumed after ruling out some other things? Got hoof pics to share?

While if you only ever ride on soft surfaces, hoof protection isn't generally necessary, it's obviously not the case for your boy, but I'd definitely be looking into padded boots first, over conventional rims. I wonder, if he's such an easy keeper, why the senior feed?? I'd cut that to begin with, also ensure he's got good nutrition & a good Mg supp. Without further info, my first suspicion is that he's laminitic.
     
    01-17-2014, 10:18 PM
  #6
Super Moderator
You could try a poultice for the pain issue. I use A&Js and it really works wonders. A tub will last you forever. A&J's Ice Poultice Whips and Products You can also paint ... Is it pine tar? On the bottom of the hoof to help strengthen it.

Does Cinny have shoes? You may need shoes if not. Are you positive there is no navicular issue?
     
    01-18-2014, 01:27 AM
  #7
Foal
I would also be interested in what soft tissue the vet think is affected. Elastic structures of the hoof? Sole and/or frog corium? Tendon or ligament injury?
     
    01-18-2014, 09:37 AM
  #8
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie    
Hi,

Have you got xrays? What 'soft tissue' are we talking & how was it diagnosed? Or was it just assumed after ruling out some other things? Got hoof pics to share?

While if you only ever ride on soft surfaces, hoof protection isn't generally necessary, it's obviously not the case for your boy, but I'd definitely be looking into padded boots first, over conventional rims. I wonder, if he's such an easy keeper, why the senior feed?? I'd cut that to begin with, also ensure he's got good nutrition & a good Mg supp. Without further info, my first suspicion is that he's laminitic.
Yes as I said previously, we've had he vet out and done pretty much all of the tests in the book including x-rays. Once again the vet says he sees nothing and therefore it must be a "soft tissue" injury most likely a sprain of the tendons or ligaments that are deep in the hoof area.

As for feed, this is how most horses are fed here in Nebraska...the grass hay plus something like Purina Strategy, etc. Strategy makes Cinny "hot" and with winter and the need for more fermentable fiber we have opted for Senior. I asked the vet about his weight while he was examining Cinny on Thursday and he said what I am doing is perfect and that when we start full work and showing in spring that I might think about raising his amount of Senior.

I really don't think he's laminic at all as my vet would have most likely said so as well as the farrier. Vet said Thursday everything looks perfectly healthy x-rays and all.

I just want to know how to keep him from spraining his feet LOL.
     
    01-18-2014, 10:30 AM
  #9
Trained
You say the footing is soft? How soft?

Soft footing is not a good thing. When moving around in it, the hoof should be no deeper than 1/2 buried (about 1-2 inches). Ideally the horse should move completely on top of the footing and it should flex under the horse's hoofprints and rebound. The other problem that footing can have is being too slippery and causeing strain from slipping.
I agree with loosie in that it sounds like there is more going on than just what is on the surface. Three similar injuries in a year points to a systemic issue. Either with the food he eats, the footing he is on all day/night and ridden in, how his feet are trimmed, or that he has an underlying metabolic issue.
JMO I would have another vet and farrier out to make an assessment of the situation. And you may have to consider front shoes.
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    01-18-2014, 11:25 AM
  #10
Weanling
Quote:
Does anyone know of any way to help prevent this? Would shoes help? Pads?
Soft tissue injiries within the hoof are nearly always due to internal imbakances(joint misalignment,and unbalanced coffin bone relative to the ground) along with external hoof capsule distortionsd and resulting LEVERAGE.
Therefore the prevention as well as treatment involves correctly balancing the foot from it's INTERNAL aspect. That means NOT using traditional hoof balancing techniques of sighting down the leg or from the side. That means the foot should be balanced to it's SOLE PLANE, which follows the coffin bone inside, not the leg.

Reducing leverage in all directions is also CRITICAL. Leverage stresses soft tissues. The longer the toe, or wider the footprint, the more leverage there is. So the trim or shoeing also needs to allow eased roll-over in any direction. The easier the foot can follow the leg, the less stress on the tissues inside.
Avoid plain flat shoes.
Avoid shoes fit to the end of the toe.
Use shoes that have a rolled edge all around, there are many on the market now days.

But the most important thing is the trim and using the sole plane to balance the foot. And MAPPING the foot to gt the heels trimmed correctly and to place the breakover correctly at the toe. A proper trim and shoeing should balance the bottom of the foot equally front to back around the midle of the coffin joint inside. "Traditional" trimming and shoeing does not do that in most cases.
     

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