Low, underrun heels - Page 4 - The Horse Forum
 20Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #31 of 36 Old 12-01-2013, 09:07 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 1,627
• Horses: 0
Well that horse isnt self trimming i agree with patty hes in need of a good trim. Those heels are under run on the fronts. If my horses feet looked like that after a trim, that farrier would not be coming back.

Thats the reason i fired every single farrier iv had out. For first time in 10 years my horses dont have under run heels.

I currently have two horses we are riding who are self trimming their hoofs look better then OPS horses. I got new horse 2 weeks ago a 4 year old AQHA gelding...freind gave him to me with papers.
spirit88 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #32 of 36 Old 12-02-2013, 09:55 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Colorado
Posts: 144
• Horses: 0
Pic 4 are the fronts. They were even longer before the trim and actually bending/breaking forward to a different angle and the very tips (if that makes sense?).

This farrier did say they needed more work, but didn't want to take off too much as he may get sore. I got the impression it was going to take more than one trim to get them right. He also said heels were more worn down because of the long toes as opposed to underrun?

I thought he might return sooner than 8 weeks to do some more work on them, but when I asked he said 8 weeks. What would be more reasonable, 5-6 weeks? I could call and schedule him sooner, I am sure.

I would like to give this farrier a chance as he comes recommended by my trainer and others. This horse, unfortunately, had not been on a regularly trimming schedule previously, so that didn't do him any favors.

I am in the Northwest Denver area, BTW.
5kiddos is offline  
post #33 of 36 Old 12-02-2013, 03:41 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Spring Hill Florida
Posts: 1,101
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by 5kiddos View Post
Pic 4 are the fronts. They were even longer before the trim and actually bending/breaking forward to a different angle and the very tips (if that makes sense?).

This farrier did say they needed more work, but didn't want to take off too much as he may get sore. I got the impression it was going to take more than one trim to get them right. He also said heels were more worn down because of the long toes as opposed to underrun?

I thought he might return sooner than 8 weeks to do some more work on them, but when I asked he said 8 weeks. What would be more reasonable, 5-6 weeks? I could call and schedule him sooner, I am sure.

I would like to give this farrier a chance as he comes recommended by my trainer and others. This horse, unfortunately, had not been on a regularly trimming schedule previously, so that didn't do him any favors.

I am in the Northwest Denver area, BTW.
Picture #3 looks like it has a tail hanging in it like a hind shot. Sorry if it's not!

I don't remember if you said this is a new horse to you or not. Yes the farrier is correct in not being drastic, especially on your hard ground. However, he needed to back up these run forward toes. Leaving the toes this long will only pull the heel more underrun. To give the heels a better chance of correcting themselves, the toe can be backed up, and relief given to the quarters. With this, the heels will actually speed up the correction. As far as I understand, leaving some protection is by leaving some wall and sole. Correcting a horse's angles, toes, and heels as appropriate, is putting the horse back to less strain on his feet and legs.

Last edited by princessfluffybritches; 12-02-2013 at 03:44 PM.
princessfluffybritches is offline  
post #34 of 36 Old 12-02-2013, 05:13 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 1,627
• Horses: 0
Just because he comes recommened by trainer doesnt means hes good. Just because they are certified doesnt mean their good either.
spirit88 is offline  
post #35 of 36 Old 12-02-2013, 07:42 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Colorado
Posts: 1,436
• Horses: 1
Northwest Denver is over two hours away from me, much too far to go for one trim.
But really the farrier could have done tons more there. They don't look trimmed at all.
Quote:
I would think that if my horse was in Colorado where the terrain is rocky, I'd want to leave some protection.
Not all of Colorado is rocky.... many parts are sandy, pasture grassy and soft. And if the horse is in a training and show barn the footing might be really chushy.
Patty Stiller is offline  
post #36 of 36 Old 12-04-2013, 11:27 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Colorado
Posts: 144
• Horses: 0
We are actually in a very rocky area. I'm new to Colorado, but have been told that it's called the Rocky Flats here for a reason. Very hard and rocky ground everywhere. They try and keep the arenas somewhat soft, but still a ton of rocks.

I did talk to the farrier and he is going to come at 6 weeks this time. He said he would come as close to 5-6 weeks as possible until we get him where he needs to be and find out how fast/slow his hooves grow. I will let him do the next trim and see how they look after that.

He is a new horse for me.
5kiddos is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Do you see underrun heels? Oldhorselady Hoof Care 21 10-14-2013 07:28 PM
What are underrun heels? Chickenoverlord Hoof Care 9 09-27-2013 07:56 AM
Club foot and underrun heels twogeldings Horse Health 3 01-28-2010 12:35 AM
Another hoof question Low heels/Pigeon Toes stacieandtheboys Horse Health 7 06-22-2009 06:00 PM
Low heels? cherriebark Horse Health 6 02-24-2009 11:22 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome