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Low, underrun heels

This is a discussion on Low, underrun heels within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category

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        12-01-2013, 09:07 PM
      #31
    Banned
    Well that horse isnt self trimming I agree with patty he's in need of a good trim. Those heels are under run on the fronts. If my horses feet looked like that after a trim, that farrier would not be coming back.

    That's the reason I fired every single farrier iv had out. For first time in 10 years my horses don't have under run heels.

    I currently have two horses we are riding who are self trimming their hoofs look better then OPS horses. I got new horse 2 weeks ago a 4 year old AQHA gelding...freind gave him to me with papers.
         
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        12-02-2013, 09:55 AM
      #32
    Foal
    Pic 4 are the fronts. They were even longer before the trim and actually bending/breaking forward to a different angle and the very tips (if that makes sense?).

    This farrier did say they needed more work, but didn't want to take off too much as he may get sore. I got the impression it was going to take more than one trim to get them right. He also said heels were more worn down because of the long toes as opposed to underrun?

    I thought he might return sooner than 8 weeks to do some more work on them, but when I asked he said 8 weeks. What would be more reasonable, 5-6 weeks? I could call and schedule him sooner, I am sure.

    I would like to give this farrier a chance as he comes recommended by my trainer and others. This horse, unfortunately, had not been on a regularly trimming schedule previously, so that didn't do him any favors.

    I am in the Northwest Denver area, BTW.
         
        12-02-2013, 03:41 PM
      #33
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by 5kiddos    
    Pic 4 are the fronts. They were even longer before the trim and actually bending/breaking forward to a different angle and the very tips (if that makes sense?).

    This farrier did say they needed more work, but didn't want to take off too much as he may get sore. I got the impression it was going to take more than one trim to get them right. He also said heels were more worn down because of the long toes as opposed to underrun?

    I thought he might return sooner than 8 weeks to do some more work on them, but when I asked he said 8 weeks. What would be more reasonable, 5-6 weeks? I could call and schedule him sooner, I am sure.

    I would like to give this farrier a chance as he comes recommended by my trainer and others. This horse, unfortunately, had not been on a regularly trimming schedule previously, so that didn't do him any favors.

    I am in the Northwest Denver area, BTW.
    Picture #3 looks like it has a tail hanging in it like a hind shot. Sorry if it's not!

    I don't remember if you said this is a new horse to you or not. Yes the farrier is correct in not being drastic, especially on your hard ground. However, he needed to back up these run forward toes. Leaving the toes this long will only pull the heel more underrun. To give the heels a better chance of correcting themselves, the toe can be backed up, and relief given to the quarters. With this, the heels will actually speed up the correction. As far as I understand, leaving some protection is by leaving some wall and sole. Correcting a horse's angles, toes, and heels as appropriate, is putting the horse back to less strain on his feet and legs.
         
        12-02-2013, 05:13 PM
      #34
    Banned
    Just because he comes recommened by trainer doesnt means he's good. Just because they are certified doesnt mean their good either.
         
        12-02-2013, 07:42 PM
      #35
    Weanling
    Northwest Denver is over two hours away from me, much too far to go for one trim.
    But really the farrier could have done tons more there. They don't look trimmed at all.
    Quote:
    I would think that if my horse was in Colorado where the terrain is rocky, I'd want to leave some protection.
    Not all of Colorado is rocky.... many parts are sandy, pasture grassy and soft. And if the horse is in a training and show barn the footing might be really chushy.
         
        12-04-2013, 11:27 AM
      #36
    Foal
    We are actually in a very rocky area. I'm new to Colorado, but have been told that it's called the Rocky Flats here for a reason. Very hard and rocky ground everywhere. They try and keep the arenas somewhat soft, but still a ton of rocks.

    I did talk to the farrier and he is going to come at 6 weeks this time. He said he would come as close to 5-6 weeks as possible until we get him where he needs to be and find out how fast/slow his hooves grow. I will let him do the next trim and see how they look after that.

    He is a new horse for me.
         

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