Majors latest hoof trim...what do you guys think? - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
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post #21 of 65 Old 05-21-2010, 01:02 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks Kevin. I am definitely getting a new farrier. I am glad to know I can ride him a little. He is a trail horse, so it doesn't do him any favors to let him stand around. He is used to working hard and he likes it.
Thanks for the link AlmostThere, I definitely need to learn the difference between a good trim and a bad one.
I sure am hoping that you guys will be willing to evaluate his new trim when I get it though. It will have to be trial and error. I want him to have a good trim all the way around and good front shoes that stay on.
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post #22 of 65 Old 05-21-2010, 01:24 AM
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You know that by just putting front shoes on you are encouraging him to be heavy on the forehand and not use his hind end.

There's nothing like the Rockies in the springtime... Nothing like the freedom in the air... And there ain't nothing better than draggin calves to the fire and there's nothing like the smell of burning hair. -Brenn Hill
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post #23 of 65 Old 05-21-2010, 01:34 AM Thread Starter
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no Kevin, I didn't know that. He is kind of heavy on the forehand . I didn't know that was why. A lot of time in the arena he is tripping all over the place and I think it is because he is heavy on his forehand, especially there where it is all level. He has never been shod on the backs...any suggestions on how I might prepare him for that. When I say never, I don't mean since I've had him, I mean never in his life.

I'm asking because I don't think he can go completely barefoot. I live in NC and in our area it is either rocky or hard clay. I think he really needs his shoes. So I'm thinking all four shoes.

Last edited by sandy2u1; 05-21-2010 at 01:38 AM.
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post #24 of 65 Old 05-21-2010, 03:10 AM
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I don't mean to offend, but it sounds like that farrier was ripping you off.

As far as preparing to have back shoes put on, pick the feet every day (twice is better) and tap them. Start by using your hand, then maybe the back of a brush. Get him used to holding those feet up for fairly long periods of time. The important thing is to get him to the point where he can relax for the farrier. When you get a good farrier, you sure want to avoid getting him hurt =).

I had a farrier that tried to put shoes on one of my horses while his foot was too long, and I told him to pack up and leave. I found a great farrier through my trainer, though. He charges more than anyone else around here, but he is sooooooooo worth it. He really knows hooves, he listens to any concerns I have, he calls to confirm appointments and shows up when he says he will, and he remembers all my horses and any issues they have. He also teaches me a little something every time he is here, and I know that if I have an issue, I can call him.

Your horse will be okay, but it might take a couple sessions with a GOOD farrier to get him where he needs to be, because those are some long feet.

I wish you and Major well, and I hope your friend's horse does well, too.

Learning never stops
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post #25 of 65 Old 05-21-2010, 10:32 AM
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Originally Posted by sandy2u1 View Post
no Kevin, I didn't know that. He is kind of heavy on the forehand . I didn't know that was why. A lot of time in the arena he is tripping all over the place and I think it is because he is heavy on his forehand, especially there where it is all level. He has never been shod on the backs...any suggestions on how I might prepare him for that. When I say never, I don't mean since I've had him, I mean never in his life.

I'm asking because I don't think he can go completely barefoot. I live in NC and in our area it is either rocky or hard clay. I think he really needs his shoes. So I'm thinking all four shoes.

If his hind feet get a little sore he will naturally shift his wieght to the front feet. I know some reining horse trainer that will pull the front shoes if a horse is having a hard time getting back on their hindquarters. If he is good to have them trimmed he should be fine with getting shoes on them.

There's nothing like the Rockies in the springtime... Nothing like the freedom in the air... And there ain't nothing better than draggin calves to the fire and there's nothing like the smell of burning hair. -Brenn Hill
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post #26 of 65 Old 05-21-2010, 11:52 AM Thread Starter
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aforred- No offense taken. Everyone pretty much agrees with you. Thanks for the shoeing tips. Thanks for the well wishes, also.
kevin- Thanks. I'm sure that is what is going on with him, especially since he isn't always like that. I'm definitely going to try him with four shoes on and see how he does. Thanks for pointing that out to me.
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post #27 of 65 Old 05-21-2010, 07:19 PM
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I would definately agree get a new farrier.
You already got some really good advice.
Hope everything works out for you.
I don't understand why he would not pick the hind feet up and check them out atleast and clean them up even if he thinks they don't need to be trimmed.
Thats shows respect for the customer to pick em up and clean them out and make sure the hoof is ok.
A lot of times the hooves really need to be rasped around the edges so they don't start cracks and the frog trim lightly so no crap or mud hangs up in unwanted places.

anvil
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post #28 of 65 Old 05-21-2010, 09:33 PM
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Lacks support and not centered around coffin joint.

Hi Sandy,

It is hard to believe that your horse has only just been shod. Long story short the job falls short in so many areas. First of all he has not been given adequate support under the fetlock joint probably making the horse lean forward or change stance often to bring the fetlock over the base of support.
The break over is also too far forward when compared to the base of support.
Ideally the ground bearing surface of the shoe should be at equal distances around the coffin joint normally found at the widest part of the hoof capsule.

Shoeing him this way should enable him to load the heels correctly.

Please be careful about just trimming the heels for the sake of it. The heels should be trimmed to provide maximum support not necessarily for the heel height.

Regards

Richard
Australian Farrier
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post #29 of 65 Old 05-21-2010, 11:34 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks everyone. I had a farrier come out today to look at him. He said that they need to grow out again in order for him to fix them. I said "You don't think his toes are to long" and he told me yes, but that they need to grow out again and then he will fix them. Does this sound right to you guys or do I need to keep looking? He did measure them and scrape his frogs (which my last farrier never did. He seems to be calm and good with horses and he takes a few minutes just to pet them and get them comfortable with him, which to me is good. The most important thing though is how good a job he does on the feet and I won't be able to judge that for a few weeks.
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post #30 of 65 Old 05-21-2010, 11:46 PM Thread Starter
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I don't understand why he would not pick the hind feet up and check them out atleast and clean them up even if he thinks they don't need to be trimmed.

I wondered that, too. The first time he didn't touch his back feet I didn't think to much of it. The second time I did get a little worried, because it has been twelve weeks at that point since they have been touched. I guess that should have been a big red flag, but I trusted that he knew what he was doing.

Quote:
It is hard to believe that your horse has only just been shod. Long story short the job falls short in so many areas. First of all he has not been given adequate support under the fetlock joint probably making the horse lean forward or change stance often to bring the fetlock over the base of support.
The break over is also too far forward when compared to the base of support.
Ideally the ground bearing surface of the shoe should be at equal distances around the coffin joint normally found at the widest part of the hoof capsule.

Shoeing him this way should enable him to load the heels correctly.

Please be careful about just trimming the heels for the sake of it. The heels should be trimmed to provide maximum support not necessarily for the heel height.


Thanks Ausfarrier. I will make note of your post so that I can talk it over with the new farrier when I find one. I sure hope all of you guys will be able to look over his new feet when he gets them.


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