My adventures with Thoro'bred Sticky Shoes
   

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health > Hoof Care

My adventures with Thoro'bred Sticky Shoes

This is a discussion on My adventures with Thoro'bred Sticky Shoes within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Thorob red race sticky shoe
  • Should a shoe be reset if clinches are popping up

Like Tree15Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    03-26-2014, 01:55 PM
  #1
Foal
My adventures with Thoro'bred Sticky Shoes

I wanted to document this for anyone else interested in these shoes. I couldnt find any customer reviews or photos so i'm making my own. This way other folks who are interested in them will learn from my experience.


I am a big supporter of barefoot horses but not all situations make barefoot the best situation. My goal for one of my mare's is to eventually have her barefoot. Current she is in shoes in front, bare in hind.

So I've had her for a little over a year and she is finally starting to have more normal looking hooves. I decided to put shoes on her when I first got her to give her broken abscessy feet some support.

I'm now at a point were I want to try changing things up. She recently has been cracking under the clinches all the way down to the ground. I do not want to pull her off shoes with her feet in this condition, it's just asking for them to really break, and I want her ridable. I also want her hooves to be healthier, and think barefoot would do that for her. Since she isnt quite ready for barefoot, something else is called for.

Easycare, which makes hoof boots came out with the Easy Shoes (4 different ones) that glue or nail on. That said, they are pretty amazing. People are getting great results from this flexible plastic/rubber shoe.

In my research on them I came across another glue on shoe; Thoro'bred Sticky Shoes. They come in a kit that provides you with everything you(the farrier) need to put them on. I looked into getting both the easy shoe and the sticky shoe. (https://www.thorobredinc.com/sticky-shoe-kits/)

The easy shoe would be my top choice but they are still expensive for my green horse who isnt even showing yet. If I had her as a performance horse and shows every weekend I'd be much more inclined to get them. I believe they were $40-something for a pair plus shipping. Add the farrier's fee plus cost of glue to put them on and you are looking at over $100. They also glue up on the sides of the hoof and require cutting to remove them and extra prep to get the hoof ready for install. Despite this, still pretty awesome to have a shoe that flexes as the horse moves. (EasyShoe | EasyCare Inc.)

The sticky shoes come in several different types, some with toe clips. They are normal aluminum shoes (so very light weight) with a rubber neoprene bonded to the top of the shoe. The neoprene is supposed to be their "leg saving" technology. The shoe is advertised towards tender footed, thin soled horses or those who want less nail holes (me!). They've been using these shoes on racehorses.

They are sold in kits. Each kit includes a pair of shoes, 2 pair of latex gloves, a bottle of glue, and instructions on how to put the shoes on. The website also has a video you can order to watch a farrier put these shoes on. This kit depending on type and size of shoes will cost you between $31 and $37 plus shipping.

The shoe is glued on the hoof only at the bottom, no glue along the sides. 1 nail is added to each side of the shoe at the widest part of the hoof as "insurance" that the shoe stays on 6-8 weeks. When its time to take them off, they pull off just like any other regular nonglued shoe. Prep for this shoe is the same as a regular shoe minus you let the wall be as wide as the shoe for where the glue is going. The hoof also needs to be flat on the surface where the shoe is going, the glue does not fill in any gaps like most hoof glues. The glue drys within 2 mins.

I have ordered just such a sticky shoe kit after emailing with the president and the farrier from Thoro'bred brand (they also make regular shoes). I asked questions, like which shoes should I get for what i'm doing and the terrian I ride on, how do you take off the shoes, if they can be reused, if the glue can be reused or bought separate, etc. They were very willing to answer questions and help in whatever way they could. Once my farrier and I felt that we had enough knowledge we agreed to try these shoes on. If they don't work for my horse then they don't work, but if they do, i'm very excited by the idea of only 2 holes in my horse's hoof than 8 and the benefits of the padding on the shoe.

My farrier appointment is in 2 days and as long as I ordered the correct size shoe things should be put into play.

This is what we started with:


Dealt with lots of abscesses blowing out in the beginning. Amazingly she was never lame:


The Sticky Shoe Kit:




The shoes







The glue



The instructions





They also sent a computer disc and I ordered the video to watch. The video was not as put together as I would have liked but it did give yu a visual of the shoes going on and 7 weeks later coming off. Helpful tips from the video are to drill out the nail holes thru the neoprene first and to round off any edges on the shoe that may catch. Also, wear your gloves when using the glue, this glue is like super glue and wont come off of things it makes contact with like your clothes or your skin.
Roux likes this.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    03-26-2014, 05:54 PM
  #2
Weanling
Interesting! Let us know how you get on

I remember doing a debate on barefoot vs. shoeing (I was on the shoeing side) and reading up on this "imprint" shoeing? It was designed for laminitic horses, and they're just made out of plastic that you can reshape when it's been heated in hot water, glue onto the foot, then fix the shape with a "freezing spray".

loosie, KigerQueen and Roux like this.
     
    03-26-2014, 09:46 PM
  #3
Yearling
Thanks in advance, this should be interesting.
     
    03-27-2014, 01:09 AM
  #4
Yearling
Super interesting! I can't believe your "before" pics!
Subbing to see what happens. I haven't heard of a lot of success with glues mostly because the shoes fall off... but I have NO first hand experience.

This popped up in my head and I don't mean anything by it but... If I remember correctly the race horse "Big Brown" transitioned from traditional aluminum racing shoes to a glue on before the Belmont and then promptly finished last.
     
    03-27-2014, 07:29 AM
  #5
Trained
Hi, Sounds/looks like some problem hooves you're dealing with there! Interesting seeing different ideas out there. Be interested to see recent pics, to compare with what you started with & interested to hear/see how they go.

Those shoes don't really look any different to conventional shoes to me(??), barring the neoprene, which I'm afraid I can't really see the benefit in. You can glue on regular shoes & other plastics, Glove & Renegade shells, and you can also nail on the easyshoes. Have you considered hoof boots too? They're my general choice for hoof protection, if appropriate.

Quote:
I am a big supporter of barefoot horses but not all situations make barefoot the best situation.
Absolutely. Barefoot is by no means necessarily best IMO. Whether it be due to 'sick' hooves, diet, environment, the work we want the horse to do... horses very frequently need protection/support to do well, and IMO sometimes that may be conventional rims.

I think that especially in the case of sick feet, especially given the range of alternatives these days, conventional rims are not generally the best choice though. Biggest problems IMO are peripheral loading - overloading walls, which may already be greatly compromised, without support underneath the hoof - and lack of protection underneath the foot. Of course, those can be largely alleviated by appropriate padding underneath, or only working the horse on yielding surfaces.

Quote:
She recently has been cracking under the clinches all the way down to the ground. I do not want to pull her off shoes with her feet in this condition, it's just asking for them to really break, and I want her ridable.
Yes, especially if her feet are still anything like when you got her, there is also likely infection present, weakening walls. Be interested to know how your farrier has dealt with it, considering how badly shod it appears she was in that pic when you got her(bearing in mind don't know what that farrier started with or how old the shoe job), the wall is quite flared & unhealthy, heels appear quite high.

If you just pulled the shoes & made her go bare on everything, some wall would probably indeed break away, but that's not necessarily a bad thing, considering the excess & imbalance in the pic. Keeping her well trimmed should largely alleviate that issue though. But yes, she also would likely be uncomfortable, or incapable without risking further injury, to be worked on any surface either.

Quote:
The easy shoe would be my top choice but they are still expensive for my green horse who isnt even showing yet.
But being rubber, they don't wear anything like as much as metal, so can generally be reset many times.

Quote:
The neoprene is supposed to be their "leg saving" technology. The shoe is advertised towards tender footed, thin soled horses or those who want less nail holes (me!).
Even peripherally loaded(sole/frog unloaded) bare or booted horses on hard surfaces can suffer from concussion damage, both in the hoof & up the legs, etc. Because there is no real shock absorbing capacity to the walls, except insofar as the walls will distort under undue stress. Peripheral loading without frog/sole support/protection doesn't help soles to become healthy & thick, rather the contrary, nor I believe, aid with 'tenderness' except in a purely palliative sense. Without pads, rim shoes also provide no protection to thin soles or weak frogs, so potential for stone bruise abscesses are also a concern.

Quote:
The glue...
The instructions
Does it sound like the glue is better than the Vettec stuff? Interested to hear about that & if your farrier's had any experience with Vettec, for comparison.

The instruction I'd question there is in rasping the hoof flat for the entire width of the shoe. That could be OK, but in the case of thin walls, distorted hooves, the potential for having to rasp into thin sole to accomplish this & retain good balance could be a big issue & if the shoe sits flush against the sole, there's also the potential for constant pressure to do damage there.

So anyway, hope my thoughts help your assessment & be interested to see how they go.
Clava, KigerQueen and Roux like this.
     
    03-27-2014, 07:35 AM
  #6
Trained
Subbing to hear more!
     
    03-27-2014, 09:09 AM
  #7
Foal
Subbing
     
    03-27-2014, 09:23 AM
  #8
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by IndiesaurusRex    

That's one I havent heard of. It looks alot like the easy shoes

Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie    
Those shoes don't really look any different to conventional shoes to me

Have you considered hoof boots too? They're my general choice for hoof protection, if appropriate.

The wall is quite flared & unhealthy, heels appear quite high.

But being rubber, they don't wear anything like as much as metal, so can generally be reset many times.

Does it sound like the glue is better than the Vettec stuff? Interested to hear about that & if your farrier's had any experience with Vettec, for comparison.

The instruction I'd question there is in rasping the hoof flat for the entire width of the shoe.
Yes, the shoe is a conventional aluminum shoe, just with the neoprene added to it.

Hoof boots and me are great pals. Between my mother and me we have 9 horses, 7 which are used for riding lessons. My mare is the only one with shoes, all the others work in hoof boots. Depending on who is being worked in what way, we have easy boots originals, epics, trail, old macs, and cavallo simple boots. I'm actually in the process of ordering the new easyboot back country for when we do trail rides, for my mare's hind feet. She tends to overreach and think they will best boot to keep the smacking of her sole from being worst. Once we get to a point that I have her bare then she'd get ridden in hoof boots. She actually has a pair of purple cavallo boots for her front that I put on over the shoes when we have snow to prevent snow balls. :)

Her heel on her left foot is high. That foot is a club foot. The toe hardly grows in comparison to the heel. Her right front foot has the opposite problem in that the toe grows much faster than the heel. I have her reshod every 5.5-6 weeks and normally by 5 weeks she moves noticeably uneven when I ride. The second picture is from summer of last year, right before getting reshod. I have been taking photos every time I have her redone so we can keep track of the progress. She also moves her left leg not straight forward and back; it has a swivel to it with pressure coming down on the outside (left side)of the hoof first when she sets it down. So it's a battle of fixing 1 underrun heel in a way that she doesnt rip off that shoe and trying to get her off the heel with the other. So we maintain it best we can.

The easyshoes unfortunately are not reuseable if you glue. They glue the sides to the hoof wall and that has to be cut off, which means you don't have a way to reattach. :/

When emailing with the Thoro'bred people I asked about the glue. My mare tends to pull off shoes. She overreaches and will catch them on the side as she turns (normally when she is playing out the pasture during a bucking spree etc). I noticed that you cannot buy the glue separate and I wanted to know if you can reuse the glue once its opened or if it all sets up and has to be trashed. They do not want people experimenting with their glue and then blaming their company for it not working how the people want. So they only sell it with the kit for now. They described the glue being like super glue. It doesnt fill in any spaces, just makes the flat surfaces stick together. They say you have to fill in any gaps with some sort of acrylic before applying the shoe. They also said that the glue would be useable if my mare pulls off her shoe but after being opened it weakens. So it would be okay to use to reapply until I got the next kit. Then i'd want to throw the old bottle out and keep the newest bottle. It also drys really fast. It is stuck to the hoof by 10seconds and sets within 2 mins. Higher humidity makes it set faster. They suggest not using anything product on the hoof that would take moisture away from where the shoe is going like alcohol simply because the shoe will stick better.

In the past we had to glue on shoes before. It had canvas up the sides and we used it on a horse that had a abscess blow out where his clinches needed to be. I believe that farrier used Adhere on those shoes. I recall it being time consuming and messy. As far as the farrier i'm using now, he isn't a huge fan of glue ons but he hasnt worked with this kind before, only the kind with the cup that goes all the way up the wall. He is willing to try this kind with me but we both go into it knowing that it may not work as well as we hope. I'll ask him about his glue on experiences.

The rasping the hoof flat where the shoe goes is so there is more surface for the shoe to adhere to with the glue. More adhension, the longer the shoe stays on. It also keeps debris from getting under the shoe. The shoe is a normal size shoe so its not like the sole is going to be flat, you just don't par out to the whiteline area as much. In the video it brought up what to do with thin walled horses where you cannot do that. It said to do the best that you can with what you have to work with. If there is concern that there is not enough glued surface that addition nails can be added (so 2 nails on each side instead of 1). The design wont work for every horse.
     
    03-28-2014, 07:04 PM
  #9
Foal
Well things went okay getting the shoes on. They are a tad shorter at the ends than the shoes i've been using despite being the same size so the farrier had to keep playing with them to get them to fit. It took longer to get the shoes the correct shape than to put them on her hooves. The glue also took about 5 mins to cure instead of 1-2mins but it is also 50degrees out here and trying to rain. The video said the glue cures best at 75 degrees.

I brought her down to the barn about 2 hours before her appt time,brushed her, picked and then hosed her hooves to get all excess dirt off from around the shoes. I then towel dried the hooves followed with our blower got all water out of the cracks. She then got to hang out in a stall to let the sawdust dry any extra moisture while we waited for the farrier.

He pulled her old shoes and trimmed her feet.
Then he shaped the shoe.
We placed the shoes unattached where they would be when mounted and got the toe clips bent almost all the way over to the hoof wall so that way when he went to mount the shoe with glue it should slide exactly into place.

When the shoes were ready he put on the gloves, applied the glue, attached the shoe to the foot, we counted to ten with him pressing the shoe to the hoof, we then worked together so that he gently set the foot down so the shoe wouldnt slide while I picked up the opposite leg. He then did the same thing with the other front leg.

When he put that one down and we saw the glue was still sticky on the first foot, he tapped in the clips the rest of the way, and worked on the back so she would be standing with her weight on the front.

When he was done trimming her back hooves up, he came back and put in the 2 nails to each shoe. He punched holes in the neoprene before he put the shoe on and the nails seemed to go in smoothly.

I let her stand and munch on hay for about 30mins to make sure things were set and dry (I could touch it and it felt dry but I just wanted to make sure because im a paranoid momma). I then took her up to the ring and led her around at a walk and then a trot. She certainly moves different. Less action up, more action forward. It took her 2 laps around the ring before she moved more normal. I think most of it was the lightweight aluminum that she wasn't used too, not necessarily the pad. I really want to ride her but she was acting like her stifle is uncomfortable so I want to give her a day and make sure she is feeling 100%.

I did ask my farrier what he thought of the glue in comparison to what he has used before. He didnt find much a difference in ease of use and we will just have to wait and see if the glue holds on how good it lasts.

Sizing the shoe to the hoof


Gluing then happened

Nailing the shoe on after gluing


Glued on
     
    03-28-2014, 07:20 PM
  #10
Foal
Vid of the actually act of gluing
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CH6J...ature=youtu.be
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Severe hoof sensitivity. Shoes or no shoes? libbysmallbone Hoof Care 11 08-25-2012 11:43 AM
Farrier was out today - reset some shoes, set new shoes - thoughts? crimsonsky Hoof Care 8 05-14-2012 11:40 PM
Front shoes and Back Shoes???? RhondaLynn Hoof Care 18 04-19-2012 11:04 AM
Get some bling on them shoes! *Buying a new pair of horse shoes.* myhorsesonador Horse Tack and Equipment 7 02-14-2011 01:25 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:15 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0