My gelding's hooves. Navicular? Founder? Thrush...LONG story - Page 2
   

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My gelding's hooves. Navicular? Founder? Thrush...LONG story

This is a discussion on My gelding's hooves. Navicular? Founder? Thrush...LONG story within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Navicular and founder
  • Navicular horse + nsc

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    06-24-2013, 08:07 PM
  #11
Trained
Princess-re read the original post. It states right there it was KNOWN prior to purchase.

Navicular can be managed for along time, as far as I know. I had one years ago that had it, and ended up selling him for a WP horse, not more jumping, and he was fine for years for them. It really would be nice if you could get the old films for comparison.....People can be so ridiculous sometimes. You are just trying to do what is best for the horse and need a baseline. UGH.
     
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    06-24-2013, 08:09 PM
  #12
Green Broke
I definitely second those X-rays. Get em done! And then I'd be on the phone cursing out that SOB who sold you this horse for not giving you the records. Seems real fishy to me. But, it is what it is and id have your own X-rays done so you can figure it out and if your horse needs any meds or special shoes you can get to it asap
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    06-24-2013, 09:48 PM
  #13
Yearling
X rays. Does this horse have sidebone also? Looks like it. Trim could be a bit better but from just coming out of shoes, its ok.
     
    06-25-2013, 09:39 AM
  #14
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by franknbeans    
Princess-re read the original post. It states right there it was KNOWN prior to purchase.

Navicular can be managed for along time, as far as I know. I had one years ago that had it, and ended up selling him for a WP horse, not more jumping, and he was fine for years for them. It really would be nice if you could get the old films for comparison.....People can be so ridiculous sometimes. You are just trying to do what is best for the horse and need a baseline. UGH.
Frank, I've reread it many times. She was mislead, and they won't show her the xrays. She was lead to believe that the horse was fine, MOL, maybe had a problem a while ago. And if the previous owner was being honest, she would have gladly showed her the xray. My opinion, anyway.

Yes Navicular can be well maintained-most times. My first horse had been maintained well for years. And if I had sold him, I would have told the person about the maintenance and how it may limit some forms of riding. Or sold him as a pasture mate.
     
    06-25-2013, 12:44 PM
  #15
Trained
Princess-here is the text of the OP. Perhaps you missed the bolded part, but that sure tells me that the seller AND the buyer knew there was a navicular issue PRIOR to purchase.
I got my horse 2 months ago. Before we got him, he was said to have navicular, and by navicular, I mean he got overweight (no exercise and was fed too much grain), became a bit lame, and then a single xray showed slight signs of navicular change (or so i'm told - the previous owner is "debating" on whether or not she wants me to see the xrays) - so they immediately put wedge shoes on and never did anything else about it, just left wedge shoes on for years. He also had neglected teeth and after I got those fixed, he gained a lot of weight and started limping again. I had a farrier come out, take the wedge shoes off, give him a trim, and I cut back on the grain. He has slimmed down some and his limping is almost gone. He is still very careful on pavement and is also recovering from thrush (WEEKS of rain did a number on him). Also, he went from no supplements to some hoof supplement. I am going to get a new set of xrays done and am hoping to get the old ones to compare. But for now, I was wondering what you all thought of these pictures? This is 2 weeks after his trim and shoe removal. The soles are flaking, but is that just shedding the weakened hoof?


Now, the OP had the option of getting a PPE with films done herself, but apparently she opted to take her chances. Yeah, it would be nice for the owner to release the films, since they would be a nice baseline, but since they were YEARS ago, I say bad on the OP for not doing a thorough PPE.
     
    06-25-2013, 12:53 PM
  #16
Weanling
Princess, honestly, she was probably lucky the previous owner told her about the navicular at all. I'm tossing in another vote for X-rays, because I don't see anything glaringly wrong with those hooves. They're not perfect, but I don't see a terrible contracted, underrun heel and long toe like many navicular horses have. He looks a little long (from the bottom pics only) and unbalanced all around, but nothing awful. I wish the hoof had a mustang roll, just because he looks like he'll crack the hoof around the shoe nails, but I think I've just been doing the barefoot thing for too long. I don't see much to indicate laminitis/founder either, so you really have to see what's going on inside to know what to do. There are still some treatment options for this guy if you're willing to spend the money-- all the standard arthritis stuff like injecting the joint, special barefoot trimming or specialized shoeing based on radiographs, the tildren shot, etc. You could also cut your losses and give him away as a pasture companion or retire him yourself and get a more sound riding horse. I think he sounds treatable at this point, but only you and your vet really have the whole picture. And maybe he just has thrush and an abscess from a sudden change in shoeing/trimming. He might come out of some of it after a few months without shoes. Who knows? Get those X-rays though.
     
    06-25-2013, 01:02 PM
  #17
Weanling
I am a little curious how lame he is and how long ago it started rereading the grain/weight connection. I just don't see the bands, the high heels, and the laminar separation I would expect with laminits, but my gut instinct would be to put him on a low NSC diet as if he were laminitic and see if the lameness resolves. It might help even if laminitis isn't the cause if there is some metabolic link. I would still get X-rays to make sure I wasn't missing something. But again, I think all horses benefit from low NSC diets, just like I think nearly every horse benefits from barefoot trimming, but I want to be careful not to be pushy. There's more than one correct way to keep a horse.
     
    06-25-2013, 01:16 PM
  #18
Foal
Thank you everyone for your replies! It is comforting to know there isn't something obviously wrong with what is in the pictures. To clarify, I KNEW he has been considered navicular about 2 years ago. We considered getting our own xrays before buying him, but it wouldn't have really made a difference. He has qualities that are perfect for my family right now. I bought him fully expecting to keep the wedge shoes on forever, but when he gained weight and became lame again even with the shoes on, we decided to try a different route. I am actually waiting for the vet to call me back so we can get new xrays. I am hoping comparing them to old xrays is not detrimental to figuring out what is wrong, because it looks like the previous owner is not giving me them to me.
     
    06-25-2013, 01:17 PM
  #19
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Viranh    
I am a little curious how lame he is and how long ago it started rereading the grain/weight connection. I just don't see the bands, the high heels, and the laminar separation I would expect with laminits, but my gut instinct would be to put him on a low NSC diet as if he were laminitic and see if the lameness resolves. It might help even if laminitis isn't the cause if there is some metabolic link. I would still get X-rays to make sure I wasn't missing something. But again, I think all horses benefit from low NSC diets, just like I think nearly every horse benefits from barefoot trimming, but I want to be careful not to be pushy. There's more than one correct way to keep a horse.
He is barely lame at all. He limps on his first step onto pavement and his first step into a trot.
     
    06-25-2013, 02:05 PM
  #20
Weanling
What's his diet like? How much turnout, what kind of hay, hard feeds? Also, do his hooves feel hot to the touch? Can you check his digital pulse? That might help determine if he could be having mild/early laminitis. That could explain his discomfort in wedged shoes. It does not rule out extra weight/inflammation/etc aggravating his navicular though.
     

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