Navicular disease
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health > Hoof Care

Navicular disease

This is a discussion on Navicular disease within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Navicular disease pictures
  • Is lungeing bad for a navicular horse

Like Tree5Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    05-06-2013, 09:16 AM
  #1
Foal
Navicular disease

I have a Quater horse Paint 17hands 1200 lbs and he is 12. I found out that a year ago he has Navicular. He has been lame the last few times I have ridden him and he has been on bute. My riding teacher says it's because he is not getting shod correctly but, then again her boyfriend is a blacksmith. She said he is having to much pressure in his heels in his front. I really do not know what to do. I am going to talk to my Farrier and see what we can do different. Should I use a Farrier that treats Navicular Disease? What should I do???
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    05-06-2013, 09:48 AM
  #2
Green Broke
My dad's mare has medium grade navicular.
The aim of our game is to get as much weight off the 'toe' as possible. I don't know many english words for what I am going to describe, to please bear with me!

Initially we shod her with O type shoes on the front; the farrier made these and she was done every 6 weeks without fail. A week over say in winter when the hooves don't grow so fast, was really bad for her.

We then changed her training programme, and improved my dad's riding with many lessons and coming from behind more than working on the front REALLY improved things. Until it got to the point where she was coming so far from behind she kept catching and taking the O shoes off.

So we tried normal you shaped shoes for a while. It was working, until we were free lunging her outside. Some FOOL had left the tiny side gate open which you are always instructed to close as unless you open and close it yourself, you can't see it. Unfortunately, Josie did and cantered off across the yard.

She was not so much lame, but short then on her left fore. A month later, we Xrayed after injecting the hoof area and sending it to sleep (she then had no lameness on the lunge so knew it was navicular). She had an inflamation and another hole.

She's just had a very expensive series of newish injections which are supposed to help fill these tiny holes.

Best advice would be get recent updated xrays so you know how far along it is 12 months later, get a GOOD vet who specialises in this sort of thing, and a very, very good farrier. They need to sit down with you and discuss best shoeing plan.
     
    05-06-2013, 10:52 AM
  #3
Trained
Corrective shoeing can make big improvements on a navicular horse. I had a mare for many years that was diagnosed with it. She never took a lame step with her corrective shoeing, she wore egg bars and pads and my farrier was very good at working with navicular horses. I showed this mare quite heavily and she was never lame. I gave her away when she was 17 to someone who tried several farriers and she went dead lame again to the point she was put down. So with an equine vet knowledgeable in the condition and a farrier who knows how to correct it, I believe most horses can be sound.
WildAcreFarms likes this.
     
    05-06-2013, 12:24 PM
  #4
Super Moderator
There are so many ways to handle this and to continue enjoying your horse, while keeping him sound over many years.

A wedge shoe is very helpful as the above poster stated, you want to shorten the toe and raise the heal to get the weight off. A barefoot shoer will have their own opinion on this but I prefer this method.

The next thing you'll want to do is look into something like Smartsox (which is a suplement to get the blood flowing in the hoof) or talk to your vet about isosoxuprine. That can be used several different ways but I would use that as a last resort (my opinino).

There is a new shot out there which is probably the one that Duffy is talking about that is rather magical. It's called Tildren. It available in Europe and has been used for quite some time on horses and humans for osteoperosis. It is not FDA approved however your vet can write a letter and send x-rays to get permission to give the shot. It's worth the money but you are looking at around $1200.

You can also look into the Magnetic Hoof boots and using joint supplements such as Adequan.

Your farrier will be key though....

Good luck!
     
    05-06-2013, 08:49 PM
  #5
Weanling
I have a big Warmblood that has been off and on lame for a year. We've been through 5 farriers and 4 vets. I have come to the realization that proper shoeing with pads is essential to my guy being sound. He's on joint supplements can't say it helps or not to be honest. BUT what I know 100% is that if he is shod or trimmed a little off he's out for the next 6 weeks until his next shoeing and barefoot (which I'm totally for) thus far has not been an option with this guy.

You'd think you can find a great farrier and be good to go but my experience is that is not always the case. I have found good farriers that can shoe him sound but if I'm not right there they get in a hurry ( I assume) and next thing you know he has been trimmed clubby and were back to square one. I'm taking my guy down to the college for injections to the coffin joint and the bursa wednesday and if that does not work we are looking at Nerving him later this month. Even with that he will need proper shoes and pads for life. I"m very sad about this and think if I could find a great natural trimmer I could possible work him into barefoot but thus far this person has eluded me :(
Good luck and as many have said a GREAT farrier is the key!! I hope you are able to find one.
     
    05-06-2013, 08:53 PM
  #6
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by waresbear    
Corrective shoeing can make big improvements on a navicular horse. I had a mare for many years that was diagnosed with it. She never took a lame step with her corrective shoeing, she wore egg bars and pads and my farrier was very good at working with navicular horses. I showed this mare quite heavily and she was never lame. I gave her away when she was 17 to someone who tried several farriers and she went dead lame again to the point she was put down. So with an equine vet knowledgeable in the condition and a farrier who knows how to correct it, I believe most horses can be sound.
Such a shame but alas all too common.

The vets will tell clients that it is progressive and many will encourage putting the horses down.

I think the right farrier makes ALL the difference!!
     
    05-06-2013, 08:58 PM
  #7
Trained
It was a shame, the mare was getting older and no so mareish, so she would have made a child a nice safe mount. In all fairness, I know her new owners did try to get my farrier to travel the 2 hours to work on her or they offered to travel to him, he just wasn't taking new clients, at all but he did give them recommendations for farriers in their area, they tried all 3 he referred, she never became sound again, so who knows?
     
    05-06-2013, 10:35 PM
  #8
Weanling
I know I've had my guy sound when the farrier pays attention and then same farrier does a not so perfect job ( I wasn't standing over him which seems kind of rude to do) and boom the horse is not sound. I hate to be a nitpicker but having had this big guy for several years I know what kind of shoes make him sound and anything less than perfect angles and perfect pads and he's head bobbing lame at the trot.

Whew Been there done that LOL

I know Mr Pete Ramey claims that he's never met a Navicular horse that can't be cured with proper hoof trims but sadly I have yet to find someone with his passion for excellence and burning desire to make Navicular horses sound.

Still looking tho......
     
    05-07-2013, 04:31 AM
  #9
Green Broke
I will post before and after pictures of the Xrays when we get them; another four weeks to see if it has worked! Will also ask the vet for the name of the stuff.

She is 16, and we are hoping this will work. She has pads under her shoes, but it isn't enough now. If it doesn't, we will send her to a retirement home as long as she has no pain.
     
    05-07-2013, 08:15 AM
  #10
Trained
The normal 'treatment' is palliative which helps the symptoms, generally temporarily, as it is conventionally considered incurable & progressive. Tends to be shoes with pads, raising the heels gradually more as the 'treatment' ceases to be effective.

Underrun 'no heels', long toes, broken back pastern axis, or high heels tend to be major factors. Getting hooves (back) into functioning form is a big part of the answer. Dr Robert Bowker is very well worth looking up, as is Mayfield Barehoof Care Centre Home Page & many other sites & sources to learn more.
waresbear and KeroKero like this.
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
navicular changes connorsmum Horse Health 7 07-27-2010 09:28 AM
Navicular Disease StPaula Horse Health 14 06-28-2010 08:30 PM
NAVICULAR...or something else?! What do you think? edozier1 Horse Health 10 01-15-2009 07:49 PM
navicular NimblesGirl12 Horse Health 1 01-13-2009 03:07 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:12 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0