New horse's hooves have started "clacking".
 
 

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New horse's hooves have started "clacking".

This is a discussion on New horse's hooves have started "clacking". within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Pic of horses and horse hooves
  • Horse hoof popping sound

 
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    06-04-2012, 01:11 AM
  #1
Banned
New horse's hooves have started "clacking".

I have had my boy Drifter for about a month now. I will go ahead and say he is my first horse () (sorry I get all excited when I think about it), but I have been riding for about 18 years now.

I have been riding him VERY often, 4 or 5 times a week/1-2 hours per ride (if not more) and while riding today I noticed a "clacking" sound as he walked. It almost sounded like a "popping". I am sorry if these descriptions don't make sense but please bare with me. I dismounted and checked his hooves to see if perhaps there was a lodged rock or something, but nothing. The clacking noise seemed to only come from his left side, and sometimes it would be his front left clacking and then others it was his back left. I have never noticed this before, and he did not do it when trotting or cantering on the ride, only at the walk. It was even noticeable as I led him to his pasture at the end of the day (once again only on his left side). I have done some online research and I feel like maybe he's forging? He is an Appendix and he does have some lonnng TB legs, but his back is not that short. He is about 16.2/16.3h and he is 7 years old. He is shod on all 4 feet and is due for a trim (farrier is coming this Tuesday)

Should I mention this noise to the farrier? Or is not a big deal and I would be over reacting? One of the major reasons I'm concerned is lately when going down a section of trail which is fairly steep and hard packed dirt/some gravel his hind legs have been slipping out to the side from underneath him. It startles the heck out of both him and me! I at first thought it was just a traction issue but now I am wondering if these two issues are related. Posting a pic of him so if there ARE conformation issues that I am just not seeing, others can help me out :) Thanks!
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    06-04-2012, 03:00 AM
  #2
Trained
Hi,

Yes, it may be forging or such & yes, definitely mention it to your farrier. Don't know about the back legs business - perhaps look into locking patellas? It's possible something like that could cause forging. Can't comment on conformation sorry, because you need to give us some better pics - squarely side, front & back on would be good.
     
    06-04-2012, 03:23 AM
  #3
Banned
Thank you so much! I will mention this to my farrier and see what he says. I have heard a little bit about locking stifles, but none of the signs I remember reading have been shown by him. Besides that one trail location he has no slipping problems, and while working in the round pen I have not noticed any abnormalities in his gait. However, I will also mention this issue to my farrier and see if he believes that to be a possibility as well. If so, I'll get a vet out ASAP.

Also, yes, I thought that might be the case with the conformation. I will try and get some better pictures of him tomorrow morning.
     
    06-04-2012, 03:29 AM
  #4
Trained
If the back leg thing is only in that one steep location, perhaps it's only steep terrain & it's in his back/hips that there is a problem. I'd consider getting a bodyworker come check him over.
     
    06-04-2012, 03:33 AM
  #5
Super Moderator
Sounds like forging. When the front toes get long, the length of the toe slows down the break over speed of the front foot. So, the back foot catches up with it too soon and the tip of the back foot clanks against the sole of the front foot, thus the clacking sound.
Once his feet are trimmed up, I bet it'll go away.
     
    06-04-2012, 03:43 AM
  #6
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie    
If the back leg thing is only in that one steep location, perhaps it's only steep terrain & it's in his back/hips that there is a problem. I'd consider getting a bodyworker come check him over.
I am definitely considering that! Just didn't want to jump to over react mode, when it might be something simple like traction.

I do need to add though that he always slips in this one location, but it is when we're going down the hill and he's on the gravel/really packed and hard dirt section. I have gone down this same hill and a few steeper ones while staying on the grass and there was no slipping and he moves fine. Does that change you thinking it might be a back/hip problem? Also, once his leg slides out he just keeps going. No signs of lameness or other abnormalities. Doesn't "give" right after. It's just sort of a *swooosh* to the side, he jerks his head up a little bit regaining his balance, my heart jumps into my throat and he just keeps on walking like "phew that was close!".

I have noticed when being led down this slope, if I ask him to cross this part, he slows down and seems to "sit back" more and he takes his time planting his feet. Another reason I was like "hmm, maybe traction". I appreciate your advice and I will definitely have someone come look at him! If you have more suggestions, opinions or any kind of experience with this please keep sharing :)
     
    06-04-2012, 05:45 AM
  #7
Trained
Yeah, who knows without having him examined & it may be nothing at all aside from him slipping & rebalancing. Isn't it lucky they've got 4 legs??
     
    06-08-2012, 03:11 AM
  #8
Banned
Yes it is lucky loosie!

Forge to say the farrier came out this past Tuesday and we discussed it. He was indeed forging, but only because he was due for a trim. The slipping of his back legs was due to the traction being worn down on his shoes. We actually took the shoes off to see how he would do barefoot, and he is doing great. No more slipping :)
Thank you every one for the help and suggestions!
     

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