New horses hooves - how bad are they, honestly? - Page 4
 
 

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New horses hooves - how bad are they, honestly?

This is a discussion on New horses hooves - how bad are they, honestly? within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category

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        09-11-2013, 04:31 PM
      #31
    Showing
    LOL, well, he certainly seems like a rambunctious little guy .

    I'm leaning more toward the lameness being in his left hind, though I may be wrong. It may just be because of his conformation, but it appears that the LH has very unusual movement when he picks it up to take a step. It's almost like his pastern turns outward and his hoof folds up underneath toward his other leg.

    His RH appears to do it to, but not to the extent of the left.
         
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        09-11-2013, 05:28 PM
      #32
    Foal
    New video.....


    Yes, he can be a bit rambunctious Typical for a mostly unhandled 2yo stallion imo, he will get better with time - and gelding of course will help :)
    smrobs and Missy May like this.
         
        09-11-2013, 06:17 PM
      #33
    Trained
    Toeing out is much less now, his hinds are better also. I have only the phone so the video is very small, but I don't see anything off anymore. He's a bit crooked because he's held quite short. If there is anything off, I'd opt for right, since he's holding his tail to the left a bit.
         
        09-12-2013, 05:36 AM
      #34
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by deserthorsewoman    
    I can assure you, EquineGirl, she is working on it! Being a young horse, I expect him to go up in height before filling out anyway. No need to coming down on her like that.
    How did I "come down on her"?

    I merely stated that the ribby condition of the horse concerned me and briefly pointed out what I do whenever I acquire a new horse. Yes a young horse is going to be lean as it is still growing, but delaying a vet check for more than a few weeks after the horse is in possession? I don't get that...
         
        09-12-2013, 08:58 AM
      #35
    Foal
    I agree with the crookedness. But not because he is held short, but because he is inherently crooked. It has, even at the age of only 2, left a mark on his hooves. The FR is much narrower and more upright than the FL. This can be seen on the before trim pictures too. Also his RH tends to track further under the body than his LH. This gives this weird pattern.

    In my experience, this is going to be a life long issue, that can be managed with lots of movement on straight lines, good hoof care (adjusting the angles of the front feet to a certain degree) and body work to release muscle spasms. If not addressed, you will find that you have a difficult time staying balanced on him when you start riding, your saddle will lean to the right and he will be stiff in turns towards the right.
         
        09-12-2013, 09:06 AM
      #36
    Foal
    EquineGirl, I think it does not matter if a horse, that has been neglected for 2 years, sees the vet after 1, 2 or 3 weeks, if it does not have obvious problems. I think it is a good time when he is gelded, because he will be sedated and one could have a good look at his teeth then. Crocked horses often also have crooked teeth, they prefer to chew on one side over the other. So that is a good time to check that out too.
         
        09-12-2013, 09:26 AM
      #37
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by horselover1    
    EquineGirl, I think it does not matter if a horse, that has been neglected for 2 years, sees the vet after 1, 2 or 3 weeks, if it does not have obvious problems. I think it is a good time when he is gelded, because he will be sedated and one could have a good look at his teeth then. Crocked horses often also have crooked teeth, they prefer to chew on one side over the other. So that is a good time to check that out too.
    As long as the horse is looked at prior to being sedated as some issues are only apparent when the horse is fully awake. What if there's some underlying reason for the horse being lean apart from a dental issue? What if there's additional problems with the legs from the lack of hoof care in the horse's past? If it were one of my horses, I'd want to find out sooner than later...but that's just me.
         
        09-12-2013, 09:56 AM
      #38
    Green Broke
    I think his hooves look much better. He looks off on the left hind to me as well. To me it looks like he might have had an abscess in the foot. The feet look unbalanced, but the collateral groove seems to have equal depth on both sides so I don't think he's terribly off. But I'm no expert and its hard to tell with just picts.
    All and all I think the trimmer did a pretty good job.
    When you have him gelded the vet can look at his teeth. Our vet pulled Havok's wolf teeth when he was gelded.
         
        09-12-2013, 01:20 PM
      #39
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by EquineGirl1965    
    How did I "come down on her"?

    I merely stated that the ribby condition of the horse concerned me and briefly pointed out what I do whenever I acquire a new horse. Yes a young horse is going to be lean as it is still growing, but delaying a vet check for more than a few weeks after the horse is in possession? I don't get that...

    When did I say I have had this horse for "weeks" ?? The horse has been on my property for 10 days. If I did not see any improvement I would have the vet out, or haul him to the vet asap. However, as I see improvement and I will not be gelding him for a few more weeks I will wait. The vet and I agree that waiting till the heat and flies die down is better than doing it right away. Also waiting till he fills out a bit more. :)

    Now, to prove my point:

    Pics from when I saw him 1st;





    Pic from the day he came home;



    Pics from today;







    Please do not try and tell me you cannot see the improvement.
         
        09-12-2013, 01:44 PM
      #40
    Showing
    OP, don't worry, the improvement is exceedingly obvious . He is moving a lot better post trim but he still does look a bit off. When the vet comes out to geld him, you might have him do a flexion test before you sedate just to see if there might be something to look at there. Then again, he may just be one of those horses that travels funky.

    My brother had a horse years ago that he called Taco. Taco had a funky walk that made it look like he was mildly lame. Vet checks and chiro appointments and x-rays never came up with any reason for it. It never got better or worse, and it was only obvious at the walk. Jason rode Taco for years, used him in a feedlot, team roped on him, and finally sold him as a heading horse and Taco never took a truly lame step...he just traveled a bit funny *shrugs*.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by EquineGirl1965    
    As long as the horse is looked at prior to being sedated as some issues are only apparent when the horse is fully awake. What if there's some underlying reason for the horse being lean apart from a dental issue? What if there's additional problems with the legs from the lack of hoof care in the horse's past? If it were one of my horses, I'd want to find out sooner than later...but that's just me.
    I'm not entirely sure why you're making such a big deal about this. She's had the horse for only a few days and he is making progress with his weight. He was mildly neglected when she brought him home and he's still young and growing. Being a little ribby in that situation doesn't automatically mean that something major is wrong that she needs to spend hundreds on vet bills just to find out that he's fine but has been neglected and is still young....something that she already knew .

    If she'd had him for a few months and he hadn't made any progress, then yes, I would suggest a vet, but for goodness sake, everyone knows that a thin horse isn't going to bulk up overnight.
         

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