Oh no! White line disease!
 
 

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Oh no! White line disease!

This is a discussion on Oh no! White line disease! within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Difference between thrush and white line disease
  • My horse has white line disease

 
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    07-24-2012, 07:20 PM
  #1
Weanling
Oh no! White line disease!

I was just told today that my boy has white line disease. Two of his feet are not too bad, but the other two its hard to tell how far up it goes. I've been told to soak them with white lightening and vinegar for 40 minutes, three times a week for at least a month. Unfortunately, white lightening is all sold out in the area as this is going around like crazy right now. There is a tack store about two hours away that may have some, or I may have to get my friends in the next province over to mail me some.
I've never dealt with this issue before, so am a little nervous. She took a bit of the wall off the sides that were the worst to help the soaking penetrate better.
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    07-25-2012, 10:53 PM
  #2
Trained
Hi,

'white line disease/seedy toe' is an opportunistic infection, meaning that there are underlying problems that allow the infection in. Could be mechanical probs with hoof balance or such, could be dietary, could be environment/wet footing for eg.

So, assuming the horse is being well trimmed regularly, carefully consider diet & environment & change it to be healthier if at all possible - eg. Drier environ. Part of the trim that I belive is vital, unless perhaps all your other conditions are ideal, is to 'resect' the seedy area - that is, cut it out, as leaving it there can just allow it to eat healthy tissue as quickly as it can grow, so will allow the problem to perpetuate or worsen.
     
    07-26-2012, 05:30 AM
  #3
Weanling
Thank you for the information. Apparently, tons of people in the area are finding this issue this year. All the farriers believe its because we had such a mild winter last year and not due to improper care\trims. My boy is on a 4 week trim schedule (always has been), his paddock has been bone dry for the last few months (we've only had a few days of rain), and he's being fed blue seal carb guard and flax seed twice a day, and good quality hay as well as a mineral block available at night. He could be missing something in his diet, but I have no idea what it might be. If everyone in the area is getting it, maybe there is something deficient in the hay this year? You usually never hear about horses getting this around here, unless they are in bad conditions.
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    07-26-2012, 05:33 AM
  #4
Weanling
The farrier cut out as much as she thought she could safely do without him needing shoes. She said if the soaking does not work by next trim, it will all have to be cut out, and shoes put on. She said she's seen much worse so far this year, and the white lightning cleared it right up. I managed to find some, so plan to pick it up on saturday and start the soaks.
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    07-26-2012, 06:10 AM
  #5
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by gothicangel69    
The farrier cut out as much as she thought she could safely do without him needing shoes. She said if the soaking does not work by next trim, it will all have to be cut out, and shoes put on. She said she's seen much worse so far this year, and the white lightning cleared it right up. I managed to find some, so plan to pick it up on saturday and start the soaks.
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Re your area, yes, it's been rife in my area too, due to perpetual wet ground. It's great that your place is 'bone dry' now at least, that's a start.

Yes, one of the most 'ideal conditions' IMO is diligent owners that do actually treat feet frequently in between trims, because that does make a huge difference. While it's possible extensive resecting may require some sort of bracing, I've never found shoes to be a necessity for treating & due to the peripheral loading, I would generally think of them as unhelpful for this sort of problem. Be interesting to know why she feels shoes would be necessary with resecting & for you to look into it, so you can make an informed decision if it comes to that.

Re nutrition, while deficencies/imbalance do tend to make horses more prone to this kind of infection, it wouldn't likely be causing it so to speak. Check out feedxl.com if you want to find out exactly what your horse is getting & needs.
     
    07-26-2012, 11:27 AM
  #6
Green Broke
Mineral imbalance in the soil they walk/live on can sometimes make a difference.

I never had wall separation issues until I moved here. I had thrush issues with my club hoof horse but never wall separation. "In the old days" my horses were even on grain.

"These days" they haven't seen grain since 2007, get flax, eat a high quality vit/min supplement, on and on and on.

Our ground is very acidic. My Ag person told me that means it's a breeding ground for "things fungal & bacterial" during the high heat/humidity months that we experience. So, depending on soil balance or imbalance dry or wet sometimes doesn't matter.

It's bad enough I fight wall separation on my two metabolic horses but I have to give due diligence to the two healthy hoofed horses to keep their hooves under control; that includes thrush.

If your horse comes in during any part of the day, keeping the shavings clean also helps. I muck manure every day but only change the shavings "as needed" where urine is concerned.

My horses have grid mats on top of limestone crush, so the urine does drain and saves me a day or two ----- except for the club hoof horse who is really prone to thrush. I change his shavings every 2 - 3 days and he's only in his stall at night

I only bring the shavings up because everything little thing you can do to keep the fungus/bacteria out of the separated areas, the faster the hooves will heal.

I hope progress is fast - I don't envy you.
     
    07-26-2012, 11:50 AM
  #7
Weanling
The reason she said shoes would be required is that the infection is not in the toe, but along the sides of the hoof (which she said is a bit unusual). If she has to cut a bunch off the sides, she said something about the hoof wall being compromised and causing more problems if not shod (I don't understand it too much though).
Our soil is also very acidic, which would make sense why everyone is getting it then. I know of 5 people personally whose horses have this issue at the moment.
My boy's not ouchie at all, which is good, but I'm giving him time off until his next trim as he's a bit unbalanced due to her cutting out a bit of the hoof.
Would light lunging be ok? I know movement is great for getting blood flow in the area, and thought it may help them heal better?
He is outside all day, and brought in at night. The stalls are picked out every day (and all pee spots removed). New shavings added every few days.
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    07-26-2012, 08:48 PM
  #8
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by gothicangel69    
The reason she said shoes would be required is that the infection is not in the toe, but along the sides of the hoof (which she said is a bit unusual). If she has to cut a bunch off the sides, she said something about the hoof wall being compromised
Seedy toes are probably a bit more common than quarters because farriers/owners allowing hooves to overgrow & run forward is just so common. But around here at least, it seems that overgrown, flared quarters are also pretty common so infection in them is too. Of course, wherever it is, the hoof wall integrity is further compromised if resected, but I don't see what's different about the quarters in that regard. If you need to cut out say, more than half way up the wall, I'd brace it, across the face of the wall. Putting on a rim shoe, which forces the walls into the primary weightbearing role & holds the base of the resected area together without doing anything for above is not helpful IMO.

Quote:
My boy's not ouchie at all, which is good, but I'm giving him time off until his next trim as he's a bit unbalanced due to her cutting out a bit of the hoof.
Would light lunging be ok? I know movement is great for getting blood flow in the area, and thought it may help them heal better?
He is outside all day, and brought in at night.
Is it in the heel then, if he's imbalanced? If so, perhaps don't work him over very hard ground for now, but otherwise should be fine if he's not lame. Seedy doesn't generally cause lameness IME, but in the quarters/heels does sometimes cause a horse to become lame. I'd keep him out 24/7 as yes, exercise is helpful.
     
    07-26-2012, 09:53 PM
  #9
Weanling
It is from the heel and all of the quarters on two feet, and a bit by the heels on the other two. She had to cut out a bit of the quarters, and as he's already clumbsy, and she was unable to balance it comepletely because of this, he is tripping abit, which is why he's not being riddin. He's not lame at all though, so maybe I'll start doing some light lunging with him. He gets cranky when not given a job anyways. Unfortunately, I can't keep him out 24\7 as he hates being outside when its dark and its not an option where I board anyways.
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