to old to shoe??
   

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to old to shoe??

This is a discussion on to old to shoe?? within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • 22 year old horse lame after shod
  • To shoe or not to shoe a horse

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  • 1 Post By Horseman56

 
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    03-19-2012, 09:14 AM
  #1
Started
to old to shoe??

Denny and bailey are about 15 years old. Denny has never seen shoes and I don't know about bailey. I was thinking of having my farrier put front shoes on them since we are starting to do more riding but I am nervous they wont take to it.

Is it every to late to introduce shoes??

Also how high of a chance is there to a horse becoming lame after being shoed??
     
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    03-19-2012, 10:07 AM
  #2
Started
We have a 22 year old gelding that will be shod this year. And they absolutely should NOT be lame at all after being shod. I would be extremely concerned if they were.
     
    03-19-2012, 10:10 AM
  #3
Started
Thanks I am new to the shoeing side of things... they are getting done this week and want to make sure the worst should not happen if done correctly.
     
    03-20-2012, 12:28 AM
  #4
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by kait18    
denny and bailey are about 15 years old. Denny has never seen shoes and I don't know about bailey. I was thinking of having my farrier put front shoes on them since we are starting to do more riding but I am nervous they wont take to it.

Is it every to late to introduce shoes??
I've shod some pretty old horses (30+) but those are the exceptions, not the rule. In short, if they are still healthy enough to be ridden, they are probably okay for shoeing when appropriate.

Quote:
also how high of a chance is there to a horse becoming lame after being shoed??
Shoeing always includes some risk. Hot nails, close nails, sprung heels and lack of sole relief are common examples of possible problems. The experience level of your practitioner will have a significant impact on reducing risks. Every farrier incurs some risk of error when trimming/shoeing a horse. The question becomes, does the farrier take responsibility for any subsequent problem and address the concern in a professional and timely manner?

We all make mistakes. In my own practice, if I make a mistake, I own it and I'll do whatever it takes to make it right.

By the way... given that you are from New Jersey, you do know that you are close to one of the top farriers in the country, right? There are some hellishly good hands in your neck of the woods.

Cheers,
Mark
kait18 likes this.
     
    03-20-2012, 12:43 AM
  #5
Showing
So long as your farrier does a good job, then the horses should be able to function just as well (or better) in shoes as they did barefoot.

Like Mark said, there are always risks when shoeing a horse that might cause lameness and while it does happen, it's not exactly a common thing with a good farrier so I really wouldn't worry about it.
     
    03-28-2012, 11:46 AM
  #6
Started
Thanks guys :) I have always kept them barefoot but now with the more riding we are doing I think he needs them... so you have put my negatives aside

And yes mark I have a bunch of great farriers in my area luckily :) I was an apprentice for 2 farriers and lets just say everyone is different lol and I learned alot sadly nothing about shoeing only about trimming
     
    03-28-2012, 05:28 PM
  #7
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by kait18    
thanks guys :) I have always kept them barefoot but now with the more riding we are doing I think he needs them... so you have put my negatives aside

And yes mark I have a bunch of great farriers in my area luckily :) I was an apprentice for 2 farriers and lets just say everyone is different lol and I learned alot sadly nothing about shoeing only about trimming
If you want one of the best, look for a fellow in your area named Bob Pethick. He's not cheap and his availability may be nil, but you'd be hard pressed to find anyone with more skill.

Cheers,
Mark
     
    03-29-2012, 09:12 AM
  #8
Started
I have heard great things about him. I willl look him up and hope I can be squeezed into his schedule
     
    03-29-2012, 10:38 AM
  #9
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by kait18    
i have heard great things about him. I willl look him up and hope I can be squeezed into his schedule
Bob does a lot of clinician work so getting him to your place may be tough. He's one of the few AFA CJF's in the country and a founding member of the American Association of Professional Farriers. The association keeps him fairly busy.

If he does shoe your horse, any risk concerns associated with that work just went to about zero.

He lives in Califon, New Jersey and can be reached at 1-908-510-2462.

When you talk with him, say hello for me.

Cheers,
Mark
     

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