Outward pointing hooves--Just have a few questions
 
 

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Outward pointing hooves--Just have a few questions

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  • what to expect with toed out horse
  • Horse hooves that point outwards

 
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    12-06-2011, 10:30 PM
  #1
Yearling
Outward pointing hooves--Just have a few questions

So I'm horse shopping... AGAIN. -.- But I found a REALLY cute 16.3hh 9yo TB gelding in my area. I like the looks of him, he is very stocky and would make a very pretty dressage horse. I emailed the owner and he said that his feet point outward, but aside from that he has never been lame and is healthy.

So is there a way to kind of correct it with trimming/shoeing? Or should I just not worry about it?

Would it interfere with him collecting or jumping? Would I get marked down at a show for it?

Any info would be great!!
Thanks
     
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    12-06-2011, 10:37 PM
  #2
Trained
Poor lower limb conformation can increase the occurence of osteoarthritis, especially ringbone.

I would advise X-raying the lower limbs of all 4 legs as part of your pre-purchase exam... a 9 y/o with this kind of conformation that has been ridden regularily would most likely already be showing arthritic changes related to his conformation. Why else would the horse be for sale?? There is always a reason!

Good luck!
     
    12-06-2011, 10:42 PM
  #3
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by ~*~anebel~*~    

... a 9 y/o with this kind of conformation that has been ridden regularily would most likely already be showing arthritic changes related to his conformation. Why else would the horse be for sale??

Good luck!
Umm, because horses of every shape, size and conformation come up for sale all the time? I have yet to meet a perfect horse. And conformation faults can be subjective.
     
    12-06-2011, 10:49 PM
  #4
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by eventerwannabe    
So is there a way to kind of correct it with trimming/shoeing?
Nope. Toeing out is a congenital, conformational defect. While there are certainly some practitioners that will attempt to "correct" such defects in a mature horse, it's a worse than poor idea.

Quote:
Or should I just not worry about it?
There's little sense in worrying about things we can't change.

Quote:
Would it interfere with him collecting or jumping?
A conformational defect in the limb is going to represent at least some degradation in performance potential. Exactly how much is impossible to say without seeing the horse.

Given that the seller felt it important to mention the problem, there's fair reason to presume the defect is significant. It's a buyers market and there are lots of good horses available.

Quote:
Would I get marked down at a show for it?
Odds are better than good that the average rider will find many opportunities to get "marked down" that have nothing to do with whether their horse is toed-out or not.

Cheers,
Mark
     
    12-06-2011, 10:49 PM
  #5
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by eventerwannabe    
So is there a way to kind of correct it with trimming/shoeing? Or should I just not worry about it?
No, you should not try to fix it on an adult horse because the growth plates are already closed and you can cause the lameness problems you are hoping to prevent.

It's really hard to say anything on the internet because we have no idea what the horse actually looks like. Some people say their horse has a flaw and you can barely see it. Other horses really have bad limb conformation. Without seeing the horse no one can really speculate on his show ring prospects.

Yes, the more perfect conformation the better, but every horse (that I have ever met) has slight deviations here and there. Even a "perfect" horse may not be perfect for all disciplines. That is what I mean about conformation being subjective. It depends on what you want to do with the horse and how bad his faults are. And how high you expect to go in the show world.

I would be careful about front end problems on a horse that is expected to jump though.
     
    12-06-2011, 10:56 PM
  #6
Yearling
I'm in the market for a free project horse, so my options are a little limited. The horse is for sale so cheap because the market in my area sucks and because the guy just don't want to have the horse anymore, he isn't riding him (other things going on in life).
I am going to try to go see him tomorrow morning, I will get pictures/videos that I can post. (:
     
    12-06-2011, 11:03 PM
  #7
Green Broke
Well, if it's a nice horse, you can't hardly look a gift horse in the mouth!

Personally, my expectations do differ with the price of the horse. My $2000 horse is near perfect (training/disposition wise) and my $500 horse isn't perfect but I love her to death.

Best of luck!
     
    12-06-2011, 11:04 PM
  #8
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by trailhorserider    
Umm, because horses of every shape, size and conformation come up for sale all the time? I have yet to meet a perfect horse. And conformation faults can be subjective.
Generally, horses that are for sale are as so because they are one or both of lame and/or crazy.
A 9 y/o (who sells a 9 y/o - that is a horse's prime!!) that is for sale with the seller disclosing "conformation issues" right off the bat is likely not as spry as he was a few years ago and the seller has realized this is soon going to show up as a lameness issue.

There is always a reason the horse is for sale - it is the buyers job to figure out why and then decide if they can deal with the issues present in the horse.
"Perfect" or close-to-it horses rarely come up for sale and when they do it's for a lot of money.

I have also never bought a perfect horse with perfect conformation. I pick and choose the behavioral and conformational limitations that I can deal with. X-raying the horse prior to purchase is the only way to tell if there are issues present and if they are managable.
     
    12-06-2011, 11:13 PM
  #9
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by eventerwannabe    
I'm in the market for a free project horse,
Don't mean to rain on anyone's parade but... there's no such thing as a "free horse", project or otherwise.

One of my clients recently dropped $8,000 in vet costs on their "free" horse.

Cheers,
Mark
     
    12-06-2011, 11:19 PM
  #10
Yearling
I'm aware. LOL! But you get what I mean. I could also get an 8k horse and drop 5 grand on it within the first month of owning it in vet bills. Horses are one big, expensive risk, but taking risks is part of life. (:
I'm a young rider, gotta work with what I got!!
     

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