The painful search for a reliable farrier - Page 2
 
 

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The painful search for a reliable farrier

This is a discussion on The painful search for a reliable farrier within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Why aren't farriers reliable, i thought they needed a job
  • Do hi/low horses require shoes

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    11-17-2011, 01:59 AM
  #11
Trained
"Painful" is right.
Took me 3 years and 6 farriers with this horse to find someone good and not 4 hours away!!
With my last farrier we had a few conflicts with her having ideas which do not mesh with the horse's career and actually ended up with the horse being on stall rest for a few weeks. It ended up I had to pay my vet to come out every time she was out to supervise her. She was also not a horsewoman and ended up letting my dominant, headstrong horse turn into a beligerent ******* for farrier work and for our last appointment she TEXTED me, less than 12 hours before to tell me she "couldnt make it". And thank goodness she did! I ended up phoning a very well respected farrier in an adjacent area and he suggested a farrier I had used in the past, but whom had quit shoeing following breaking a foot (unrelated to shoeing) and was planning on moving but didn't. He had just been back from the HITS Thermal circuit and was building a client base.
Of course, the vet came out to supervise the first shoeing and not only did he impress my vet enough that he asked him for a card but in one shoeing, corrected all the behavioral issues as well with no hitting or yelling and very little shenanigans. Vet has not been out to supervise the shoing since and his feet are nothing short of amazing - he is correcting things other farriers felt needed to be fixed by a year off barefoot and doing it faster and with no agitation to the legs. The finishing work is perfect. He even polishes the front edge and clips of the shoes before re-applying them. He normally shoes jumpers and for my horse has been doing research into shoeing dressage horses and is experimenting with similar techniques as are used with horses like Totilas. He suggests new techniques for everything. He corked my horse lighter than he's ever been corked this year with a new technology and it works amazing while his hooves are nice and flush to the ground and he doesn't have big things to step on himself with.

I have always re booked appointments during the current appointment. Saves me tons of trouble!!! It always helps to have a referral from an existing, good client.
     
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    11-17-2011, 02:17 AM
  #12
Showing
Oh man.. farrier is so important!

One thing I HAVE to have in a farrier is understanding how to balance a hoof properly. Getting the right angles, whether barefoot (how we roll) or with shoes.. they neeeeeed to understand that concept or I will NOT let them near my horse!

Pluses are professionalism (calling if they will be late, NEVER being late, respecting my horse (who I will make sure respects their space.. aka no snuggling, slamming hooves down, kicking, biting, pushing, etc.), reasonable prices (right now it's $45 for a trim) and my horse needs to get along with this person as do I... I've had farriers undermine me, be rude in general because of my age.. and it really irks me and of course my horse too.. and it doesn't end well.

But they are SO important, I'm very lucky to have found a fabulous trimmer the first time around.. and I just moved here!
     
    11-20-2011, 09:40 PM
  #13
Trained
I can relate to this thread! Let's see...

Farrier 1 - Came with the horse. Had a fixation of making the front feet match despite my horse being a classic high/low. Also shoes kept coming off, so next...

Farrier 2 - Cowboy shoer. Worked fine for the thicker hooved QH's at the barn, but 3 close nails and 2 abscesses later on my thin walled TB, I moved on...

Farrier 3 - Came on recommendation. This guy was the worst of the bunch. Very rough with my horse. If he tried to take his rear leg back, the guy would really jerk him back into place to the point where the horse was lame for days after. He also loved very long toes and apparently underrun heels which resulted in a nice case of deep sulcus thrush...onto next guy.

Farrier 4 - Loved him. Balanced my horse beautifully. Toes just right. Found out he was adjusting his price according to town and was really making some extra $$ on me. I ended up moving out of his range anyway, so no harm done I suppose. At least I got to see what a good foot looked like and gained some much needed knowledge.

Farrier 5 - Liked him until toes started getting longer with each trim. Cracks developed. We disagreed on toes. Next...

Farrier 6 - Place the shoes a good 1" behind the toe, then took a rasp and shaved off the entire 1" while my jaw fell on the floor. No expansion space in back. Poor horse didn't even know he had feet for the next 3 weeks.

Farrier 7 - Cue the singing angels!!! This guys is fantastic. Perfect angles. Shoes high/lows very well. Horse moves great. The irony is, I told myself this guy was my last farrier, and if it didn't work I was done with shoes. Even though I love this guy, I ended up pulling my horse's rear shoes. It's not for farrier related reasons, but a bit ironic.

I wish you luck in your search. Your good farrier is out there. Hopefully you'll find him/her sooner than later!
     
    11-21-2011, 02:16 AM
  #14
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck    
Farrier 6 - Place the shoes a good 1" behind the toe, then took a rasp and shaved off the entire 1" while my jaw fell on the floor. No expansion space in back.
Don't know what you mean by 'expansion space' & not talking specifically of your situation, but setting the shoes back & trimming that much from an overlong toe(depending how it's done) is not necessarily a bad point IMO. If the horse has long, stretched toes, they do need to be backed right up.
     
    11-21-2011, 05:48 PM
  #15
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie    
Don't know what you mean by 'expansion space' & not talking specifically of your situation, but setting the shoes back & trimming that much from an overlong toe(depending how it's done) is not necessarily a bad point IMO. If the horse has long, stretched toes, they do need to be backed right up.
Doesn't taking that much off blow right through the hoof wall/ water line/ white line etc? By expansion space, I mean the small edge all the way around where you're supposed to be able to roll a penny on it's side to allow the hoof to spread out a bit as it grows. (hope I described that right)
     
    11-21-2011, 09:41 PM
  #16
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck    
Doesn't taking that much off blow right through the hoof wall/ water line/ white line etc? By expansion space, I mean the small edge all the way around where you're supposed to be able to roll a penny on it's side to allow the hoof to spread out a bit as it grows. (hope I described that right)
If the foot is not deformed/stretched forward, then the shoe shouldn't be set too far back & rasping a great deal of toe from the front could be problematic. But the shoe should go - and foot be trimmed - where it *should* be, not just where it may be when overgrown/stretched and in that case, there may be a lot of excess material that needs to be removed, without getting anywhere near the sensitive tissue. As for 'expansion space', again IMO, the shoe should be fit to where the foot should be, or needs to be, not where it may grow to if left too long. **As some are quick to point out though, that part of my opinion is solely on theory & from what I've been told by other farriers - I'm not claiming to be an experienced shoer.
     
    11-22-2011, 12:48 AM
  #17
Trained
My horse is hi/lo and my farrier, whom I consider to be sent from the heavens he is so good, when he began shoeing him was setting the shoe on the low foot back and rasping. Maybe 1/16" or 1/8" at a time though. It has made a huge difference over almost 6 months to the point where the feet are staying more even and the low foot heel is getting less and less underrun. So I would say it is used - however a good farrier will realize that it takes a year for a hoof to grow out and you aren't going to make a huge change in 1 hour.
My farrier sets the shoe flush with the wall (and finishes the nails so so nicely) so the whole thing is entirely smooth. If your horse is overgrowing his shoes, you need to shorten the shoing period. The only place he leaves room on the shoes is the back where we are experimenting with trying to provide support and stability with the shoes.

(Just a disclaimer - we are not trying to "match" the front feet. They are hi lo and will never match, we know this. However, uneven hoof angles make an uneven moving horse. If anyone wants to hear my novel on how I manage my hi lo horse I can write a thread about it or PM me.)
     
    11-22-2011, 12:58 AM
  #18
Weanling
Wow! I never knew how much trouble it was to find a good farrier, I guess I just got lucky with my girl!

My farrier always does an excellent job, my horse has never been lame following a trim, and she does a fine job of answering any questions about the status of my horse's hooves. She is easy to contact, both by phoning and texting, my only complaints are that she is often late ( except when I decide to be relatively late as well to save waiting time, when THAT happens she is right on schedule lol )
     
    11-22-2011, 08:23 PM
  #19
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by ~*~anebel~*~    
My horse is hi/lo and my farrier, whom I consider to be sent from the heavens he is so good, when he began shoeing him was setting the shoe on the low foot back and rasping. Maybe 1/16" or 1/8" at a time though. It has made a huge difference over almost 6 months to the point where the feet are staying more even and the low foot heel is getting less and less underrun. So I would say it is used - however a good farrier will realize that it takes a year for a hoof to grow out and you aren't going to make a huge change in 1 hour.
My farrier sets the shoe flush with the wall (and finishes the nails so so nicely) so the whole thing is entirely smooth. If your horse is overgrowing his shoes, you need to shorten the shoing period. The only place he leaves room on the shoes is the back where we are experimenting with trying to provide support and stability with the shoes.

(Just a disclaimer - we are not trying to "match" the front feet. They are hi lo and will never match, we know this. However, uneven hoof angles make an uneven moving horse. If anyone wants to hear my novel on how I manage my hi lo horse I can write a thread about it or PM me.)
Sounds like we found the same farrier! My farrier shoes the hi/lo like yours does with a slight tweak. He leaves the shoe on the low foot set slightly back (1/4" or so) while leaving the shoe on the high foot in the "normal" position. I can't believe what a change such a small adjustment made.

I agree that matching feet is wrong. If anything, that was my first experience as a first time horse owner that I knew I need to self educate a bit because that information sounded dead wrong.

I've been reading a lot about hi/lo's. I'm still trying to decipher if the situation can be completely nulled out by addressing the compensating factors that started it to begin with. Sounds like we should start a hi/lo thread.
     
    11-22-2011, 09:32 PM
  #20
Trained
Oh and in my area, if you are privileged enough to have a farrier that comes when scheduled, or comes at all, you'd better not have draft horses because according to all the farriers around here drafts are way too much work to do. <sheesh>

I'm so glad I do my own, but despite that I finally found a trimmer that I keep in touch with regularly and every so often she checks in on my work. In the 5 years or so that I've had horses in this area, even with my new trimmer, I would never be able to have my horses' feet trimmed when needed. They simply. Flat out. Would. Not. Come. That often. Wow.
     

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