The Photo Encyclopedia of Good Feet - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 20 Old 02-28-2017, 12:16 AM Thread Starter
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The Photo Encyclopedia of Good Feet

I realized that I learn by example. by seeing/hearing lots and lots of examples. this is how I learn anything, and I am hoping that I might learn about hooves this way, too.
I know there are lots of threads that explain this or that reason why a hoof photo is of a well trimmed hoof, or not so. and, I should be able to learn from that. but, maybe, if I just saw many , many photos of well trimmed or well shod feet, I'd start to be able to know quality when I see it.

Would you, Could you, post photos of feet that you are pretty sure are good examples of a well trimmed/well shod foot? you can explain why if you like, or just post the photos and let that speak for itself.
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post #2 of 20 Old 02-28-2017, 03:00 AM
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I should qualify that I don't actually take pictures of normal feet. It's usually of feet that are messed up in some way and how they turn out afterwards. So the photo of the bottom of a foot is one that is almost completely recovered from being debrided to treat a rather severe case of white line infection which is why you can still see two parts of the hoof wall still growing out at the toe (where I had to cut away the most hoof wall to treat the infection). The foot, however, is looking good otherwise. A good, healthy white line all the way around. A good solid base on the hoof wall (except for where it's still growing out on the toe). The photo of the outside of the hoof wall I had to crop from another photo, but it shows a well shaped and healthy rear foot (even if I do say so myself ).
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post #3 of 20 Old 02-28-2017, 09:01 AM
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This thread is just what I need!

I have an instinct that my horse's feet just aren't right, but I can't explain why. I have a new trimmer coming in a few weeks and was planning to put up a critique thread so I can ask the right questions when he comes, but looking at examples in a thread like this will be so helpful.
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post #4 of 20 Old 02-28-2017, 10:54 AM
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Sorry that I have no pics to share... just subbing! Awesome idea.

Duggan & Miss May
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post #5 of 20 Old 02-28-2017, 11:09 AM
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ooh I'm subbing as well.. I know there are tons of people with a vast knowledge I could learn a lot from here
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post #6 of 20 Old 02-28-2017, 05:19 PM
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oKay, first some good links, as That of Dr Robert Bowker, whose credentials on on the site

For more than ten years, Bowker’s research and clinical work has focused on the physiological function of the equine foot. The research has resulted in new recommendations that are leading to relief from navicular syndrome and other chronic foot ailments in the horse.

https://cvm.msu.edu/research/faculty...oot-laboratory

If you look around Pete's site, and read his various articles, the entire hoof thing becomes much clearer.
I also recommend the book he has advertised on site, "Rehabilitation of the equine foot.
Besides his own work, there are many contributing authors, Including vets that have specialized in equine podietry

http://www.hoofrehab.com/
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post #7 of 20 Old 02-28-2017, 05:27 PM
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Looking at some of the rehabilitative examples on Pete's site, also help, as you see the hooves transformed from pathological parameters to healthy and functional

Before and After pictures of lame horses
Then, you can also check out the ELPO site

http://www.lamenessprevention.org/as...eets-print.pdf
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post #8 of 20 Old 02-28-2017, 05:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by its lbs not miles View Post
I should qualify that I don't actually take pictures of normal feet. It's usually of feet that are messed up in some way and how they turn out afterwards. So the photo of the bottom of a foot is one that is almost completely recovered from being debrided to treat a rather severe case of white line infection which is why you can still see two parts of the hoof wall still growing out at the toe (where I had to cut away the most hoof wall to treat the infection). The foot, however, is looking good otherwise. A good, healthy white line all the way around. A good solid base on the hoof wall (except for where it's still growing out on the toe). The photo of the outside of the hoof wall I had to crop from another photo, but it shows a well shaped and healthy rear foot (even if I do say so myself ).
Good example, showing the sole depth, as seen along the collateral groves, healthy wide frog, short toe wall and short heels, with a tight white line
All the things you need, for healthy sound feet.
This does not mean that a horse has to be barefoot, but the trim before that shoing has to be very correct, as shoes will lock in any pathology, mask lameness issues,and even the best trim and shoing job will be trashed, with shoes allowed to be left on too long
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post #9 of 20 Old 02-28-2017, 05:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by its lbs not miles View Post
I should qualify that I don't actually take pictures of normal feet. It's usually of feet that are messed up in some way and how they turn out afterwards. So the photo of the bottom of a foot is one that is almost completely recovered from being debrided to treat a rather severe case of white line infection which is why you can still see two parts of the hoof wall still growing out at the toe (where I had to cut away the most hoof wall to treat the infection). The foot, however, is looking good otherwise. A good, healthy white line all the way around. A good solid base on the hoof wall (except for where it's still growing out on the toe). The photo of the outside of the hoof wall I had to crop from another photo, but it shows a well shaped and healthy rear foot (even if I do say so myself ).
You know what's funny, in Arizona I have never seen big healthy frogs like that. My horses don't grow them that robust and I have never seen anyone else's horses have big frogs like that either. I wonder if it's related to climate or we just have a bunch of cruddy feet out here?

I agree they are lovely frogs. I just don't know how you get them. My 6 year old has never been shod a day in his life, and his frogs aren't robust like that. It makes me wonder if the (normally) very dry climate has something to do with it. Or lack of pasture or something.
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post #10 of 20 Old 03-03-2017, 08:56 PM
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Gene Ovnicek says that the desert horses tend to have narrower feet. That might explain part of the narrower frog. But don't really know for certain.

I have learned from what I've read that the baby horse needs to either have lots of miles put on or have someone knowledgeable about trimming baby feet for the development of a strong caudal foot.

My horse's frogs have expanded considerably in the last almost three years but are nowhere close to some frogs that I see and wish for.

I seem to have a penchant for getting myself embroiled in controversy and have sworn to make an honest effort to avoid more of it.

That said, I feel a need to express an opinion, stress opinion, that trying to learn about feet by looking at healthy feet could be a trap.

For instance, it has long been a practice to sight down the hoof to determine balance in the heels. According to ELPO that can be misleading and one should learn to identify the live sole junction and simply trim equal to that junction on each heel.

OTOH, pictures of a heel trimmed to the back of the frog can be helpful. Video of someone doing it is even better.

The angle that P3 makes with the ground in a healthy foot varies from foot to foot, and the angle the hoof wall makes with the ground varies with it. I have a high instep that requires a wider shoe than what I measure for. Horses feet are different too. So the healthy feet are different within parameters.

But all healthy feet will have the proper proportions of breakover in front of the true frog apex, no dishing on the front or sides of the hoof, hoof wall the same distance from the live sole all around.

And then you get into a healthy foot in the sand, rocks, water, which are different.

I really think just studying pictures are a short cut to misunderstanding things that need to be understood about the internal foot.

I'm just trying to help. If I've misstated anywhere I am always open to learning.
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