Possible horse with founder but ends up worse then we think.
   

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Possible horse with founder but ends up worse then we think.

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        07-09-2013, 09:51 AM
      #1
    Foal
    Possible horse with founder but ends up worse then we think.

    I work on a horse farm where we have about 17 horses. So on a daily basis as some will agree. If its not one thing it's always another with horses. There always getting hurt or getting injured one way or the other. Our horses are on the out at night and in during the day schedule because of the flies. We have the boys and girls seperated except for a retired Grand Prix dressage horse who's in is 20s he's the only boy allowed with the girls. When I arrive at work I drive through a automatic gate. I drive down a long driveway with pastures on each side. We have 6 pastures total. But 4 of those pastures are combined into one big field so they have tons of space to run and enjoy being a horse. Well that morning when I drove down the drive way. I noticed one of our older mares standing alone. When everyone else in her field was in a different direction which was odd of her. Normally she is right with the herd. I wait until my co worker shows up and he agrees there is something wrong with her. I grab a lead rope and make the 20 mile hike to get her. That's what it seemed like, I would walk a mile for a sick horse to bring it back to safety. I throw a lead rope on her, she was retired so she didn't wear a halter in the field. I begin to walk and she won't take a step. After some kind words and gentle persuasion she starts to walk with me. It was ageny for her to walk. But I couldn't leave her outside. We make it to the barn. We could see it in her face that something was wrong. We're around these animals 24/7 so we know if they sneeze we know something is wrong.

    We immediately take her temperature. It was normal. We called the vet right away and she was on her way. We thought she was lame and needed some bute and other anti inflammation meds that the vet provided. She even had her baffled at the outcome. Our vet said that she cannot be turnout anymore. That she had foundered and she needs to stay off grass. After about the first few weeks, she didn't seem to be getting worse. We started walking her into the indoor which was only a few feet from her stall, she loved going in there to lay down and get off those painful front feet. This was her routine for about a few more weeks. We had farriers out and the vet on a constant basis just trying everything to get her comfortable.

    But as those weeks go by. I could see more and more in her face that something more deep down was wrong. There were days where we would sit with her to keep her company. The owner of the horse was trying to decide what she should do. Let her 20 some year old mare suffer anymore from what we thought was founder. She would never be able to go outside again and enjoy life as a horse. She would constantly be in pain. Then the vet came out one day she took some X-rays. It took about a day to develop. Well the founder that we thought she had because that is how she was walking. Even the vet told us it was founder. Until she saw the X-rays. What we thought was founder was her coffin bone in both front legs were coming though the bottom of her hooves. There was nothing that could of been done. No pain medication or operation could fix this. Our hearts were broken, we all fought for this little mare so hard and long. The owner decided she wasn't going to let her suffer. So the vet came out that night. We walked the mare into the indoor arena for the last time. We waited until she was laying in her normal spot. With me and my co worker and the owner. We're with her from the beginning of this journey to the very end. We wanted to make sure she wouldn't be scared. Then the vet put our precious mare to sleep. For the first time in a while that little mares ears were up and she looked at ease and not in pain anymore.

    The main reason I made this thread is the little signs such as founder or lame. Don't always assume its something simple. Don't always quit too early. When you use up the very last resource. That is why hoof care and knowing the signs that a horse is lame is very important cause you never know what could lay under the surface.
    Boo Walker likes this.
         
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        07-09-2013, 09:59 AM
      #2
    Showing
    It was founder. It's called 'sinking founder' when the coffin bones rotate and punch through the bottoms of the hooves. That's always a danger when horses badly founder.

    So sorry for the loss of this woman's horse. There's not much you can do once the coffin bone rotates that much.
         
        07-09-2013, 10:25 AM
      #3
    Trained
    Yes, definitely founder, and not treated aggressively enough, turned into perforation of the sole.
    This is why I keep telling new horse owners...learn....read, read, read, ask questions, think logically, learn. This poor mare probably could be still alive, maybe only with restricted grazing, but alive and well.......
    FaydesMom likes this.
         
        07-09-2013, 11:32 AM
      #4
    Foal
    The owner would of done anything to help her. Money was no object, we had two vets and two farriers look at her. There was nothing we could of done. If we could it would of been done. We tried every kind of pain medications and anti inflammatory and antibiotics. You should see our feed room with the amount of medication we had for her. It hurt her to even take a step. It took 6 of us to get her moving most of the days. The first vet said to put her down weeks ago. But we faught for her. She lived for weeks later. We tried everything, but when the vet said there is nothing more she can give her for her pain and with her being in the mid 20s the owner started to think about the horse and if it was fair for her.
         
        07-09-2013, 12:21 PM
      #5
    Yearling
    Much of the problem is farriers and vets are not well versed in treating laminitus with current methods. Sinking founder has to be treated much more aggressively. Positive pressure frog shoes and sole packing are the most successful ways I have heard along with icing the feet and legs and other pallative care. Its no picnic tho.
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        07-09-2013, 01:26 PM
      #6
    Foal
    From the first day we found it was founder. The owner went out and baught styrofoam and vet wrap. And kinda made a padded shoe. Then we got her one of those padded shoes from the vet. The vet would come twice a day for almost a month. To give us supplies so we could keep her food on the pads. The vet would always give her a numbing shot in her ankles for us to touch her feet to treat them. If it was up to me I'd keep trying. But I wasn't the owner and she wouldn't listen to anyone but the vet. I only made this thread to let people that are not aware that if there horse comes up lame or limping that they don't just assume there horse is lame. Cause there could be something else brewing in there feet or legs.
         
        07-09-2013, 01:33 PM
      #7
    Weanling
    I think this may have been for the best. There are many days when I think I should have put my mare down when she first foundered. Treating a foundered horse never really ends, and there's a lot of heart ache on both sides. I will agree though, that this would have been treatable if caught earlier and treated more aggressively. A better trained farrier may even have noticed this when it was mild and a grazing muzzle or dry lot could have stopped it altogether. It is frustrating how little many professionals seem to know about founder and laminitis.
         
        07-09-2013, 01:46 PM
      #8
    Trained
    I am so sorry this horse had to suffer, and you had to witness it. She is out of pain now, remember her fondly and learn what signs to look for to prevent it from happening again. Thank you for sharing your story.
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        07-09-2013, 01:53 PM
      #9
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Viranh    
    I think this may have been for the best. There are many days when I think I should have put my mare down when she first foundered. Treating a foundered horse never really ends, and there's a lot of heart ache on both sides. I will agree though, that this would have been treatable if caught earlier and treated more aggressively. A better trained farrier may even have noticed this when it was mild and a grazing muzzle or dry lot could have stopped it altogether. It is frustrating how little many professionals seem to know about founder and laminitis.
    ^^this! A major problem...vets and farriers know very little about it( of course there are exceptions).
    I remember well a young lady who had her horse PTS. She would not even look at alternative ways of treating, believed only her vets and farrier.
    Or the young man from Cyprus....Trinity will remember him, he came on here, asking for help for his pony which had foundered on all four. He was desperate, and willing to try anything. And this forum here came to his help, tele - coached him. Last he posted was pony was running around again......
    I just got my gelding back on his feet after a bout of laminitis, just with diet and proper trim. So it is not a death sentence.
    Wallaby likes this.
         
        07-09-2013, 02:27 PM
      #10
    Yearling
    Thankfully, if the farrier and vet are knowledgeable, most laminitus can be avoided. Laminitus is a management issue. Recognising the signs and risks in a particular horse before it happens and allieviating them is the best method of treatment. Always better to be proactive.

    I look at every horse as a case of laminitus waiting to happen. I evaluate impending risk.based on several factors and try to make changes as needed to keep the risk as low as possible. Everything affects risk percentages.... how we keep them, what they eat, breed, medical issues, age, vaccinations, deworming.sensitivity, weather changes, pasture changes...etc.etc. Horses at high risk due to inchangable thibgs like breed and age etc and especially with signs showing in the hoof of sub clinical laminitus should be watched like a hawk. If you know what to.look for, most.times, it can be avoided. Every horse should have the changeable risk factors lessened or eliminated ideally. But the first line of battle is knowing. Most people don't know how much they can affect risk by simply.making a few changes in their.horsekeeping and by keeping their horse at a good weight. Fat is actually worse than slightly thin for the horses health.
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