Pulled my boy's shoes tonight.
 
 

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Pulled my boy's shoes tonight.

This is a discussion on Pulled my boy's shoes tonight. within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • My horses shoe became loose one week before he was reset he started to get a little ouchey he got new shoes and now he is very lame

 
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    09-29-2013, 11:06 PM
  #1
Foal
Pulled my boy's shoes tonight.

So after basically a year of trying to keep shoes on my gelding out on pasture board, I ended up taking off his shoes tonight (or rather, he pulled one off himself, and the BO pulled the other for me after we talked with the farrier). My BO and I have kept up a constant stream of info about his shoes- if one of us spots a loose/ suspicious/ lost shoe we inform the other so we both are up to date on what the horse is doing to his feet. After the second lost shoe that we couldn't find (in two months) the farrier suggested keeping old shoes handy so if he couldn't make it to us quickly a local farrier could tack it back on. I never knew if he would have both shoes when I got him out of the pasture or what shape they would be in.

All that ended tonight. When I arrived and the BO told me that we were down a shoe again, I asked her thoughts on trying something, anything different that might work better. We were both thinking barefoot or glue on, given that his hoof wall is pretty thin, and he was just tearing up what he had. The farrier was called and consulted, and the decision was barefoot. Apparently he was barefoot with his last owner until she brought him in for training (same farrier) and looked pretty good when the farrier started working with him. So our plan is to see how he does without shoes for now. I know we are probably going to go through a crumbly nasty looking phase as he grows out unhealthy hoof, but I'm optimistic. All I know for sure at this time is that we are trying something else, and will assess as we go along.

EDIT: This is not a farrier rant or anything like that. My farrier is great, and addressing my horse as he needs to be. We are simply dealing with a horse with poor feet, and having tried one thing, now trying another.
     
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    09-30-2013, 01:30 AM
  #2
Trained
Hi,

If you're going to work the horse & he has such weak feet, chances are they will be too weak to cope bare on some surfaces at least. Hoof boots are a generally effective option for providing protection when needed.

I suggest you do some reading & learn about hoof form & function, to better understand what's going on & the effects of different approaches. For eg. I don't believe conventional rims *if well applied, well managed* are necessarily bad, but there are effects inherent to peripherally loading the walls which are problematic if long term, especially if the feet are already unhealthy. Also learning about diet & nutrition & what bearing this has on hooves is important. Bare Foot Horse Mayfield Barehoof Care Centre Home Page safergrass.org e-hoofcare.com are a few good sources to start you off.
     
    09-30-2013, 10:12 AM
  #3
Foal
Good info! Thanks Loosie. I have no preferences to barefoot vs. shod, I think it's more important to treat the individual horse. I'll take a look at all of that and learn what my horse needs.
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    09-30-2013, 10:51 AM
  #4
Trained
Is the horse on a hoof supplement?
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    09-30-2013, 11:20 AM
  #5
Yearling
I definitely recommend a hoof supplement. I feed both my boys Farriers Formula Double Strength.

Does he get sore soles? If so, I would also recommend Keratex. I started my TB on the FF and Keratex and his feet are looking phenomenal. Consult your farrier first, but I definitely love those two in combination with each other.
     
    09-30-2013, 07:08 PM
  #6
Foal
Yes, he's been on a hoof supplement for about 5 months now. We should be able to start seeing an improvement at the top of the hoof, but the bottom is old hoof from before we started. I've got my boy on SmartHoof right now, as most Smartpak supplements have worked quite well for me. I've read that it can take up to a year to see the whole hoof regrow and have the effect of the supplement, so I'm not expecting to see miracles yet. If the farrier isn't able to see a difference as the hoof continues to grow, then we'll look into something else.
     
    09-30-2013, 07:39 PM
  #7
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by xlionesss    
I definitely recommend a hoof supplement. I feed both my boys Farriers Formula Double Strength.

Does he get sore soles? If so, I would also recommend Keratex. I started my TB on the FF and Keratex and his feet are looking phenomenal. Consult your farrier first, but I definitely love those two in combination with each other.
No sole sores, he's never been lame a day. No abscesses or nasty cracks. He does have one small superficial crack running vertical on the left rear, but it is very shallow. We have had thrush plenty- mostly to do with the weather this year. Once when it was super nasty muddy at the start of summer he had some tough thrush and his right front frog was pretty bad. I got aggressive with iodine and thrush buster and it cleared on out. I've heard lots of good things about Keratex, I just haven't quite sold myself on the price. Farriers Formula will probably be my back up plan, if it seems the SmartHoof isn't working.

What's happening with his shoes is that his feet get crumbly at the nail holes, then the nails get loose. Once they are loose, we try to tighten or clamp them back down, but it's a only a matter of time until he gets them loose again. The shoe then tends to pull away on one side of his hoof (but still attached), and then bam! Lost/ twisted/ loose shoes and torn up feet. He doesn't over reach, and has never pulled a shoe off from behind- it's always side to side. He lives in bell boots now, which help some, but it's really fun to tear those up- don't you know? He managed to slice a bell boot off one day. No damage to himself, just a clean cut down the boot. He also crosses his legs trying to knock flies off. Frequently I will see him step on one front hoof with the other- not helping our situation any.

Big guy is on a regular six week schedule, but I've been wondering if shortening it down to four or five weeks would help? I wouldn't say that in shoes he was overdue or had to be reset right at six weeks, but if on occasion we hit anything longer than sever week that was much too long. That one week makes a big difference to me. Since I'm thinking that we are going to be seeing some ugly feet for the next few cycles at lest, I wonder if shorter cycles might help him stay more even and put less wear and tear on him? My biggest fear is that he will wear his feet uneven at first, and could aggravate his legs during this time. Since he's got bench knees I know uneven feet are a major potential hazard.
     
    09-30-2013, 09:58 PM
  #8
Trained
Smart hoof is great. I had my mare on a dose and a half and it took nine months but now her hooves are great. She is now on a regular dose.
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    09-30-2013, 10:35 PM
  #9
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by commonfish    
No sole sores, he's never been lame a day.
Well that's a good start. If he has thin walls, likely he has thin soles too though, so I'd consider having boots or such on hand for protection when needed, if you ride rough/hard trails.

Quote:
What's happening with his shoes is that his feet get crumbly at the nail holes, then the nails get loose.
This is commonly due to nutritional probs, &/or infection, but can be a symptom of generally unhealthy feet.

Quote:
Big guy is on a regular six week schedule, but I've been wondering if shortening it down to four or five weeks would help? I wouldn't say that in shoes he was overdue or had to be reset right at six weeks
Yes, leaving a horse too long isn't helpful, particularly if shod. But shod hooves tend to grow slower than unshod, so if 6 weeks was too long when shod, I'd definitely tighten the schedule. Particularly if you're wanting to 'correct' problems, it pays to do them little & often, rather than wait for them to overgrow before bringing them back.

Quote:
My biggest fear is that he will wear his feet uneven at first, and could aggravate his legs during this time. Since he's got bench knees I know uneven feet are a major potential hazard.
As with shod horses, feet need to be trimmed correctly *for the animal in question* So if they're trimmed to be 'well balanced' as per preconceived ideals, then they may well put undue strain on twisted legs. But if they were trimmed appropriately when shod & will be trimmed the same way, there shouldn't be any difference there. Did he wear his shoes seriously uneven at all?
     
    10-01-2013, 07:03 PM
  #10
Foal
Quote:
Well that's a good start. If he has thin walls, likely he has thin soles too though, so I'd consider having boots or such on hand for protection when needed, if you ride rough/hard trails.
Usually I ride in our arena, we have sadly lost access to some trails recently due to coyotes. Anything else I would need to trailer to and I don't have a trailer.


Quote:
This is commonly due to nutritional probs, &/or infection, but can be a symptom of generally unhealthy feet.
I have used FeedXL in the past to monitor his diet, and it's pretty else balanced, with too much protein our biggest challenge. Infection, I have not ever really thought about. The farrier has said horse's hoof walls have gotten thin lately, but that was thought to be a result of all the wet.


Quote:
Yes, leaving a horse too long isn't helpful, particularly if shod. But shod hooves tend to grow slower than unshod, so if 6 weeks was too long when shod, I'd definitely tighten the schedule. Particularly if you're wanting to 'correct' problems, it pays to do them little & often, rather than wait for them to overgrow before bringing them back.
Six weeks was fine, but much longer and that wasn't good. I will speak to the farrier to see if we can shorten the cycle though.


Quote:
As with shod horses, feet need to be trimmed correctly *for the animal in question* So if they're trimmed to be 'well balanced' as per preconceived ideals, then they may well put undue strain on twisted legs. But if they were trimmed appropriately when shod & will be trimmed the same way, there shouldn't be any difference there. Did he wear his shoes seriously uneven at all?
He doesn't wear his shoes unevenly, no- but if he looses a show sometimes it comes off unevenly, if that make sense? I have this fear because of that; that bare hooves might wear uneven, even if that's a bit of an unreasonable fear. We see our horses do so many odd things to themselves, I just have this case of sight irrational fears.
     

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