Question On Horses Hoof!
 
 

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Question On Horses Hoof!

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  • What do a horses hoofs look like if they are soar and what does a horse do when its feet hurt??
  • getting over fear of hind horse hooves

 
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    10-27-2010, 11:08 AM
  #1
Foal
Question On Horses Hoof!

Okay, I have this mare..... she wont let no one touch her Hoof but me.. and I don't know how to let other people to pick up her Hoof... I had a farrier come out to trim her Hoof BAM Kicked him..... Then after that she bolted away from him like a cougar is after her...... I am so confused... I had my cousin try to pick up her Hoof and see looked nervous, and then I tried calm as can be....

So, my question is how do I get her over her fear of letting other people pick up her Hoof's??
     
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    10-27-2010, 11:15 AM
  #2
Showing
Training, training, training. You have to let other people to communicate with the horse as much as possible (NOT to just pick the hoofs, but brush, work, feed, etc.). To me doesn't look like she's scared, but looks like total disrespect towards other people. When they scared they shy away for the most part, not kick at the person holding the hoof. If she won't let anyone else to touch her hoofs and you are around, I'm sorry, but she doesn't see you as a protection/leader.
     
    10-27-2010, 12:05 PM
  #3
Yearling
Kicking is an abo****e no-no. Did you mention to the farrier that she didn't like her feet picked up? Or was weary around strangers?

I know horses can be picky about strangers, but there is no excuse to act violently. They have sedatives that can temporarily work to calm horses who are bad about that. We used a sedative on my mom's horse when he was in pain due to a hoof problem so the farrier could easily fix the problem.

How long do you hold up this hoof? If you just pick it up for a few seconds, then set it down, how can you expect her to do the same for the farrier since he has to hold her hoof for minutes on end? Was he holding the foot when she kicked out? Or did she strike out before he could even hold on to it?

Does she offer to kick when people walk towards the back of her in general?
     
    10-27-2010, 03:37 PM
  #4
Foal
I did mention to the the farrier that she don't like her legs messed with.... And when he try to touch the front legs she automatically strikes at him with the back legs.. So, he did sedate her..... Now its fine and dandy tell he gets to the back left leg... Kicked him in the chest he kept on doing his job.. I do hold her hoof up for awhile multiple times a day.... Does she offer to kick when people walk towards the back of her in general? No, she don't..
     
    10-27-2010, 03:41 PM
  #5
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitten_Val    
Training, training, training. You have to let other people to communicate with the horse as much as possible (NOT to just pick the hoofs, but brush, work, feed, etc.). To me doesn't look like she's scared, but looks like total disrespect towards other people. When they scared they shy away for the most part, not kick at the person holding the hoof. If she won't let anyone else to touch her hoofs and you are around, I'm sorry, but she doesn't see you as a protection/leader.
Emphasis mine.

That is the crux of your issue.

Your horse needs to learn respect. Period.
     
    10-27-2010, 03:59 PM
  #6
Yearling
There are some farriers horses just don't like. Maybe this horse was injured in the past, and now associates farriers with pain? Sometimes if the farrier handles the horse roughly, they won't like it.

If the horse is generally calm, and let's other people see her feet, then she just might not have liked the farrier as a person.

I would work with her on getting her used to strangers handleing her, and call out a different farrier. She was so upset with him she was kicking out with her back feet just to try and get him. She was either just being disrespectful, or, she could have had a bad expierence in the past. She probably let's you mess with her feet becuase she trusts you, but not anyone else.

There are a lot of websites that explain how to pick up feet, and how to fix problem horses. Lots of books too. Jessica Jahiel's book "Horse Behavior Problem Solver" has some very good advice on horses have trouble with farriers.
     
    10-27-2010, 09:42 PM
  #7
Weanling
I would get some other people to just handle her. Start by brushing, tieing ect. And making sure that THEY don't let her get away with anything - if she does something they need to be boss and discipline her to get her to respect them. That way she should learn to understand that she has to behave for all.
     
    10-27-2010, 10:24 PM
  #8
Foal
Kitten_Val has pretty much hit the nail on the head. Training is key to your horse respecting you, and this seems like it is clearly a resect issue. If you've got a round pen, you should start using the daylights out of it. I have a OTTB, and I work him regularly in the round pen. Every time he starts to get a bit fresh with something I make him run and work him on figure eights. We use some other games to get him more focused on staying with me, but the bottom line is that he knows I'm his leader and protector. He will always look for an opportunity to assert himself as the leader, but as long as he knows I'm the leader, he will follow and respect me. This, more than any other single reason is the absolute need for good, solid, positive ground work.
     
    10-27-2010, 10:48 PM
  #9
Trained
Yep...your mare needs a crash course in RESPECT!!! And soon, before someone gets seriously injured...kicking is NEVER the right answer, nor acceptable.

If she seems nervous around other people, then you need to have other people handle her, and help her "get over it"...she needs to learn that you aren't the only person who will ever handle her in her lifetime.

Find a trainer who will work with her, and help you learn how to handle situations that arise, like when your farrier came out.

Honestly, if my mare had done that, I would have put her butt to work...hard. If she wanted to dork around, then fine, I will work her butt...not just lunging either; lots of direction changes, backing, sidepassing, hip and shoulder yielding...

The reason for putting the horse's feet to work, is to loosen up his mind...if you KNEW your horse was getting nervous, you allowed her to go from a thinking frame of mind, to a reactive one. If you notice her getting nervous around another person, just get her feet to move...just make sure you are controlling the direction; and don't just lunge, do lots of direction changes, and other constructive movements (yields, backing, flexing, etc).

Example...the other day, my mare decides my hubby is a scarey horse eater, and FREAKS out...snorting, backing, twitchy...well rather than force her to walk up to him, and potentially hurt all three of us. I just got her moving; at first I did some lunging with lots of direction changes (at the same time I had hubby stand in one place and do what he was doing when he "scared" the horse...he was waving at us!). When she started relaxing a bit, I then switched to sending her back and forth between hubby and I. When she calmed down further, I stopped her, and had him just walk back and forth waving and talking loud. When she licked her lips and cocked a hind leg, I had him stop, pet her, and then we started all over again (from the stand still). It took all of 5 minutes to take my mare from reacting, back to thinking about the situation.

If you can unlock your mares feet you can unlock her brain.
     
    10-28-2010, 05:48 AM
  #10
Foal
Alot of real good advice here!!!
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