Rasping tips/techniques/protocol?...
   

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Rasping tips/techniques/protocol?...

This is a discussion on Rasping tips/techniques/protocol?... within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Horse stubbing toes into ground cant walk uphill
  • Where can i buy a one handed hoof rasp

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    08-13-2012, 06:04 PM
  #1
Super Moderator
Rasping tips/techniques/protocol?...

Soooo I'm in a spot where it looks like I'm going to have to start either trimming my mare myself or at least doing serious hoof maintenance on her myself due to shenanigns on the part of all the farriers around.

The one I used to use was basically 100% slacking on her job (just a little rasping every 10 weeks to the tune of $35) and the one I'm currently using seems good but Lacey's feet are constantly chipping and they're obviously out of balance about 2 weeks post-trim.
I feel like, for $35 (new farrier charges the same as old farrier), the trim should last more than 2 weeks. This guy is reputed to be the best in the area...maybe he's the best for arena-bound horses and not for trail horses that wear hoof like crazy?
On top of that, Lacey grows/wears hoof slow/fast enough that when her feet OBVIOUSLY need rearranging, at 8 weeks, there's barely anything for the farrier to take off. He just nips a bit here, nips a bit there, runs a rasp over her feet, pares her sole a bit, and charges me $35
In any case, I'm pretty much fed up with it all.


I'm thinking, at least in the case of Lacey, I might be able to do a somewhat of a serviceable job, if only to stretch the visits out, since she grows hoof soooo slowly.


I did a little tiny bit of rasping today, just to even her front hooves out (her left front, instead of being totally rounded, it looked more like a circle someone tried to free-hand cut out of some paper, with one side rounded, the other side more square). I was pretty easily able to get the "problem" one (it seems to be just an issue of an unadressed flare going crazy) back in order, and I was able to smooth out the sharp bits sticking out from her right front (instead of chipping off, it had chipped/bent up and out) so I'm thinking that it probably wouldn't be too hard to do a little rasping every couple of weeks and keep things under control...


Anyway, are there certain things to keep in mind here? Certain "proper" ways of using a rasp?
I have absolutely no intention of using anything more major than a rasp, I don't have those skills. No hoof knife, no nippers. I don't want to give myself the tools to seriously mess anything up. The plan is to just remove snaggy things, major flaring, rounding the toes off when necessary, etc. Nothing too intense.


[I would just ask my farrier to help me but I asked him about it and he said that if I don't want to see chipping/have her hooves wear unevenly like they do, I should have him put shoes on Lacey and that doing anything between trims was totally unnecessary....so not going to get much help there...]


Thank you! :)
     
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    08-13-2012, 06:22 PM
  #2
Started
Quote:
[I would just ask my farrier to help me but I asked him about it and he said that if I don't want to see chipping/have her hooves wear unevenly like they do, I should have him put shoes on Lacey and that doing anything between trims was totally unnecessary....so not going to get much help there...]

ROFLMAO.... If he can't put a good strong bevel/roll on her hooves to keep them from chipping off then GO for it GIRL..
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    08-13-2012, 06:25 PM
  #3
Foal
Maybe something like this would help you?
     
    08-13-2012, 06:33 PM
  #4
Yearling
Good for you! I personally started out that way too, just beveling the edges so that they didn't chip. Just take it slow, you can always take more off, but you can't add hoof back ;) A few years later and I am the sole hoof care provider for my mare. :)
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    08-13-2012, 06:38 PM
  #5
Yearling
Man, after hearing about some of the problems people have with farriers, I think I need to start tipping mine better!
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    08-13-2012, 07:39 PM
  #6
Green Broke
I've watched two farriers work. The first one I knew did a terrible job because she always took next to nothing off the hoof and Luck was tripping constantly; before, after, in between, and anytime else. Her hooves were just too long, all the time.
Las week on Thursday I met ST's (and the herd's) farrier. He actually positioned each horse so that I could watch what he was doing, explained everything I did, explained his day to day work, and that he limits himself to 12 horses a day and is constantly turning people down. He finished each horse within 15-25 minutes (with and without shoes) and told me that he'd definitely send business my way when I finished my training and got all my tools.
I got to experience friendly conversation, all questions asked about various topics, and all-around a nice guy. The farrier for the previous barn was, to say the least..b*tchy. She didn't want to talk, was always short, and was rather slow (and she's been doing it longe than thus guy has). She'd whack the horse with her rasp, while he told me that he'll poke and "holler" at the horse, but it's not his job to correct problems and that's on the owner to do. I felt that was a great solution which kept him safe, and still gets him 2-3 people he has to turn down each week. If I decide to go farrier all the way and train on the side, I'm glad I have him as an acquaintance and that if I'm like him (I have the same views and attitude), I'll be set.
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    08-14-2012, 01:16 AM
  #7
Super Moderator
Thanks for the support guys! :)

ClaudiaD, that looks very interesting! I'm not a big "gimmick"-y stuff but that looks like it might be useful. I'll probably just stick with my rasp until something pushes me one way or another though, you know? :)

I'm jealous of you guys with fantastic farriers! I'm actually really really disappointed with my current guy. I asked around on my local horse board and he was, by far, the most recomended. Congrats on basically winning the lottery!
My current theory is that perhaps there's just not enough incentive for these hoof people (1st lady was a "barefoot trimmer", current guy is an actual farrier) to really do a good job. I mean, they come out to see a single horse who's ridiculously easy to trim (you don't even have to touch her for her to pick up her feet after the first hoof+she'll hold the hoof up herself for you, if you want!) and who doesn't do any sort of performing besides just being loveable+trail riding. If I were in their shoes, I knew I was going to be paid the lowest amount on my pay scale, and I had already had a tough day filled with super picky owners+testy horses, I might not do my best work. Of course, as the owner, I think they should be doing their best work always, but I can see it from their side too.


I think too, as Lacey gets more visually impaired+as arthritic changes occur more and more, there might come a point where she can't/won't tolerate a stranger hauling on her legs. At that point, it would be ideal to already have the know-how to do it myself. It would be ideal in any situation but yknow.

I'll hopefully be able to add some pictures to this thread tomorrow/the next day, just to see what you all think.
I did not take off much at all today, I just focused on following the white line/sole around and making the hoof wall run parallel to those things (the hoof wall had been verging outward in some areas, like I mentioned in the OP).


Excellent point AQHA13! ;) The rule of thumb over here is conservative! :)


I'm not sure how to do her back hooves because they are super super upright (just due to how she wears them - she drags them when walking dowhill, I assume in an attempt to kinda "feel" her way down since she stabs her front toes into the ground going uphill as well and both ways of going have become more pronounced as her sight has deteriorated) and, even though they're chippy too, I'm not sure how to "improve" them without going too far.... I'll post pictures tomorrow. :)
     
    08-14-2012, 02:18 AM
  #8
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wallaby    
I feel like, for $35 (new farrier charges the same as old farrier), the trim should last more than 2 weeks. This guy is reputed to be the best in the area... ...need rearranging, at 8 weeks, there's barely anything for the farrier to take off. He just nips a bit here, nips a bit there, runs a rasp over her feet, pares her sole a bit, and charges me $35
Assuming the farrier is doing a good job, it still depends on the state of the hooves, environment, growth, as to whether a 'touch up' every couple of weeks may well be in order. If her feet are so 'obviously' in need & the farrier needs nips by 8 weeks, then I'd respectfully consider that 8 weeks may be a bit long for her. It's not all about excess growth, but even slow growing or well worn hooves tend to get imbalanced. It's ideal if the hooves are trimmed frequently enough to keep them maintained, rather than allow too much overgrowth before trimming... tho I appreciate the 'real world'.

So... I reckon great learn to do it yourself if you're keen. Just remember there's no great rush & I wouldn't let go of a good farrier's services in a hurry. I suggest you keep learning the theory & principles - I know you already have some knowledge there - and I'd suggest if possible you do get some hands on lessons or attend a workshop at least. If your farrier's not willing, perhaps there's another around the traps worth asking, or for the worth of a few lessons, you may consider travelling for it. Otherwise if none of that's possible, I reckon Pete Ramey's DVD set is pretty informative.

If you start out doing what you are doing, just 'brushing up' between trims & get the farrier out every 6-8 weeks for a while, you can't go very wrong & you'll get the feel of the job first. As for the farrier believing shoes are the only answer to chipping, well, he may even

Quote:
Anyway, are there certain things to keep in mind here? Certain "proper" ways of using a rasp?
Buy a good rasp(tho for starters an old one is prob for the best). Relax & allow the rasp to do the work, don't try to force it. Rasp around the circumference when doing flares & 'roll' & use the most of the rasp blade where possible, rather than perpendicular to the sole in short blows. If you have a double sided rasp(as opposed to rasp/file), make the most of the finer side. Oh & don't let it get damp if poss & look after it, don't rasp nails, gravel, mud, etc - they get rusty & blunt quite easily.
     
    08-14-2012, 10:07 AM
  #9
Started
For further education and help for those who want or need to do their own horses this group is an awesome bunch of dedicated barefoot people.. They are great at helping with almost any issue. They can even tell you the best way to get pics so you get great help..
barefoothorsecare : Barefoot Horse Care
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    08-14-2012, 11:46 AM
  #10
Weanling
We are just starting to do our own horses as we can't find anyone in our area who will do a true natural barefoot trim. We really like this website and have learned a lot from it.
Bare Foot Horse
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