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Removing toe callus when trimming

This is a discussion on Removing toe callus when trimming within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Toe callus on hoof good or bad?

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    07-24-2013, 10:15 PM
  #31
Weanling
I was doing 3 rides/week in good footing: a dressage lesson, dressage schooling in a nice arena, and a short trail ride over soft dirt in the woods. She was holding up to that well, but the vet wants her on rest again. He agreed I could hand walk or lunge her, so I may pony her down the trail with my other horse. I'll just have to be careful to only use trails with good footing and not push her to walk faster than is comfortable.

Thanks for the advice about shoes. I'm hoping to be able to work WITH the vet to find something we can agree on. I think a pour in pad sounds like it would help with her comfort and support. I've got some more research to do it looks like. Nails were bad for her previously, but we haven't tried shoes at all in a long time.

Also, I heard back on the thyroid panel and it was normal, so the vet thinks she is just IR. I must need to look at her diet a little more closely.
     
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    07-24-2013, 11:01 PM
  #32
Banned
If she's IR deit is very important have to have low NSC tested hay. No kind of grain like oats corn or any other grain. Some horses can't handle grass either so that might be a big NO.NO. I know all this to well my horse is IR and I have found out he has a lot of triggers for his laminitis attacks.

Been through one right after another now I finally have his deit in order he will hopefully improve. He's been lame now most of the summer with bouts of laminitis. I will be putting him on the supplement heiro its made for IR horses. So I can let you know how it works.
     
    07-24-2013, 11:14 PM
  #33
Weanling
Her diet is already low NSC as far as I know, and she was getting Quiessence, but FeedXL indicated she needed more vitamin E, so we went to SmartControl IR since it has extra vit. E. She also gets a multivitamin since she only gets hay year round. I'm just trying to figure out if there's something I'm missing. The vet is thinking maybe her dry lot is too big and she's getting the leaves off bushes, or something. We're soaking our new hay since it isn't tested yet, but I'm hoping it is low enough NSC without soaking. That is such a PITA. This whole process is frustrating. I'll have to look in to the heiro supplement. Do you know what is in it?
     
    07-25-2013, 12:26 AM
  #34
Trained
Insulin Resistance | Equine MedicalEquine Medical

Tons of info on that site about feeding, testing, etc. It's the Heiro site. If the link shouldn't work, just click on ' articles' on their HP.
     
    07-25-2013, 01:29 AM
  #35
Yearling
How is her weight? Is her crest hard? IR can be such a bummer to manage. My good friend graveled her entire barn yard and had to keep her mare in there 24 7 with soaked slow feed hay. Drove her nuts as she had all this beautiful grass her poor horse couldnt eat and she had to mow.

Regular excercize is so important for IR horses. Daily riding for at least an hour and keeping their weight down so the crest of the neck is soft to the feel really helps. I do not understand why you would rest the horse that is not actively foundering or lame after a time of adjustment to whatever change you make to her feet. Imo, id ride depending on her comfort level. Far better to keep regular excercize imo unless she is unsound. Ponying is a good compromise.
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    07-25-2013, 10:37 AM
  #36
Weanling
Her weight is healthy, but she is cresty. The crest is not as hard as it used to be. She's on a dry lot and I'm soaking the new hay, so it's the same kind of deal. :(

Just heard back from specialist--she and the vet both want to do a roller rocker shoe. Cue an argument. It just sounds like it will take my comfortable, mostly sound horse and make her miserable. :(
     
    07-25-2013, 11:17 AM
  #37
Trained
I've had 2 laminitic horses. One who never had more than just a little discomfort and one who rotated 7 or 8 degrees on her left fore and 14 on her right fore. She had a severe onset and rotated within hours. She spent 10 days in the ICU at OSU and at one point, I had actually said to put her down. We gave her 24 more hours to get up again and she surprised us all and did.

She was never ever shod. I was always very careful of her diet but learned over time that especially mares, will have flare ups occasionally, due to hormone fluctuations. No matter how careful I was of her diet, trimming and such she would flare, spring and fall. Fall usually not as bad as spring and the vet at OSU said it had to do with her hormones. She was 16 when she foundered and 26 when I finally had to put her down. By the time I put her down, you could feel the tip of her coffin bone through her sole and it was only a matter of time. I kept expecting that the farrier would say that each time was the last when he came out.

Unfortunately, she had an accident and cut her good leg to the bone very badly and was going to have to be stalled and bear a lot of weight on her bad leg for an extended period of time, so I made the decision to let her go. I didn't think fixing the wound on her one leg and forcing the bad leg to get worse so that it would hasten the descent of the coffin bone sounded like a very good idea for an old horse.

In the beginning, we put boots and frog support pads on her and after a while we trimmed so she was comfortable. I never rode her again and never bred her again, just retired her and would turn her out in the arena with her friends so she could exercise but not graze.
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    07-25-2013, 12:05 PM
  #38
Yearling
Hormonal issues causing flareups is a good thought. I wonder how spaying mares like this might affect that? Something to ask the vet.
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    07-25-2013, 12:16 PM
  #39
Weanling
That might also be why herbs like chaste berry and raspberry leaves are often suggested, too. I know that they can affect hormones in humans. I wonder if the depo shot for horses might help that also?
     
    07-25-2013, 12:35 PM
  #40
Yearling
I have noticed a trend of IR/lamninitus issues in mares over geldings around me. I currently know several obese and cresty geldings with near perfect feet against all odds but all the mares I know except one with body fat/crests like that have issues with laminitus to some degree. Circumstantial but noteworthy considering the numbers.
     

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