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Ridges on Hooves?

This is a discussion on Ridges on Hooves? within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Ridges on all 4 hooves, should I be concerned
  • Growth ridges in horse hooves

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    02-05-2013, 05:25 AM
  #21
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaphyJaphy    
I've done a bit of research on the term "fever rings" and I found that the ridges I've described can be caused by any major change in the horses environment, including feed and new ownership. Basically anything that causes stress. This makes more sense than laminitis, ....She's not sore and has never come up lame,
Japhy, 'fever rings', 'growth rings', founder rings'... etc are all descriptions for changes in the hoof due to laminitis. The causes you describe above are indeed some of the triggers/causes of laminitis. With any luck, if the horse is truly not at all sore & triggers & mechanics have been addressed, you can call it 'low grade' or 'sub clinical' laminitis & with good management, the horse will never suffer any more major symptoms than that.
     
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    02-05-2013, 05:33 AM
  #22
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie    
Japhy, 'fever rings', 'growth rings', founder rings'... etc are all descriptions for changes in the hoof due to laminitis. The causes you describe above are indeed some of the triggers/causes of laminitis. With any luck, if the horse is truly not at all sore & triggers & mechanics have been addressed, you can call it 'low grade' or 'sub clinical' laminitis & with good management, the horse will never suffer any more major symptoms than that.
Thanks very much for the clarification loosie! I came across all those terms and the distinctions were blurry at best. I was reading about sub-clinical laminitis in a veterinary book I've got, but it only used the term "founder rings". Whatever the cause, she's obviously displaying a symptom. Her feet aren't even close to the picture walk posted, but it was enough for me to notice. I wish I could show you guys, just for the heck of it.

All I can say is, if I end up taking her one she's going to have a major adjustment to her care routine.
     
    02-05-2013, 06:59 PM
  #23
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by walkinthewalk    
I didn't post it for critique, I posted it merely to show the OP a first-hand example of founder rings as opposed to looking at them on a web site.
I apologize for offending you. I was not offering a critique of the hoof, but since there was a photo of a hoof with pressure ridges I was using it as an illustration since that was the question asked. My explanation was meant to describe why a hoof with a tall heel would have ridges at the back of the hoof (because that's the tallest part of the hoof wall, so it receives the most pressure from the ground).

You can call the hoof whatever you want, and if the term club is offensive I am sorry to have used it. What matters is only that you understand how to correct the hoof's deformities. The so-called "club" hoof is just another deformity. I have researched all the latest research on club hooves extensively and looked at many x-rays. Inside many of them look just like a foundered hoof, because the overly tall heel pushes up the back of the internal foot and the capsule becomes detached from the coffin bone.

Back to the question of the ridges. No, the hoof wall is not softer just because it is pushed up. Imagine if you attached a solid piece of wood to the end of your finger. As your fingernail grew, it could either pull away from the nail bed, push up into your cuticle, split in two or else begin to ripple as it grew so more of it would fit in the space. If your diet encouraged better nail growth, these problems would intensify until you removed the wood or trimmed the nail off.
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    02-05-2013, 09:35 PM
  #24
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by gottatrot    
Inside many of them look just like a foundered hoof, because the overly tall heel pushes up the back of the internal foot
Yes, or constant toe pressure causes the bone to 'sink' & 'rotate'. It doesn't just look like a foundered foot, it essentially is one. Same with feet that are jacked up with wedges to 'treat' navicular & such - they tend to end up foundered with 'rotation'.

BUT **depending on cause & management options**, I don't think it's appropriate to just cut down heels & 'fix' angles. I think in many cases the best approach may be just managing what you've got - eg. Keeping heels from getting longer, keeping toes backed, using frog supports so the receded heels get some stimulation, if/when toe sole becomes too thin, padding it or applying 'laser tips' or such for more protection.
     
    02-05-2013, 09:46 PM
  #25
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by gottatrot    

Back to the question of the ridges. No, the hoof wall is not softer just because it is pushed up. Imagine if you attached a solid piece of wood to the end of your finger. As your fingernail grew, it could either pull away from the nail bed, push up into your cuticle, split in two or else begin to ripple as it grew so more of it would fit in the space. If your diet encouraged better nail growth, these problems would intensify until you removed the wood or trimmed the nail off.
Sorry if I wasn't very clear before in regards to the ridges being caused by "softer" hoof wall. "Softer" wasn't the correct word to use. I was just thinking that the ridges were caused by inconsistent quality of growth, which would pertain more to diet than to farrier care.

So are the ridges caused by diet, or lack of proper hoof care, or both? I've seen horses with well-maintained feet have bouts of laminitis and ending up with the same sort of thing, so I'm just wondering about that.
     
    02-06-2013, 01:32 AM
  #26
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaphyJaphy    
So are the ridges caused by diet, or lack of proper hoof care, or both? I've seen horses with well-maintained feet have bouts of laminitis and ending up with the same sort of thing
Yes, all of the above & I also should clarify that yes, hooves can suffer ridges on hooves that are definitely not due to imbalance/bad mechanics, so while I agree basically with Gotta, that's not the only reason - IME rings & ridges aren't as prominent if there aren't mechaincal issues though.

Rings, ridges, overlong hoof capsules, stretched laminae, etc are all signs of laminitic stress. This can be caused from a wide range of things. Typically it's diet related, but can be due to other gut probs, toxins or drugs, mechanics... basically any physical or even severe mental stress.

Laminitic 'events' can be very minor, with no other obvious signs that light 'growth rings', through to flaring/stretching, 'sensitive on hard surfaces', etc. This sort of degree has been generally disregarded until recently & not recognised as laminitis, however these days people are starting to recognise it as 'low grade' or 'sub clinical' laminitis. Of course, laminits/founder can also be extreme - major inflammation, pain & damage evident in 'acute' cases, to major deformity and damage of the pedal bone due to chronic laminitis(untreated, long term).
     
    02-06-2013, 02:57 PM
  #27
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie    

Laminitic 'events' can be very minor, with no other obvious signs that light 'growth rings', through to flaring/stretching, 'sensitive on hard surfaces', etc. This sort of degree has been generally disregarded until recently & not recognised as laminitis, however these days people are starting to recognise it as 'low grade' or 'sub clinical' laminitis. Of course, laminits/founder can also be extreme - major inflammation, pain & damage evident in 'acute' cases, to major deformity and damage of the pedal bone due to chronic laminitis(untreated, long term).
Thanks for the clarifications. From your description, the look of her hooves (and the way she is cared for), and what I've read in veterinary textbooks, it really looks like a case of sub-clinical laminitis. I'll make sure the vet takes a look when they come!

So now my next questions (since I may be leasing/buying this mare):

1. Is it always a bad idea to buy a horse with a history of laminitis? I'm planning on showing her (very small scale), using her for trail riding, and for hunting (not fox hunting). Does a history of laminitis mean she could come up lame more easily, as well as have relapses more easily?

2. How difficult is it to care for a previously laminitic horse, really? I know that it's pretty straightforward in theory but I'm wondering if there are any "hidden" factors I might have to take care of that I haven't thought of yet.

I'm going to talk to the vet about all this, and get a PPE regardless, but the vets in our area tend to not be very experienced with horses in general.
     

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