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She has funny feets.

This is a discussion on She has funny feets. within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Horse uneven coronet band
  • Uneven coronet band in horses

 
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    03-07-2012, 11:30 PM
  #11
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Horseman56    
The photos present a great educational opportunity for forum readers.
Bonus hint for any farriers/trimmers who attended the American Farrier's Association Convention in Mobile, Alabama last week. Dr. Reddin discussed at length this same subject/problem.

Cheers,
Mark
I have 2 questions. Would you try to fix a 10 yr old horses cowhocked ness? And someone told me that they would worry about taking a cowhocked horse trail riding due to the increased risk of injury to the horse and rider? I posted a thread in the trail riding section and I have pictures up as well. It would be appreciated thanks
     
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    03-07-2012, 11:45 PM
  #12
Banned
Iam no expert on hoofs but those back hoofs look like their serously out of balance the hair line at cornary band is uneven. Id be finding a qualified farrier to fix those hoofs.
     
    03-07-2012, 11:47 PM
  #13
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachel1786    
I'm not a farrier or trimmer but does this horse have a bit of a club foot?
And we have a winner!

Yes, both fronts are clubbed. They are not your typical club feet and bear more scrutiny.

The give-away is the slight bulge at the coronary just above the dorsal wall. A hoof free of pathology will have an indentation at the coronary (called the coronary groove). A club will invariably have a bulge at the dorsal aspect of the coronary, accompanying the upright wall seen in these photos.

So why are these clubbed feet somewhat unusual? Because we don't see the more common, strong and straight up heel growth indicative of the functionally shortened deep digital musculotendonous structures. Instead, this horse presents weak, medial/lateral flaring at the quarters. One can already see the stress placed on the central sulcus as the heels bulbs separate under that stress.

The bulging wall quarters suggest significant stress in this area. Sidebone is a possibility but I would want to see both lateral and d/p radiographs before speculating further.

This would be a very interesting horse to work on but is not a case wherein I'd offer protocol counsel via internet. I'd want to see this one in person before making specific recommendations.

To the owner; my comments are not meant to imply a serious pathology or mechanical failure at this point but I would recommend you ask your father to engage a professional farrier to better evaluate your horses needs. While I understand your locale may present a shortage of competent farriers, it would be worthwhile to do what you can to find some assistance. That may mean trailering your horse.

Cheers,
Mark
     
    03-07-2012, 11:53 PM
  #14
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by spirit88    
Iam no expert on hoofs but those back hoofs look like their serously out of balance the hair line at cornary band is uneven. Id be finding a qualified farrier to fix those hoofs.
I have switched farriers and this one wants to shoe her. He thinks that he can straighten them out a bit but never completly to what they should be. So you wouldn't worry about it being too late to help her? I don't want to make it worse or cause her pain by trying to change them.
     
    03-08-2012, 12:15 AM
  #15
Foal
I don't think you'll cause her long-term pain by trying to fix them. As she's under 6 everything is not completely "set in stone" and I think it would be worth the attempt. It might cause a bit of discomfort as she gets used to the shoes and the adjustments they cause but think of them like orthopedic shoes, uncomfortable at first but beneficial in the long run.

What you don't want is uneven pressure on the hooves which can cause permanent damage not only to your horse's feet but her legs too. Remember the saying "no hoof, no horse". I'm going to be shelling out between $140 and $170 for my ponies shoes this year so that she's shot to perfection and drilled and tapped for eventing. It is expensive but I'd rather pay that then have her joints prematurely wear out due to improper angles (my ponie's problem is her toes that grow like 5 times faster than her heels). I hope this inspires you to "bite the bullet" a little bit, I know I did the moment my vet said "she could have hock and knee damage if her angles aren't fixed".
     
    03-08-2012, 12:24 AM
  #16
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by yourcolorfuladdiction    
I don't think you'll cause her long-term pain by trying to fix them. As she's under 6 everything is not completely "set in stone" and I think it would be worth the attempt. It might cause a bit of discomfort as she gets used to the shoes and the adjustments they cause but think of them like orthopedic shoes, uncomfortable at first but beneficial in the long run.
Seriously?
     
    03-08-2012, 12:43 AM
  #17
Foal
I'm working under the assumption that she's got an educated farrier that knows what they're doing. If that's a wrong assumption and he's nailing shoes to the horses knees then I retract the statement, horse shoe nails in knee joints will cause lasting damage. But what the horse would need is basically corrective shoeing, which is what orthopedic shoes are. And making minor adjustments to the horse are still possible, not like a foal I'm not saying that fixing the clubbing is possible. But making it comfortable is.

And it's not uncommon for a horse who gets solid corrective shoeing to need bute for a few days because it's different (or so the Olympic vet that works on my horse says). But there's a big difference between pain from bad shoeing and soreness from having to walk more correctly.
     
    03-08-2012, 03:25 AM
  #18
Trained
Quote:
Okay... so.... all of this means what exactly?
For starters it means horseman doesn't care whether anyone understands him, just that he likes to use big words!

In plain language, subluxation means partial dislocation. Congenital means the horse was born with it. The distal-interphalangeal(DIP) joint is the lower pastern joint - the joint that joints the pedal bone to the next one up. Anterior means to the front, as does dorsal, when talking hooves.

Horseman I'm presuming you're talking about the broken forward pastern axis on the right? Please explain what you're seeing exactly - plain english would help, so the OP can follow the discussion without a translator. I agree that the area of the DIP joint does indeed look off, - the sidebone's reasonably clear too. But I know camera angle, the way the horse is standing, etc can affect how things appear, which is why I said I was reserving judgement on that until more info.

What makes you think any sublu.... I mean dislocation that may be present is something the horse was born with? Please explain how you think that could be known?
     
    03-08-2012, 03:32 AM
  #19
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by yourcolorfuladdiction    
I don't think you'll cause her long-term pain by trying to fix them. As she's under 6 everything is not completely "set in stone" and I think it would be worth the attempt. It might cause a bit of discomfort as she gets used to the shoes and the adjustments they cause but think of them like orthopedic shoes, uncomfortable at first but beneficial in the long run.
You must have misread the book on equine skeletal development! That far down the leg, 6 months is just about 'set in stone' & 6 years is close to skeletal maturity of the whole horse!
     
    03-08-2012, 03:06 PM
  #20
Foal
LOL! Well, I blew that one bigtime! Got ahead of myself and didn't state the obvious. Congenital club foot is actually quite rare and this one is not a severe degree of club foot and there is room for improvement, but a professional farrier with xrays in hand are a must.

One has the first 3 months of a foal's life for any positive prognosis on changing the bones. By 6 months, a positive prognosis is very much diminished. I've seen a treatment in a clinical setting where they injected the joint with a form of tetracycline, then casted with some success, but only attempted at a very early age.



I've also seen an interesting trim done where the hoof wall is a gentle curve from heel to toe, coaxing better weight bearing at the heels, maximum height at the toe quarters and continues on for good breakover, like a rocker trim and coaxing better mechanism on such a foot. Any thoughts?
     

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