short trim/tender feet
   

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short trim/tender feet

This is a discussion on short trim/tender feet within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Trimming horse feet too short
  • Ferrier trim to short how long to grwow hoof back

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    05-23-2012, 07:08 AM
  #1
Weanling
short trim/tender feet

My gelding was trimmed a couple weeks ago, it was the shortest I have ever seen him trimmed and I mentioned this to the farrier. My farrier also fits and sells hoof boots so I had that done and purchased a pair. ( I previously informed him that I wanted the boots the week before). Yesterday I rode 7.7 miles and he did well, after I got through the last part of the trail with gravel I took the boots off and rode the rest of the way home barefoot. Both feet on the bulbs had soft white spots. When we got to the driveway of the property he was very tender. I am not sure if the boots caused it or the short trim. Getting him back to the pasture there a some gravel in the dirt and he was very noticeably sore.
I am not sure if it was the boots or the short trim that caused him to sore or a combination. A fellow boarder offered a product called Horseman's something??, but he said it hardens the hooves. Has anyone used this and would it indeed be helpful? Thank you very much!
     
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    05-23-2012, 09:27 AM
  #2
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by garlicbunny    
Horseman's something??, but he said it hardens the hooves. Has anyone used this and would it indeed be helpful? Thank you very much!
Perhaps. Depends on what the horseman's "something" is.

From my perspective, the "something" would have been called "Farrier Service" and included a set of properly fit shoes intended to prevent a domesticated horse in use from going lame.

Cheers,
Mark
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    05-23-2012, 01:36 PM
  #3
Green Broke
The most common generic hardening products used are iodine and Venice turpentine.
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    05-23-2012, 06:04 PM
  #4
Trained
Horseshoer's Secret? That is a very popular feed through to help with strengtheneing hooves, but it takes months to do anything, and doesn't sound like it would directly help your problem.

You say you mentioned this short trim to your farrier. What was your farrier's response? If it was, "I screwed up and over trimmed your horse, but let me sell you these nifty hoof boots", I'd be looking for a new farrier.

Do you have any pics of your horse's feet? If the farrier went too short, it's possible he rasped off some live sole and toe callus. No way to know without pics. Is your horse normally fine barefoot prior to this trim?

To toughen the soles, Farrier's Fix Hoof Oil, Durasole and Venice Turpentine all can provide some relief. Best thing short term is either hoof boots or shoes.
     
    05-23-2012, 07:57 PM
  #5
Trained
Hi,

While it seem that many farriers are in the habit of trimming 'too short', in that they rasp too much from the ground surface of the foot, including into the sole, just because it was the shortest trim you've seen your horse get, doesn't make it 'too short'. Pics would be helpful to see what has been done.

So it sounds like your horse was fine for 2 weeks? Did you ride much then? Use the boots? How does your horse usually do bare? He did fine for the ride yesterday, but by the end of the ride, after you rode him bare for a period, including over gravel, he became sore. Have you considered that it may have been that, rather than boots or short trim that made him lame? Need more infor for more than speculation.
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    05-26-2012, 12:41 PM
  #6
Weanling
Venice Turpentine is used to harden hooves quickly. It's usually used after a trim on barefoot horses, and whenever it's needed. (Don't use it more than two days in a row or the hooves become much too hard). I'd suggest getting a jar and puttinng that on. Use a bit on his heels once a week til they toughen up.
Iodine is also used as a hoof hardener and can be used daily on the sole. It does kill cells though, so try not to get much on the frog/other places.
Horses sometimes need to get used to boots. My mare gets rubbed in the heels with Easyboots, but that's because they fit so tightly. If I used them often, her heels woulld toughen up.
I prefer boots like Old Macs. Boas cause pressure bruises, so don't go down that route, unless that dial is way below the coronary band. Cavellos are nice as well, though I haven't used them as much. I like Easyboot Gloves/Epics, though I don't it them tightly. My mare used to wear them daily when her hooves were bruising each spring.
     
    06-01-2012, 07:26 AM
  #7
Weanling
Thank you all! The product is Horsemans Secret and I found out I had some after I purchased the Venice Turpentine which I have not used yet. We rode 20 miles in 4 days with boots on him and he did just fine. Last day we rode was Monday and Wed he came up lame. BO called and said she took a stone from the outer edge of his hoof. He was so sore he didnt even want to move, I soaked it and he did seem better after that. I see no puncture or anything like that, just a space where the rock was.

He has always been somewhat sensitive but seems so much worse since the last trim. I have a call into the vet so should talk to him today and will try to get a hold of my farrier as well (it was too late for vet). Am hoping he will be better today... my farrier is very good and caring (we actually have 2 farriers and love both of them). It just seems since he does well with the boots that it has to be the trim and then the rock just made it unbearable.
So should I keep soaking his foot and or put one of the products we were talking about on.
A comment was made why did I take the boots off and ride him without for the last leg of the trip. There was no more gravel spots when I took them off until I got back to the barn..you know loose sparse gravel pieces in driveway and the path to his pasture was actually the worst.
It's probably too late for pic's isn't it since its been 3 weeks I think. He has had shoes a couple years ago before he bowed his tendon, I just really wanted to keep him barefoot..as I hear it is better for the horses hooves and because of the exspense. The costs of the boots is much only a little more than the cost of shoes. In the end though I will do what is best for my boy..no question on that! Thanks again!
     
    06-02-2012, 12:01 AM
  #8
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by garlicbunny    
BO called and said she took a stone from the outer edge of his hoof. He was so sore he didnt even want to move, I soaked it and he did seem better after that.
If there is a space or the hoof is soft enough that gravel can get jammed into the white line, that's a problem for starters. Sounds likely either that gravel or a stone bruise or such has caused an abscess. Is he still sore now or over it? If still lame, soaking in epsom salts can help, by softening the horn, reducing swelling & drawing infection. I wouldn't force a lame horse to walk, but I wouldn't lock him up & prevent it either - the more exercise the better generally, so long as it's not over gravel or such to risk further bruising/damage.

Quote:
He has always been somewhat sensitive but seems so much worse since the last trim. ....It just seems since he does well with the boots that it has to be the trim and then the rock just made it unbearable.
Of course it could be the trim. You've used the same farriers for some time & he's usually sorer post trim or not? How frequently does he get trimmed? Is there usually space for gravel between sole & horn or is this new? If not new, is the farrier addressing the separation?

But the second statement you made above doesn't add up to me. You seem to be saying because he does well with protection, that means that the trim must be at fault if he doesn't do well without. If I were into pedicures & wearing shoes, if I then took off my shoes & ran barefoot, I wouldn't think it was the most rational conclusion that my pedicurist must be at fault because I got sore feet. Especially 2 weeks later.

Quote:
A comment was made why did I take the boots off and ride him without for the last leg of the trip. There was no more gravel spots when I took them
Gravel's not the only place protection may be necessary. Depending on the state of his feet & the environment he lives vs the ground he was on, any hard ground could be too much for him. And any gravel - be it driveway or elsewhere could be a problem. 'Seedy toe' infection in the separated 'white line' & other mechanical stresses could also have caused the lameness & suspected abscess even in absence of gravel & bruising. Without pics & more info can only speculate.

Quote:
It's probably too late for pic's isn't it since its been 3 weeks I think. He has had shoes a couple years ago before he bowed his tendon, I just really wanted to keep him barefoot..as I hear it is better for the horses hooves and because of the exspense.
Too late to tell if the farrier pared sole or frog unnecessarily which may have caused him to be sore. Pics immediately post trim are necessary for that sort of thing. But not too late for pics at all if you want some specific opinions.

I personally do think shoeless(not nec always bare, depending on state of feet, etc) is definitely *generally* better for the horse. But while I'm all for it, I think it's important to make an informed decision about it & weigh up the pros & cons & alternatives of either, as well as understand the principles & factors that effect soundness, so you can be proactive - because it's not at all just a matter of whether the horse is shod or not, getting a good trimmer. On the note of expense, yes, depending on how much you pay for a trim in your area, it can indeed be cheaper, but that shouldn't be the deciding factor, as the wrong 'cheaper' choices can ultimately be much more expensive when they cause things to go awry.

So interested to see some pics & more info(diet, etc) if you want to share.
     
    06-02-2012, 02:31 AM
  #9
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck    
You say you mentioned this short trim to your farrier. What was your farrier's response? If it was, "I screwed up and over trimmed your horse, but let me sell you these nifty hoof boots", I'd be looking for a new farrier.
That's some funny stuff! Oh, and don't forget to factor in the cost of the vet.

That trim is getting more expensive by the ride.

Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie    
I personally do think shoeless(not nec always bare, depending on state of feet, etc) is definitely *generally* better for the horse.
Better??? The ladie's horse is lame! Just exactly how much and for how long does an animal have to suffer in pain before you admit that maybe, just maybe.... a horse needs a pair of shoes?

Quote:
But while I'm all for it, I think it's important to make an informed decision about it & weigh up the pros & cons & alternatives of either, as well as understand the principles & factors that effect soundness, so you can be proactive - because it's not at all just a matter of whether the horse is shod or not, getting a good trimmer.
Oh, I see. The answer is... some convoluted collection of dogma nonsense that does nothing for the owner or the horse!

To the OP... hire a REAL farrier and get your horse some relief before these barefoot fanatics do some serious damage to your animal.

Cheers,
Mark
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    06-02-2012, 09:00 PM
  #10
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Horseman56    
Better??? The ladie's horse is lame! Just exactly how much and for how long does an animal have to suffer in pain before you admit that maybe, just maybe.... a horse needs a pair of shoes?
Grow up Mark! It's a pity that while you do seem to have some good knowledge & experience, you just seem incapable of reasonable & rational discussion(or at very least, remain polite) about alternative approaches & can't seem to say anything without at least some snide comments.

Why do you have to try to make me appear that I leave horses to suffer just because I don't think shoes are necessarily the best option??? The animal should not have to 'suffer' at all. Just exactly how much time do horses have to put up with your own 'dogma' before you work out that maybe, just maybe there can be better alternatives to metal peripheral loading devices in every situation??
     

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