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Sore feet. Are her feet being trimmed properly?

This is a discussion on Sore feet. Are her feet being trimmed properly? within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Extra copper for barefoot performance horses
  • What is the best for hooves yea sacc or. brewers yeast

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    12-20-2012, 09:26 PM
  #21
Yearling
That all she is eating? No supplements or balancers?
     
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    12-21-2012, 04:11 PM
  #22
Foal
Yup. It is very good quality alfalfa and good quality timothy grass mix (my dad has been in the hay/straw business for over 30 years so I feed what we grow). She has access to free choice minerals ( Hoffmans Performance Horse Mineral ) as well as salt. Between the forage and minerals, I am confident that she is getting what she needs.

This topic has made me curious however and once the holidays are over, I plan on getting both the alfalfa and grass tested to see what the actual content is.

What should I all test for? Someone mentioned copper and zinc, but what else is a must know when getting feed tested?
     
    12-21-2012, 04:21 PM
  #23
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by KateS    
Yup. It is very good quality alfalfa and good quality timothy grass mix (my dad has been in the hay/straw business for over 30 years so I feed what we grow). She has access to free choice minerals ( Hoffmans Performance Horse Mineral ) as well as salt. Between the forage and minerals, I am confident that she is getting what she needs.

This topic has made me curious however and once the holidays are over, I plan on getting both the alfalfa and grass tested to see what the actual content is.

What should I all test for? Someone mentioned copper and zinc, but what else is a must know when getting feed tested?
Here is a recent thread on alfalfa Phoenixhorse :: Log in . Barefooters in the UK often feed linseed (flax), magnesium oxide, brewers yeast, salt and maybe extra copper or zinc depending upon forage analysis. Sometimes yea sacc instead of brewers yeast. These things you will see suggested a great deal on our forums and barefoot discussions.
     
    12-21-2012, 05:14 PM
  #24
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clava    
Here is a recent thread on alfalfa Phoenixhorse :: Log in . Barefooters in the UK often feed linseed (flax), magnesium oxide, brewers yeast, salt and maybe extra copper or zinc depending upon forage analysis. Sometimes yea sacc instead of brewers yeast. These things you will see suggested a great deal on our forums and barefoot discussions.
I'll take a look at that thread.

The one thing that I have noticed from the bit of research I have done, is that the hay in the UK in general seems to have less minerals in it than ours does here. Not necessarily in all cases just something that I read.

Out here we have alot of people that feed just an alfalfa grass mix, or pure alfalfa. Obviously some people believe that alfalfa isn't good for a horse but with talking to different people, I am totally confident with continuing with my half and half mix. The key is to not feed the richest alfalfa as I believe that it would be way too much for a horse, would just go to waste.

But if the test shows that there is something missing, I will definitely be supplementing my girl.
Clava likes this.
     
    12-25-2012, 03:21 AM
  #25
Foal
In my experience, barefoot horses have much more traction than shod horses. I have heard that special boots are used to reduce traction for barefoot horses that are competing with sliding stops.

Looking at the photos of your mares feet, you can see that about 1/2" down from the coronet, the angle of the wall changes. When the horse is completely transitioned, you will not see this change in angle. During transitioning, the angle will appear to move down the hoof wall. It looks very odd when this angle change gets close to the bottom of the hoof, almost like the hoof is wearing a visor. Don't worry, the wall will be straight in another trim or two.

Another thing that you can see on these hooves is the ripples . . . But my comment is more on way the ripples are lined up, rather than the nutritional implications. You can clearly see on the right hind how the ripples make a very strong curve, following the underrun heels. As your horse is transitioned, these will straighten out.

Keep in mind that the sole of the foot is skin. Just as your hands become calloused from handling tools, the sole gets thick callouses from being in contact with the ground. If your hoof care person keeps removing this callous, it is going to keep the feet sensitive.

The correctly trimmed barefoot horse will have a slight arch at the quarters. Notice how many horses' hooves are breaking at the quarters? The hoof is trying to accomplish this arch on its own. The edge of the hoof should be rolled so that the rim contacts near the white line--not flat from white line to outer wall. The roll keeps the hoof from chipping. If the hoof is rolled and it still chips, it is probably too long. Chipping usually means that the hoof is trying to get shorter because it *needs* to be shorter.

Many barefoot practitioners recommend putting pea gravel around the watering trough and other areas where the horses walk frequently, to inspire callousing. But don't do what one gal tried and put gravel in your horse's boots! That is just torture!!

Another thing to keep in mind is that even if you have a perfect trimmer, your horse's feet are likely to reach a level of conditioning that allow it to be comfortable on the surface it is on all the time. If your horse lives in a stall on shavings or on soft pasture, it may not ever develop barefoot soundness on all surfaces. If your horse lives on rocky ground, you may not EVER need trims, and your horse may 'condition itself' to 100% barefoot soundness.

Your mare appears to be an excellent candidate for complete barefoot soundness. Keep studying, talk with other people in your discipline whose horse's feet look great and who run their horses barefoot.

Good luck.
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    12-28-2012, 02:24 PM
  #26
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by rydenskirt    
Looking at the photos of your mares feet, you can see that about 1/2" down from the coronet, the angle of the wall changes. When the horse is completely transitioned, you will not see this change in angle. During transitioning, the angle will appear to move down the hoof wall. It looks very odd when this angle change gets close to the bottom of the hoof, almost like the hoof is wearing a visor. Don't worry, the wall will be straight in another trim or two.
I photograph my horse's feet after each farrier visit so I can keep tabs on his progress. He started out with some pretty horrible quarter flares like OP's horse- in his case they were from bad barefoot trimming. Here's the progression of the flare down the hoof wall that rydenskirt described:

(first day I had him)



(first trim with new farrier)
(December... almost looks like a normal foot from the front now!)
     

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