Splitting and Sole Bruising- Suggestions?
 
 

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Splitting and Sole Bruising- Suggestions?

This is a discussion on Splitting and Sole Bruising- Suggestions? within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Coconut oil on hooves
  • Horse split in sole

 
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    08-12-2012, 06:01 AM
  #1
Yearling
Splitting and Sole Bruising- Suggestions?

Backstory-
I entrusted my horse to a friend while I left for a 7 week trip. It was well understood that I was still financially responsible for my horse, and that if anything was needed, my friend was to call me, and I would get it dealt with.

Right before I left for my trip, my horse had his feet trimmed. His hooves grow quite quickly, so I was surprised to hear, during my regular updates while travelling, that he didn't need a hoof trim, and was doing just fine. I thought this could be possible, considering he was out on 75 acres of varied terrain and could possibly be somewhat self trimming.

I arrived home from my trip and wasn't able to get up to see my horse until a week later- so 8 weeks from his last trim, almost to the day.

I was absolutely appaled when I arrived. I had another friend, who is a certified barefoot trimmer, coming up to trim him that day, and am very glad I did, as I wouldn't have known where to even begin.

(I will post pictures when my friend sends them.)

I actually cried a bit when I saw the state of his feet- they were not just 'long'... they were about 1 3/4" too long, dry as a desert and with some deep and long cracks, and starting to 'self trim,' with pieces having broken off.

I'm very upset and angered that when I asked my friend directly if he needed a trim, I was told 'no,' when it was extremely obvious that he did!

My horse is also overweight at this point, I'm going to guess about a 7 on the Henneke Body Scoring Chart (though I am not an expert by any stretch).

Also, the way his feet were wearing was a-typical; he had very long toes, with no wearing at all. Normally, when he is due for a trim, he has flaring out to the sides, but the toe is worn.

Those last two points, combined with the fact that he was laying down when I went to catch him (though that could be somewhat irrelevant) lead me to think that he may be in the beginning stages of laminitis, leaning back to take weight off his fronts, etc.

In addition to that, once we started trimming him, it was discovered that the soles of 3 of his hooves are extensively bruised- the only one without entensive bruising has a small injury mid-cannon bone, I assume from a kick from one of the other horses in the field, that as a result he was favouring.

My course of action at that point was:
-finish trimming what we could, schedule for next week;
-get him off of that pasture and on to a dry lot with no grass (only a couple hours later);
-pad his front hooves (1 1/2" styrofoam, then vet wrap, then duct tape) to provide some comfort;
-conditioning his hooves with coconut oil
**which is also anti-fungal; this is good since trimmer believes that the cracks may have something to do with a fungus**
-control his food intake, for weight loss;
-supplement his omega-3 intake, to help moisturize his hooves.

It was also suggested to me that I use something to 'toughen' his soles, to help with the bruising while it's healing- I cannot find a product thorughly researched enough that I agree with using it- does anybody have a natural solution, or another idea overall?

My poor Whiskey was given some bute tonight as well, I just couldn't stand to see him as sore as he is.

Please, any advice would be appreciated. If I left out any information that would be helpful please just ask.
     
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    08-12-2012, 01:27 PM
  #2
Foal
Durasole will toughen the soles. Venice Turpentine can be used as well but is quite messier than Durasole.
     
    08-12-2012, 05:57 PM
  #3
Yearling
Durasole
     
    08-13-2012, 02:11 AM
  #4
Yearling
Thanks for the suggestions, both of you.

Update for the day:
I had my trimmer out again (everybody needs a farrier friend!) and we pulled off his styrofoam pads and walked him out; he is a bit ouchy but can move freely. We decided to not re-pad him (I will be there tomorrow morning though, and can apply them again if needed).
With the pressure from the long toes gone, and the hoof having settled over the course of a few days, his cracks now appear less severe, though I do realize we aren't out of the woods yet.
I'm still waiting for the pictures from my trimmer, technical difficulties.
Since he is walking so well I'm going to hold off on the sole hardener unless he needs it, but I'm glad to have a couple suggestions for durasole, as that seemed to be what google suggested as the best!

If anyone has any suggestions for something I should be doing differently, I'm willing to consider everything towards having my boy heal properly.

Thanks.
     
    08-13-2012, 03:47 AM
  #5
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by aspin231    
I'm very upset and angered that when I asked my friend directly if he needed a trim, I was told 'no,' when it was extremely obvious that he did!
I would be a little disappointed perhaps, with myself for assuming the friend was more knowledgeable than they were, but I wouldn't personally get my knickers in a knot about a horse going 8 weeks at all. While more frequently is best, 8 weeks isn't drastic.

Quote:
Also, the way his feet were wearing was a-typical; he had very long toes, with no wearing at all. ...
Those last two points, combined with the fact that he was laying down when I went to catch him (though that could be somewhat irrelevant) lead me to think that he may be in the beginning stages of laminitis, leaning back to take weight off his fronts, etc.
Sounds like there is a fair chance he's(or was) suffering a laminitic attack, which could also account for a little longer trim cycle leading to a lot of damage. I would get onto a good equine vet & have him tested for IR. You'll need to manage his diet strictly, not just his feet, and get/keep him down to a healthy weight. I'd be feeding him soaked & drained hay until he's tested.

Quote:
the soles of 3 of his hooves are extensively bruised-
Could be a laminitic attack that's caused bleeding of the solar corium, but could just be that he's thin soled or chronic & a minor laminitic attack was the 'final straw' or such. Could be that he was chased by a 'bully' horse over terrain his feet weren't good enough for, which caused stone bruising & him lying down to get off them may be nothing to do with laminitis.

Of your 'course of action' I don't know about the coconut oil & am a bit skeptical about it, but if it's anti-bacterial as well as antifungal, might be good. I generally use t-tree. The omega 3 supp is a good move I reckon, although it doesn't really 'moisturise' them & they don't need that. There are many other nutrients that may be lacking or imbalanced that are needed for healthy hoof growth too, such as copper, magnesium, zinc, iodine....

Re a sole hardener, it can help a little, but it doesn't give the horse any more protection from bruising - for that soles need to grow thick, not be hard. So I'd still be protecting & padding his feet when/as necessary.
     

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